Matching Items (4)

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HOW MANUFACTURING LOCATION DECISIONS CORRELATE WITH STATE BUSINESS CLIMATE FACTORS

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This paper analyzes the correlation between unionization, corporate income taxes, and educational attainment with manufacturing firm locations at the state level across the USA. The paper analyzes the factors that

This paper analyzes the correlation between unionization, corporate income taxes, and educational attainment with manufacturing firm locations at the state level across the USA. The paper analyzes the factors that influence firms per capita in a state using the Ordinary Least Squares regression model, with panel data, and fixed effects. The regression takes data from 2012 through 2016 and shows the correlation between unionization, educational attainment, and taxes on firm location. The paper cites Timothy Bartik’s findings (1985) and addresses reasons for changes in results for today’s economy.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Analysis of the Apartments Surrounding Arizona State University: How Much Does the Distance to Campus Affect the Rental Price of Apartments?

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With the ongoing student debt crisis and the continuing increase in the cost of attending a college or university, there has been an increasing conversation regarding the price of room

With the ongoing student debt crisis and the continuing increase in the cost of attending a college or university, there has been an increasing conversation regarding the price of room and board. Prior studies have shown the presence of a relationship between the distance to a location of interest, but few have been done with college campuses in mind. To answer this question, we used the Hedonic Pricing Model in order to isolate the effect that the distance to campus has on the rental price of apartments. Our results showed a clear positive nonlinear relationship between distance to campus and the price of apartment rentals in the area surrounding Arizona State University.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Essay on dynamic matching

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In the first chapter, I study the two-sided, dynamic matching problem that occurs in the United States (US) foster care system. In this market, foster parents and foster children can

In the first chapter, I study the two-sided, dynamic matching problem that occurs in the United States (US) foster care system. In this market, foster parents and foster children can form reversible foster matches, which may disrupt, continue in a reversible state, or transition into permanency via adoption. I first present an empirical analysis that yields four new stylized facts related to match transitions of children in foster care and their exit through adoption. Thereafter, I develop a two-sided dynamic matching model with five key features: (a) children are heterogeneous (with and without a disability), (b) children must be foster matched before being adopted, (c) children search for parents while foster matched to another parent, (d) parents receive a smaller per-period payoff when adopting than fostering (capturing the presence of a financial penalty on adoption), and (e) matches differ in their quality. I use the model to derive conditions for the stylized facts to arise in equilibrium and carry out predictions regarding match quality. The main insight is that the intrinsic disadvantage (being less preferred by foster parents) faced by children with a disability exacerbates due to the penalty. Moreover, I show that foster parents in high-quality matches (relative to foster parents in low-quality matches) might have fewer incentives to adopt.

In the second chapter, I study the Minnesota's 2015 Northstar Care Program which eliminated the adoption penalty (i.e., the decrease in fostering-based financial transfers associated with adoption) for children aged six and older, while maintaining it for children under age six. Using a differences-in-differences estimation strategy that controls for a rich set of covariates, I find that parents were responsive to the change in direct financial payments; the annual adoption rate of older foster children (aged six to eleven) increased by approximately 8 percentage points (24% at the mean) as a result of the program. I additionally find evidence of strategic adoption behavior as the adoption rate of younger children temporarily increased by 9 percentage points (23% at the mean) while the adoption rate of the oldest children (aged fifteen) temporarily decreased by 9 percentage points (65% at the mean) in the year prior to the program's implementation.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Essays on Charitable Fundraising, Free Riding, and Public Good Provision

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This dissertation consists of three essays on public good provision.

The first chapter develops a model of charity’s choice of fundraising method under two dimensions of asymmetric information, quality and purpose.

This dissertation consists of three essays on public good provision.

The first chapter develops a model of charity’s choice of fundraising method under two dimensions of asymmetric information, quality and purpose. The main implication is a separating equilibrium where higher-quality charities choose to distinguish themselves by using a traditional fundraising method, while lower-quality ones exploit a low-stakes, take-it- or leave-it, ``checkout’’ method. An empirical application reinforced that charities of lower quality are more likely to adopt the checkout method. Despite this, consumers still choose to give in the equilibrium, due to the small requested amount of checkout donations, which disincentivizes serious thinking. Although exploited by lower-quality charities, the checkout method, along with purpose uncertainty, has the potential to alleviate the free-riding problem associated with public good provision and is, therefore, welfare improving.

The second chapter studies why corporations donate to charities and

how their donations affect social welfare. I propose that firms make donations out of an image reason. In a model where two firms compete with each other, charitable donation could attract consumers and also signal firm overall social responsibility. I show that there exists an equilibrium where the high responsibility firm overdonates,

resulting in a donation level closer to the socially optimal

one. This leads to higher consumer welfare due to higher private good

consumption as well as higher public good consumption when overdonation is prominent. Overall social welfare is enhanced. Empirical results support social image as an incentive for firms to donate.

The third chapter examines people's marginal willingness to pay for a change in local public good provision. We use a fixed effects hedonic model with MSA level data to study the effect of crime on local housing price. We explore the 1990s crime drop and use abortion data in 1970s and 1980s as an instrumental variable based on \citet*{donohue2001impact}. One result we find is that a decrease in murder of 100 cases per 10,000 people increases housing price by 70\%. We further translate this result into a value of a statistical case of homicide, which is around 0.4 million in 1999 dollars.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017