Matching Items (4)

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Building an Inclusive Library through Staff Accessibility Training

Description

Libraries provide a needed third place for students to engage with their peers and faculty, both academically and socially. Staff behavior, knowledge, and skills in providing an accessible and inclusive environment are key to helping students with disabilities feel that

Libraries provide a needed third place for students to engage with their peers and faculty, both academically and socially. Staff behavior, knowledge, and skills in providing an accessible and inclusive environment are key to helping students with disabilities feel that they belong in the libraries. This makes training in disability and accessibility awareness a necessary component of the overall program for the library. This study assessed a locally-developed, online training program for staff of all levels that was intended to improve staff knowledge and skills in disability etiquette, library services and spaces that support people with disabilities, and the policies that govern this work. The program used the four-part Deines-Jones (1999) model for its content and the core principles of andragogy for its instructional design. Assessment focused on changes in beliefs and knowledge using an adapted standardized scale, and evidence for learning from responses to training program questions, focus group discussions, and survey responses. Further development of the training program was informed by the principles of andragogy. Participants in the training program improved their scores in the knowledge domain but had no change in their beliefs domain. Learning was most evident in spaces where it engaged with previous knowledge and supportive customer service approaches. Participants identified and, in several cases, independently pursued new questions that were prompted by the training program. On the whole, participants found the training to be supportive and engaging, with minor changes to structure and focus recommended for the next iteration.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

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Identity Work of Elementary English Language Learners in a Mainstream Science Classroom

Description

This study explored the science learning experiences of elementary English Language Learners (ELLs) in a fourth-grade mainstream science classroom in an urban setting. Informed by ethnographic research and case study design, this study interrogated the celebrated and marginalized practices within

This study explored the science learning experiences of elementary English Language Learners (ELLs) in a fourth-grade mainstream science classroom in an urban setting. Informed by ethnographic research and case study design, this study interrogated the celebrated and marginalized practices within common classroom procedures and what science-related identities the focal ELLs developed within classroom interactions through the lens of identity as position. Additionally, this study examined how the focal ELLs perceived themselves as science learners and how they affiliated with what scientists do and school science. Data collection lasted for two months and included video recordings of science instruction and classroom interactions, interviews with the focal ELLs, and students’ artifacts. Findings revealed that “doing science” in this fourth-grade science classroom was narrowly defined, as the celebrated practices involved mainly following the classroom behavioral codes and telling the right answer to the teacher’s questions. Findings also showed that the three focal ELLs complied with the celebrated practices to various degrees and were positioned marginally or negatively by the teacher and peers. The marginal and negative positioning affected the focal ELLs’ opportunities to engage meaningfully in classroom learning activities. Finally, findings regarding the focal ELLs’ perceptions of themselves as science learners showed the various ways in which they used their experiences inside and outside the classroom to construct their understanding of and relations with scientists and the science subject. This study provided implications for student science identity research and practice for supporting ELLs in the mainstream science classroom.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2021

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Translanguaging in the borderlands: language function in theatre for young audiences written in Spanish and English in the United States

Description

In the United States, we tend to understand linguistic systems as separate and autonomous, and by this understanding, bilinguals are people who speak two different languages and switch between them.  This understanding of bilingualism, however, does not reflect the reality

In the United States, we tend to understand linguistic systems as separate and autonomous, and by this understanding, bilinguals are people who speak two different languages and switch between them.  This understanding of bilingualism, however, does not reflect the reality of the way many bilinguals use language.  Rather than “code-switch” between two languages, sociolinguists posit that many bilinguals understand their language as a single linguistic system, and choose different elements of that system in different situations, a process termed, “translanguaging.” Translanguaging provides an alternative framework for examining bilingual language as an ideological system in plays, particularly plays which use translanguaged dialogue to describe the experiences of young people who dwell on and cross borders, a category of plays I term, “Border Theatre for Young Audiences (TYA).” This descriptive study utilizes grounded theory and close reading theoretically grounded in border studies and sociolinguistic theory to determine what roles Spanish and English play in Border TYA as autonomous systems, and as pieces of a new, translanguaged system.   Playwrights of Border TYA u translanguaging as a structural metaphor for cultural negotiation to examine identity, belonging, and borders.  Translanguaging provides subaltern characters a process for communicating their experiences, examining their identities, and describing encounters with borders in their own unique linguistic system. Border TYA, however, does not exclusively translanguage.  Border TYA also incorporates monolingual dialogue and translation, and in these instances the languages, Spanish and English, function autonomously as tools for teaching audience members to recognize vocabulary and cultural experience.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017

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Bilingual Family Math Club: Students + Families = Success

Description

Federal, state, and local entities prioritized addressing these academic deficiencies over the past several decades. An area of concern for teachers and families is multiplication. The two main purposes of this study are to (1) to determine how multiplication achievement

Federal, state, and local entities prioritized addressing these academic deficiencies over the past several decades. An area of concern for teachers and families is multiplication. The two main purposes of this study are to (1) to determine how multiplication achievement and strategy use change from beginning to end of Bilingual Family Math Club, and (2) determine which of the eight components of Bilingual Family Math Club (BFMC) contribute to student learning outcomes. The components of BFMC are (1) Concrete Representational Abstract (CRA) modeling, (2) explicit vocabulary instruction, (3) word problems, (4) homework, (5) math games, (6) adult/child pairs as family engagement, (7) bilingual instruction, and (8) workshop series. Quantitative data includes pre-and post-intervention student math assessments. Qualitative data includes analysis of the scratch work artifacts students produced solving those assessments, as well as post-intervention from adults and students enrolled in the club. Findings from this study support previous research. Families said six of the components of the club helped them the most: adult-child pairs, series workshops, games during class, the CRA method, homework as games, and having a bilingual club. Two of the eight BFMC components families felt did not support them in learning multiplication were word problems and explicit vocabulary instruction. Quantitative results from a paired sample t-test showed a statistically significant change and large effect sizes in post-assessment scores in all four areas of the assessment: fluency, word problems, single-digit facts, and multi-digit multiplication. This study provided critical information for school leaders and district personnel attempting to implement more effective after school support programs for families in mathematics.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021