Matching Items (2)

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Modeling and control of flapping wing micro aerial vehicles

Description

Interest in Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) research has surged over the past decade. MAVs offer new capabilities for intelligence gathering, reconnaissance, site mapping, communications, search and rescue, etc. This thesis

Interest in Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) research has surged over the past decade. MAVs offer new capabilities for intelligence gathering, reconnaissance, site mapping, communications, search and rescue, etc. This thesis discusses key modeling and control aspects of flapping wing MAVs in hover. A three degree of freedom nonlinear model is used to describe the flapping wing vehicle. Averaging theory is used to obtain a nonlinear average model. The equilibrium of this model is then analyzed. A linear model is then obtained to describe the vehicle near hover. LQR is used to as the main control system design methodology. It is used, together with a nonlinear parameter optimization algorithm, to design a family multivariable control system for the MAV. Critical performance trade-offs are illuminated. Properties at both the plant output and input are examined. Very specific rules of thumb are given for control system design. The conservatism of the rules are also discussed. Issues addressed include

What should the control system bandwidth be vis--vis the flapping frequency (so that averaging the nonlinear system is valid)?

When is first order averaging sufficient? When is higher order averaging necessary?

When can wing mass be neglected and when does wing mass become critical to model?

This includes how and when the rules given can be tightened; i.e. made less conservative.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Self-Organization of Multi-Agent Systems Using Markov Chain Models

Description

The problem of modeling and controlling the distribution of a multi-agent system has recently evolved into an interdisciplinary effort. When the agent population is very large, i.e., at least on

The problem of modeling and controlling the distribution of a multi-agent system has recently evolved into an interdisciplinary effort. When the agent population is very large, i.e., at least on the order of hundreds of agents, it is important that techniques for analyzing and controlling the system scale well with the number of agents. One scalable approach to characterizing the behavior of a multi-agent system is possible when the agents' states evolve over time according to a Markov process. In this case, the density of agents over space and time is governed by a set of difference or differential equations known as a {\it mean-field model}, whose parameters determine the stochastic control policies of the individual agents. These models often have the advantage of being easier to analyze than the individual agent dynamics. Mean-field models have been used to describe the behavior of chemical reaction networks, biological collectives such as social insect colonies, and more recently, swarms of robots that, like natural swarms, consist of hundreds or thousands of agents that are individually limited in capability but can coordinate to achieve a particular collective goal.

This dissertation presents a control-theoretic analysis of mean-field models for which the agent dynamics are governed by either a continuous-time Markov chain on an arbitrary state space, or a discrete-time Markov chain on a continuous state space. Three main problems are investigated. First, the problem of stabilization is addressed, that is, the design of transition probabilities/rates of the Markov process (the agent control parameters) that make a target distribution, satisfying certain conditions, invariant. Such a control approach could be used to achieve desired multi-agent distributions for spatial coverage and task allocation. However, the convergence of the multi-agent distribution to the designed equilibrium does not imply the convergence of the individual agents to fixed states. To prevent the agents from continuing to transition between states once the target distribution is reached, and thus potentially waste energy, the second problem addressed within this dissertation is the construction of feedback control laws that prevent agents from transitioning once the equilibrium distribution is reached. The third problem addressed is the computation of optimized transition probabilities/rates that maximize the speed at which the system converges to the target distribution.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020