Matching Items (4)

Situated Journalism

Description

There's a growing trend of transparency in the media that has been reflected in the Society of Professional Journalists' Code of Ethics. SPJ advocates that journalists "explain ethical choices and processes to the audience" and "expose unethical conduct." Transparency currently

There's a growing trend of transparency in the media that has been reflected in the Society of Professional Journalists' Code of Ethics. SPJ advocates that journalists "explain ethical choices and processes to the audience" and "expose unethical conduct." Transparency currently means taking responsibility for your work and not allowing yourself to be compromised by conflicts of interest. It doesn't usually mean being open about your beliefs, positions and perspectives. We would argue that it could, and should. There are many examples of publications making mistakes because they lacked the knowledge and understanding of someone from a different perspective. Additionally, there are many examples of journalists lacking in information because they were trying to remain objective. There should be a place where journalists can be open about where they are coming from and give their perspective on a situation. Using many different perspectives we can build a bigger, and more accurate, picture around the context of a situation. This thesis project examines objectivity and proposes a new philosophical approach based on Situated Knowledges by Donna Haraway. We examine media case studies to expose issues with the coverage of news when objectivity is the main goal.

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Created

Date Created
2016-05

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JUST ONE OF THE GUYS? AN ANALYSIS OF THE PRINT-MEDIA COVERAGE JANET NAPOLITANO RECEIVED IN THE 2002 ARIZONA GUBERNATORIAL ELECTION

Description

This thesis analyzes the print-media coverage of female candidates for public office in Arizona. Former research has found that, historically, female candidates receive less overall coverage, less issue coverage, and more coverage focused on appearance and family in comparison to

This thesis analyzes the print-media coverage of female candidates for public office in Arizona. Former research has found that, historically, female candidates receive less overall coverage, less issue coverage, and more coverage focused on appearance and family in comparison to their male counterparts. Such biased coverage has countless detrimental effects on female candidates in influencing the public's perception of their viability as candidates and their ability to perform in office. To explore how female candidates in Arizona are treated by their local print media, I specifically analyzed how the two largest newspapers in Arizona, The Arizona Republic and Arizona Daily Star, covered Janet Napolitano as a gubernatorial candidate in 2002. In the first chapter, I compared general election coverage of Napolitano to that of her male opponents Matt Salmon, Richard Mahoney, and Barry Hess. In the second chapter, I compared in-depth general election articles about Napolitano to in-depth general election articles about Jan Brewer during her campaign for governor in 2010. From the first chapter, then, I could analyze coverage differences between female and male candidates, and from the second chapter I could examine coverage differences between female candidates with very different lifestyles. In conjunction, these two chapters produced a broad picture of the media climate for female gubernatorial candidates in Arizona.

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Created

Date Created
2014-05

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Gastrodiplomacy: Opening Minds by Filling Stomachs

Description

"Gastrodiplomacy: Opening Minds by Filling Stomachs" explores the role of food as an instrument of cross-cultural exchange and understanding, in three parts: why food is an ideal medium of communication, how food exchange can be an effective catalyst of conflict

"Gastrodiplomacy: Opening Minds by Filling Stomachs" explores the role of food as an instrument of cross-cultural exchange and understanding, in three parts: why food is an ideal medium of communication, how food exchange can be an effective catalyst of conflict resolution, and a study that highlights the relationship between ethnic food consumption and positive or negative stereotyping of racial and ethnic groups. The study revealed that those who ate food that lies beyond their culture's traditional culinary boundaries fairly often were more likely to have a higher opinion of different racial and ethnic groups; those who rarely strayed beyond those boundaries were more likely to negatively stereotype different cultures. "Gastrodiplomacy" works its way through the foods of the world, and how innately geography, food, and politics are connected, whether it's through French discrimination against kebabs \u2014 a traditionally Middle Eastern food \u2014 or through the use of the dolma to help settle long-standing disputes between the warring countries of Armenia and Azerbaijan.

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Created

Date Created
2015-05

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The revolution will be framed: how organizers and participants used communication media during the Arab Spring revolution in Tunisia

Description

The Arab Spring revolutions of 2010-11 raised important questions about how social-movement actors use new communication technologies, such as social media, for communication and organizing during episodes of contentious politics. This dissertation examines how organizers of and participants in Tunisia’s

The Arab Spring revolutions of 2010-11 raised important questions about how social-movement actors use new communication technologies, such as social media, for communication and organizing during episodes of contentious politics. This dissertation examines how organizers of and participants in Tunisia’s Arab Spring revolution used communication technologies such as Facebook, blogs, news websites, email, television, radio, newspapers, telephones, and interpersonal communication. The dissertation approaches the topic through the communication paradigm of framing, which the author uses to tie together theories of social movements, neo-patrimonialism, and revolution. The author traveled to Tunisia and conducted 44 interviews with organizers and participants about their uses of communication media, the frames they constructed and deployed, their framing strategies, their organizing activities, and their experiences of the revolution. The most common frames were those of the regime’s corruption, economic issues, and the security forces’ brutality. Interviewees deployed a hybrid network of media to disseminate these frames; Facebook represented a single node in the network, though many interviewees used it more than any other node. To explain the framing process and the resonance of the frames deployed by revolutionaries, the dissertation creates the concept of the alternative narrative, which describes how revolutionaries used a hybrid network to successfully construct an alternative to the narrative constructed by the regime. The dissertation also creates the concept of authoritarian weakening, to explain how citizens can potentially weaken neo-patrimonial regimes under conditions concerning corruption, poverty, and the introduction of civil society and of new communication technologies.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2018