Matching Items (5)

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Female Collegiate Gymnast's Nutritional Knowledge and Health

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Forty collegiate gymnasts were recruited for a nutrition and health study. Participants must have been at least eighteen years old at Arizona State University (ASU) in the club or team

Forty collegiate gymnasts were recruited for a nutrition and health study. Participants must have been at least eighteen years old at Arizona State University (ASU) in the club or team gymnastics program. The Institutional Review Board (IRB) reviewed and accepted my survey in order to hand out to the gymnasts. The ASU club and team coach and the ASU study team also approved my survey. As soon as the survey was approved, it was emailed to all of the gymnasts. ASU gymnasts were surveyed on nutritional knowledge and personal health. Subjects answered a quiz on nutrient needs and serving sizes. Personal questions consisted of height, weight, injuries, body image, and typical meal plans. Gymnasts were given a $10 compensation to increase the participation. We found that only 16% of gymnasts surveyed scored a 70% or higher on their nutritional knowledge. Although these gymnasts do not have adequate knowledge, the majority consume a healthy diet. Diets included fruits, vegetables, protein-rich foods, and few high fat and sugary foods. Four of the gymnasts had one or fewer injuries in the past two years, although, four gymnasts also had three or more injuries. No correlation was found between diet and injuries. There was also no correlation between the gymnast's nutritional knowledge and their health.

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Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Functional Movement Screening and Range of Motion Monitoring in Collegiate Baseball Players

Description

Injury, a prevalent issue in Division I collegiate sports, can have negative mental and physical implications. It is thought that certain modifiable biomechanical factors such as muscle imbalance, alterations in

Injury, a prevalent issue in Division I collegiate sports, can have negative mental and physical implications. It is thought that certain modifiable biomechanical factors such as muscle imbalance, alterations in posture, flexibility, and movement dysfunction can increase an athlete's risk of injury. It is imperative to implement a protocol that monitors athletes' functional capabilities and improves movement patterns upon identifying dysfunction to not only reduce the risk of injury, but also to promote and maintain high performance standards. This project studied the effect of a corrective exercise regimen on Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and range of motion (ROM) scores of the Arizona State University baseball team.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

Sun Devil Fitness Complex (SDFC) Tempe User Satisfaction Survey

Description

The purpose of this study was to assess usage and satisfaction of a large university recreation fitness center. Data from 471 respondents was collected during Spring 2018. Although users were

The purpose of this study was to assess usage and satisfaction of a large university recreation fitness center. Data from 471 respondents was collected during Spring 2018. Although users were satisfied overall, we obtained useful information to guide center administration towards improved usage rates and experiences for users of the center.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Core Muscular Asymmetry

Description

This research study examined the bilateral asymmetry found in muscle pairs including the right and left sides of the upper rectus abdominis, lower rectus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique

This research study examined the bilateral asymmetry found in muscle pairs including the right and left sides of the upper rectus abdominis, lower rectus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique in college-aged, apparently fit men and women. Bilateral symmetry was found using surface electromyography (EMG) during three core exercises: 1) ab-slides using paper plates (paper), 2) planks, and 3) ab-slides using a commercial AbSlide® roller device by comparing maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the four muscles previously listed. This research analyzed the percentage of muscle activation during these exercises to each person’s MVC using Noraxon® software. Analysis found that asymmetry for each muscle group was present although there is no measure of clinical significance for symmetry scores of the core muscles yet.
Asymmetry scores were calculated for all three exercises. The exercise that produced the greatest absolute, average asymmetry score was the ab-slide using the roller device. The muscle that the greatest absolute asymmetry was found was the internal oblique. This means that during the three exercises and MVC, the greatest difference between right and left side pair muscles was observed in the internal obliques. The standard deviation of symmetry scores for all exercises and muscles was great as there was much variation in the skill levels in the participants of this study. Bilateral asymmetry was found by visually comparing the asymmetry scores. In conclusion, bilateral asymmetry was found in the core muscles of college-aged individuals during bilateral abdominal exercises.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Heat Stress Degrades Hiking Performance

Description

This study investigated the effect of environmental heat stress on physiological and performance measures during a ~4 mi time trial (TT) mountain hike in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Participants (n

This study investigated the effect of environmental heat stress on physiological and performance measures during a ~4 mi time trial (TT) mountain hike in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Participants (n = 12; 7M/5F; age 21.6 ± 2.47 [SD]) climbed ‘A’ mountain (~1 mi) four times on a hot day (HOT; wet bulb globe temperature [WBGT] = 31.6°C) and again on a moderate day (MOD; WBGT = 19.0°C). Physiological and performance measures were made before and throughout the course of each hike. Mean pre-hike hydration status (urine specific gravity [USG]) indicated that participants began both HOT and MOD trials in a euhydrated state (1.016 ± 0.010 and 1.010 ± 0.008, respectively) and means did not differ significantly between trials (p = .085). Time trial performance was impaired by -11% (11.1 minutes) in the HOT trial (105 ± 21.7 min), compared to MOD (93.9 ± 13.1 min) (p = .013). Peak core temperatures were significantly higher in HOT (38.5 ± 0.36°C) versus MOD (38.0 ± 0.30°C) with progressively increasing differences between trials over time (p < .001). Peak ratings of perceived exertion were significantly higher in HOT (14.2 ± 2.38) compared to MOD (11.9 ± 2.02) (p = .007). Relative intensity (percent of age-predicted maximal heart rate [HR]), estimated absolute intensity (metabolic equivalents [METs]), and estimated energy expenditure (MET-h) were all increased in HOT, but not significantly so. The HOT condition reduced predicted maximal aerobic capacity (CRFp) by 6% (p = .026). Sweat rates differed significantly between HOT (1.38 ± 0.53 L/h) and MOD (0.84 ± 0.27 L/h) (p = .01). Percent body mass loss (PBML) did not differ significantly between HOT (1.06 ± 0.95%) and MOD (0.98 ± 0.84%) (p = .869). All repeated measures variables showed significant between-subjects effects (p < .05), indicating individual differences in response to test conditions. Heat stress was shown to negatively affect physiological and performance measures in recreational mountain hikers. However, considerable variation exists between individuals, and the degree of physiological and performance impairment is probably due, in part, to differences in aerobic fitness and acclimatization status rather than pre- or during-performance hydration status.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019