Matching Items (22)

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The Use of Biophilic Design to Enhance the Student Experience Implemented in the Prayer and Meditation Room of the Arizona State University Hayden Library

Description

This project examines biophilic design principles to demonstrate the impact it can have on the well-being of college students at Arizona State University. This paper details our collaboration with Hayden Library, and design elements proposed using biophilic design for the

This project examines biophilic design principles to demonstrate the impact it can have on the well-being of college students at Arizona State University. This paper details our collaboration with Hayden Library, and design elements proposed using biophilic design for the new Prayer and Meditation room as part of the 2019 renovations of the library. We will explore and explain what biophilia/biophilic design is and the specific impacts it can have on humans by including a literature review of previous studies and some in-person research experiences. The literature examined includes how biophilic design has specific positive effects on humans and how we can apply this to students visiting the newly renovated Hayden Library. This project also contains data and information from a workshop (November 1, 2018) organized to gather input from professionals at Shepley Bulfinch for the design of the Prayer and Meditation room. The input from the designers is combined with the body of research on biophilic design to present
to the Hayden Library 2020 renovations team.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05

Inclusive Design and the Social Responsibilities of Interior Designers

Description

Over the last few years, we have gradually entered a period of social unrest here in the United States. For the first time in my generation, we are seeing protests fill the streets of major cities across the nation; watching

Over the last few years, we have gradually entered a period of social unrest here in the United States. For the first time in my generation, we are seeing protests fill the streets of major cities across the nation; watching nervously as tensions rise amongst nationalities, religious groups, and political parties, and becoming increasingly more concerned as many powerful countries appear to be on the brink of war. Many people sit at home terrified, feeling as though their basic rights and freedoms are in jeopardy under the current tumultuous circumstances. In times such as these, it is the ideas of hope, unity and social empathy are essential to maintaining a functional society. As these issues continue to develop around me, I began to question my role and responsibilities as a designer in the efforts to battle the growing social injustice. I began my early research on the social implications of design and found that according to the US Census report from 2015, over 62% of the United States population live in a major city, and according to a report produced by the United Nations, over 60% of the people on the entire planet are projected to live in urban areas by the year 2030. Knowing these statistics, we can no longer claim to live in a world shaped primarily by nature, but instead in a designed and constructed environment shaped by human beings. In considering this fact, it became increasingly apparent that designers have tremendous influence over the physical and social progress of our world. But design runs deeper than just physical products in our culture, extending to every service and experience we encounter throughout the day. Conversely, although everything in our world has in some way been designed, not everything has been designed well. With this thesis I will address the social implications of interior design and the extents to which the social issues of equality and accessibility are currently being addressed through design. I will introduce the topics of inclusive design and social responsibility as they relate to the profession of interior design, and begin to question how our current module of education seeks to support these ideas of social progress in regard to the growing profession. This thesis will also serve as a reflection on my recent application of this research in an attempt to influence the designers and discipline around me.

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Date Created
2017-05

Designing Social Behaviors

Description

Today, successful design is not only pleasing to the eye but may also help to manage social behaviors which can lead to increased satisfaction and increased revenue for clients. Designers function as problem solvers to provide solutions to challenges certain

Today, successful design is not only pleasing to the eye but may also help to manage social behaviors which can lead to increased satisfaction and increased revenue for clients. Designers function as problem solvers to provide solutions to challenges certain spaces face promoting or driving desired human interaction through effective design of the built environment. The experience-based economy of the 21st century prompts companies to attempt to stage an experience by connecting on a personal level with consumers in order to create value and support consumer needs. In experience-based design, interior design embraces social psychology by structuring the built environment to function as a tool to manage social interactions. Due to the nature of the human animal, social interactions in turn alter the culture of a specific place in an iterative process. Through this dynamic relationship, interior design can seek to either support the culture or function of a place and its users or work to effect change.

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Date Created
2016-05

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Integrating Hospitality & Hospital Design

Description

Plagued by white walls, cold corridors, sterile layouts, and overall design inefficiency, traditional hospitals have created an ironic sense of fear in most people about visiting a place intended to help them heal. This thesis examines the healing qualities for

Plagued by white walls, cold corridors, sterile layouts, and overall design inefficiency, traditional hospitals have created an ironic sense of fear in most people about visiting a place intended to help them heal. This thesis examines the healing qualities for humans in response to a resort-like atmosphere where they are provided with amenities such as a variety of entertainment, food, and recreation options as well as first-class customer service.

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Date Created
2014-05

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Designing for Fulfillment: The Importance of Creative Spaces in Long-Term Healthcare Settings

Description

The introductory section of my thesis will draw heavily from sources written by experts in the field of creative thinking. First, I will introduce the ideas proposed by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi in his groundbreaking publications, Flow and Finding Flow. Here, I

The introductory section of my thesis will draw heavily from sources written by experts in the field of creative thinking. First, I will introduce the ideas proposed by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi in his groundbreaking publications, Flow and Finding Flow. Here, I will discuss the "what" and "why" elements of my thesis, more specifically explaining why creativity is so important and how it could serve to improve the lives of those feeling emotionally or intellectually stifled by their stays in long-term healthcare facilities. Next I will use the steps outlined in Keith Sawyer's Zig Zag to explain the different elements that are involved in achieving creativity, "flow," and fulfillment. This will begin to touch on the issue of "how" from a theoretical perspective. For the latter half of my thesis, I draw from case studies, research papers, and design solutions from architects, designers, and manufacturers alike to begin imagining what designing a creatively conducive long-term care facility would entail, along with providing some examples of how these spaces might look, feel, and function. This portion is not meant to be a comprehensive design solution, but is simply meant to provide a framework and foundation for healthcare designers interested in incorporating creative spaces into their designs. The conclusion of this thesis is that creatively conducive spaces would be a beneficial contribution to the health care environment, particularly in settings that provide long-term care for individuals with limited capacity to leave the facility. These creative spaces will be guided by three key themes: (1) taking influence from children's health care facilities, which are more focused on the formative experiences of the user, (2) utilizing technology to provide opportunity for creative inspiration, expression, and collaboration, and (3) providing patients with the means to be creatively productive, including giving patients the power to control aspects of their environment.

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Date Created
2016-05

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Sustaining Culture: Interiors Heritage Conservation In Adaptive Reuse Projects

Description

Heritage conservation of built environments through adaptive reuse is an integral part of preserving and regenerating a community's cultural memory and identity. The buildings we inherit become the visual storytellers of our communities' histories and traditions; how we design tells

Heritage conservation of built environments through adaptive reuse is an integral part of preserving and regenerating a community's cultural memory and identity. The buildings we inherit become the visual storytellers of our communities' histories and traditions; how we design tells the story of how we lived. It is that treasure that is passed down through generations that morphs the characteristics of collective cultural identity. However, zeitgeist architecture which is adaptively reused, often focuses on preservation, restoration, or conservation of the architecture or the shell. Simultaneously, the heritage interiors are transformed, losing the spirit of place to the new use and program. This thesis argues for the importance of preserving heritage interiors as a vital component of a building's story in adaptive reuse projects, referencing literature about the history of adaptive reuse and heritage conservation in built environments, as well as different approaches, tools, and strategies for heritage conservation in various projects and precedents. The thesis explores multiple case studies of varying typologies in Jordan, the Middle East, which successfully address the challenge of heritage interiors conservation. The study examines the different ways in which the spirit of the interior space is preserved and included as part of the design strategy while transforming the programming of the space and the new functions it serves. Examples of such strategies include materials and textiles, furniture, fixtures, use of original materials and architectural features, and the degree of intervention in the preservation, restoration, and conservation of the interiors. The thesis is grounded in the question of how adaptive reuse can approach heritage interiors in a way that conserves the experience of the architecture and the interiors while transforming the programming of the space.

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Date Created
2021-05

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Office design: an exploration of worker satisfaction and their perceptions of effective workspaces

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ABSTRACT Recent studies indicate that top-performing companies have higher-performing work environments than average companies. They receive higher scores for worker satisfaction with their overall physical work environment as well as higher effectiveness ratings for their workspaces (Gensler, 2008; Harter et

ABSTRACT Recent studies indicate that top-performing companies have higher-performing work environments than average companies. They receive higher scores for worker satisfaction with their overall physical work environment as well as higher effectiveness ratings for their workspaces (Gensler, 2008; Harter et al., 2003). While these studies indicate a relationship between effective office design and satisfaction they have not explored which specific space types may contribute to workers' overall satisfaction with their physical work environment. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between workers' overall satisfaction with their physical work environments and their perception of the effectiveness of spaces designed for Conceptual Age work including learning, focusing, collaborating, and socializing tasks. This research is designed to identify which workspace types are related to workers' satisfaction with their overall work environment and which are perceived to be most and least effective. To accomplish this two primary and four secondary research questions were developed for this study. The first primary question considers overall workers' satisfaction with their overall physical work environments (offices, workstations, hallways, common areas, reception, waiting areas, etc.) related to the effective use of work mode workspaces (learning, focusing, collaborating, socializing). The second primary research question was developed to identify which of the four work mode space types had the greatest and least relationship to workers' satisfaction with the overall physical work environment. Secondary research questions were developed to address workers' perceptions of effectiveness of each space type. This research project used data from a previous study collected from 2007 to 2012. Responses were from all staff levels of US office-based office workers and resulted in a blind sample of approximately 48,000 respondents. The data for this study were developed from SPSS data reports that included descriptive data and Pearson correlations. Findings were developed from those statistics using coefficient of determination.

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Created

Date Created
2013

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How daylight is holistically integrated as an element of the built environment: a case study of the Scottsdale Arabian Library

Description

For most of our history humans have been closely tied to energy provided by the sun. Phases of light and dark initiate major biological functions within each day and regulate patterns of sleep and heightened alertness. Daylight was historically synonymous

For most of our history humans have been closely tied to energy provided by the sun. Phases of light and dark initiate major biological functions within each day and regulate patterns of sleep and heightened alertness. Daylight was historically synonymous with sophisticated architecture, providing a mysterious play of light and illuminating productive tasks. It is only within the last 150 years that humans have sought to improve upon daylight, largely replacing it with artificially fueled systems. A new scientific approach to providing interior light has focused on the visible spectrum, negating the remainder of energy from our lives. This thesis considers the full spectrum of natural daylight, and its potential for improving human health, and well being. The literature review explores a brief history of solar architecture leading into the 21st century. A case study of the award winning Arabian Library in Scottsdale Arizona reveals four methods of passive daylight integration. A phenomenological ethnographic methodology assessed the impact of these four strategies on interior lighting quality, documented from the designer's perspective. As the science of photobiology continues to advance, it has become clearly evident that natural daylight provides more than mere illumination, and should be considered an essential element of the interior built environment.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2013

How a Building in the Sonoran Desert Can be Water Positive by Working in Harmony with the Natural Hydrological Cycle of the Site

Description

Our current water usage practices and consumption have run us into dire need for change: our over-usage from the Colorado River and depletion of groundwater resources have led us to draw out more than we can replenish, and this cycle

Our current water usage practices and consumption have run us into dire need for change: our over-usage from the Colorado River and depletion of groundwater resources have led us to draw out more than we can replenish, and this cycle is becoming increasingly more expensive.A solution to this from an architectural standpoint is to have the building work with the natural hydrological cycle of its respective site. In doing so, the building will not only benefit the environment of its site, but will provide the public with education on the need for greater
conservation.
This thesis project first looks to the Living Building Challenge’s Water Petal framework as standards for this building to follow. The framework outlines that the building needs to be water positive, meaning all the water needs to be taken from the environment, run through the building, and discharged back out into the environment in a safe manner that benefits the local environment. To begin my research, I first looked to case studies of buildings that incorporate elements of the hydrological cycles of their sites, studying how these buildings function
efficiently without causing damage or depleting resources. The project then goes onto analyze the site on which the building will sit. The prototype building is located in Papago Park, facing the Papago Buttes. The building itself is a meditation pavilion, providing a place for visitors to rest and enjoy the beauty of the natural landscape.
In terms of the water systems at work in the building, the project acquires water through several means. The first is through rain, in which the building catches rainwater on slanted planes of the roof as well as through a ground filtration system within the landscaped zones surrounding the building. The water filters through the soil, through multiple filters and eventually to a large storage tank below. Water is also collected using existing bioswales lining the nearby canal to harness water as part of the building system. This water is also filtered and sent to the storage tank. Because of the weather patterns we have here in Arizona, the storage tank is very large, needing to hold about 3,000 gallons of water. This water is then ready to be used by toilets or irrigation, or treated one step further through the process of ozonation to be used for sinks and drinking fountains. The blackwater, or sewage water, then gets pumped through a
membrane bioreactor in which sludge is sent to an anearobic digester and the remaining water continues to a constructed wetland where it ends its journey. Along the way, this water is pumped through a shallow channel in the ground in which people within the building can view as it makes its way out to the wetland. Upon reaching the wetland, the water will eventually seep back into the ground, replenishing the natural water table and thus completing the full loop cycle
of the project.

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Date Created
2019-05

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Using design to make the home whole: meaning and the model home : Arizona in the 1950s

Description

Scholars have written much about home and meaning, yet they have said little about the professionally furnished model home viewed as a cultural artifact. Nor is there literature addressing how the home building industry uses these spaces to promote images

Scholars have written much about home and meaning, yet they have said little about the professionally furnished model home viewed as a cultural artifact. Nor is there literature addressing how the home building industry uses these spaces to promote images of family life to increase sales. This research notes that not only do the structure, design, and layout of the model home formulate cultural identity but also the furnishings and materials within. Together, the model home and carefully selected artifacts placed therein help to express specific chosen lifestyles as that the home builder determines. This thesis considers the model home as constructed as well as builder's publications, descriptions, and advertisements. The research recognizes the many facets of merchandising, consumerism, and commercialism influencing the design and architecture of the suburban home. Historians of visual and cultural studies often investigate these issues as separate components. By contrast, this thesis offers an integrated framework of inquiry, drawing upon such disciplines as cultural history, anthropology, and material culture. The research methodology employs two forms of content analysis - image and text. The study analyzes 36 model homes built in Phoenix, Arizona, during the period 1955-1956. The thesis explores how the builder sends a message, i.e. images, ideals, and aspirations, to the potential home buyer through the design and decoration of the model home. It then speculates how the home buyer responds to those messages. The symbiotic relationship between the sender and receiver, together, tells a story about the Phoenix lifestyle and the domestic ideals of the 1950s. Builders sent messages surrounding convenience, spaciousness, added luxury, and indoor-outdoor living to a growing and discriminating home buying market.

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Date Created
2013