Matching Items (14)

Dichotomy: A Framework for Curative Drawing to Reduce Stress

Description

Curative arts and art therapy have been increasingly implicated in promoting health and well-being for patients, but little research has been done for the benefits of drawing therapy for stress

Curative arts and art therapy have been increasingly implicated in promoting health and well-being for patients, but little research has been done for the benefits of drawing therapy for stress management or individuals in a non-diseased state. College students and healthcare professionals are particularly susceptible to high levels of stress, as I experienced firsthand as a medical scribe in the Emergency Room during my undergraduate experience. For this reason, I wanted to focus on using curative arts as a mediator for high-stress situations. My creative project is therefore a portable framework for curative drawing. The framework is designed to help people process complex emotional states in a more effective way using mark-making and color. Specifically, the framework is designed for those who have limited experience with art making but can be used by anyone who feels a need for curative drawing. I used this framework in both individual and group settings, culminating in a final gallery show in which viewers were able to participate in the framework and take home a booklet with the framework printed inside. In conjunction with outside research, the help of my thesis committee, and the students of Drawing and Painting as Seeing and Thinking, the final project can be viewed as one part of the intersection between art and medicine in our ever-changing healthcare environment.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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The Walls are Alive with the Sound of Music: Music Therapy Techniques for Incarcerated Persons

Description

A music therapy informed music group program was created and implemented at the Maricopa Reentry Center in Phoenix. This program \u2014 entitled Building Hope Through Music \u2014 utilized music therapy

A music therapy informed music group program was created and implemented at the Maricopa Reentry Center in Phoenix. This program \u2014 entitled Building Hope Through Music \u2014 utilized music therapy techniques including lyric analysis, songwriting, singing, musical games, and guided visualization in order to improve self-awareness, provide a medium for self-expression, increase teamwork and collaboration, promote relaxation, facilitate emotional processing and awareness, and improve tolerance of non-preferred activities in participants. This group was conducted for seven months and had participation from over 400 male ex-offenders.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Using Lyric Analysis to Reduce Negative Self-talk in Women Survivors of Domestic Violence

Description

This document is a proposal for a research project, submitted as an Honors Thesis to Barrett, The Honors College at Arizona State University. The proposal summarizes previous findings and literature

This document is a proposal for a research project, submitted as an Honors Thesis to Barrett, The Honors College at Arizona State University. The proposal summarizes previous findings and literature about women survivors of domestic violence who are suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder as well as outlining the design and measures of the study. At this time, the study has not been completed. However, it may be completed at a future time.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Composing Harmony: The Use of Music Therapy in a Homeless Shelter

Description

According to the National Center on Family Homelessness (2017), Homelessness affects 2.5 million children annually (n.p). Children who are exposed to homelessness many times also suffer from adverse childhood experiences

According to the National Center on Family Homelessness (2017), Homelessness affects 2.5 million children annually (n.p). Children who are exposed to homelessness many times also suffer from adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) which can hinder a younger person's development cognitively, socially, and can cause health problems such as heart disease later on in life. Examples of an ACE are death of a family member, witnessing or experiencing violence, economic hardship, or having a parent with a alcohol or drug addiction. About 70,000 of children in Arizona suffer from five or more ACEs. In this project music therapy interventions such as songwriting, lyric analysis, and recreative instrument play were used to address psychosocial needs for teens at a homeless shelter. The areas of psychosocial needs addressed in the music therapy group were: group cohesion, communication, and self regulation. Objectives were set each session in an eight week program to track progress of the above goals that were created based on the needs of the clients in this setting.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Inclusive Band: Music Learning for Students with Special Needs

Description

Inclusive Band at ASU started in Fall 2017. The group started with four Music Students (individuals with special needs) and a fifth one joined in Spring 2018. The Music Students

Inclusive Band at ASU started in Fall 2017. The group started with four Music Students (individuals with special needs) and a fifth one joined in Spring 2018. The Music Students stuck with the same ASU students (Peer Mentors) from the start until Spring 2019 when there was a shift in membership. This caused the Peer Mentors to have to move to new groups. Some moved to a Music Student that played the same instrument while others were because a member graduated or left Inclusive Band and were replaced by new members. This transition was hard for both Peer Mentors and Music Students. The Music Students were used to their Peer Mentors and built a strong friendship with them. Losing them was hard and some still struggle with it several months later. The Peer Mentors also had difficulties adjusting to teaching a different Music Student. They did not know their strengths and weaknesses or the best way to teach them. This challenge led to the creation of the handbook, which is a guide for future members of Inclusive Band to aid with the transition from semester to semester.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Family Music Therapy for Teenagers with Mental Illness: A Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Program

Description

Adolescents experience a lot of stress from changes and difficulties in their physical appearance and their relationships—affecting their mental and emotional well-being as well as their family's relationships and functioning.

Adolescents experience a lot of stress from changes and difficulties in their physical appearance and their relationships—affecting their mental and emotional well-being as well as their family's relationships and functioning. Research has shown that family music therapy has been fairly successful in helping both children and adolescents and their families improve their communication and mutual attunement while encouraging self-expression in the child and teenager. However, the literature focuses mainly on families with children ages 10 and under, at-risk families, and non-clinical families. Little focus in the research literature is given to adolescents and their mental and emotional health concerns.

The purpose of this thesis was two-fold: 1) to perform a systematic review and collect information from articles that used music interventions or music programs to address the mental health needs of families and adolescents, and 2) to develop a family music therapy program for teenagers with mental health concerns based on the research literature used for the systematic review. Fourteen articles were included in the study. The main interventions and programs were improvisation (n = 6), songwriting (n = 3), lyric analysis or song discussions on client-selected music for introspective and expressive purposes (n = 3), therapeutic singing (n =1) and structured group music making (n = 1). Common outcomes included improvement in the adolescents' self-expression and communication, restoration of family relationships, increased awareness of covert family issues, and improved family communication and interactions. The proposed six-week music therapy program is improvisation-based, considering the amount of improvisational interventions that were found in research. Session plans include interventions such as musical “icebreakers” and warm-ups, improvisation, lyric analysis, and a culminating songwriting experience.

Keywords: family therapy, music therapy, adolescents, mental illness

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Date Created
  • 2019

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Music Therapy Assessment for Alert Hospice Patients: An Ecomap Approach for Assessing Music Preferences

Description

ABSTRACT

Individuals receiving hospice care at the end of life have a unique set of needs, requiring interdisciplinary assessment and treatment to meet their multidimensional circumstances and create a supportive and

ABSTRACT

Individuals receiving hospice care at the end of life have a unique set of needs, requiring interdisciplinary assessment and treatment to meet their multidimensional circumstances and create a supportive and comfortable experience. Music therapy is often an integral component of hospice care utilized to treat the whole person. While there are published music therapy assessment tools for use with the hospice population, there is no assessment tool specifically aimed at understanding the role of music preference in the context of the hospice patient’s multidimensional musical ecosystem identity. The purpose of this thesis was to create an assessment tool to understand and document the individualized connections between a hospice patient’s familiar and preferred music and their musical identity, in order to increase cultural awareness and to utilize music selection with purpose while supporting and empowering the patient. The proposed music preference assessment tool utilizes an ecomap structure and combines theories and philosophies from the fields of music therapy and social work. The needs of the hospice population are identified and music therapy is discussed as a treatment modality in hospice. Existing music therapy and social work assessments are identified and examined and elements of each are utilized in the creation of the proposed music preference assessment tool. A template and example assessment tool are provided with considerations for clinical implications and uses.

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Date Created
  • 2020

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Women's Chant Group: Singing from our Souls

Description

This paper is an exploration of the potential benefits of an all-women’s chant group. A mixed-methods study using a Community Music Therapy approach informed by Feminist Music Therapy Theory

This paper is an exploration of the potential benefits of an all-women’s chant group. A mixed-methods study using a Community Music Therapy approach informed by Feminist Music Therapy Theory sheds light on the questions: How are individuals’ resilience affected by participation in a multi-session Women’s Chant Group? How does participation in a single-session Women’s Chant Group affect an individual’s mood? Which elements of a Women’s Chant Group are perceived to be the most important to the participants? No statistical significance was found in participants’ resiliency from the beginning to end of the study, although a higher sample size may yield more promising results. The Women’s Chant Group sessions demonstrated a considerable positive impact on the mood of the participants, specifically in reducing feelings of anxiety and increasing feelings of relaxation. Participants found the experience of creating aesthetic, complex, high-quality vocal music to be the most important element of the Women’s Chant Group. Recommendations are made for future research into the area of Women’s Chant Groups.

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Date Created
  • 2017

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Theoretical Underpinnings of Music Therapists’ Decisions to (Not) Pursue Doctoral Study: A Framework for a Professional Development Seminar to Promote the Pursuit of Doctoral MT Education

Description

Despite a substantial increase of Masters of Music Therapy degree recipients between 2002 (Cohen et. al, 2002) and 2017 (American Music Therapy Association, 2017), these numbers are not paralleled among

Despite a substantial increase of Masters of Music Therapy degree recipients between 2002 (Cohen et. al, 2002) and 2017 (American Music Therapy Association, 2017), these numbers are not paralleled among recipients of PhD degrees with music therapy emphases. Additionally, it is notable that the Master’s Level Entry (MLE) Subcommittee Report (2017) notes “lack of doctoral programs and/or doctoral level music therapy faculty needed to sustain graduate level music therapy education programs” (p.18) as a deterrent to the move to Master's-Level Entry within the music therapy milieu. This underscores the importance of doctorate-level music therapists to the profession. Could increasing the prevalence of doctorate-level music therapists help to promote advanced studies in music therapy, and in turn augment the status of music therapy education and training? The purpose of this project was to examine advanced-level music therapists’ perceived catalysts and barriers to pursuing a doctoral degree in music therapy. Incorporating the Social Cognitive Career Theory (Lent et. al, 1994) as the underlying framework, qualitative data was garnered via semi-structured interviews with advanced-practicing music therapists located in the southwestern United States. A thematic qualitative data analysis was conducted, whereby parent codes reflected key constructs of the theoretical lens and child codes were developed inductively. Interviewees highlighted advantages of pursuing a PhD including: professional status, educational growth, and opportunities to educate others. Likewise, they identified pertinent barriers pertaining to finances, narrow job market, and dominance of research foci over clinical skills. In light of these findings, a framework for a hypothetical, Southwest-based professional development seminar was developed and embedded into the SCCT context. The hypothetical program encompassed key objectives to educate participants about the key processes, benefits and drawbacks of pursuing the music therapy doctorate, and aimed to help participants develop penchants toward the pursuit of doctorate degrees. The nine modules featured discussions and interactive learning techniques, in addition to proffering individualized mentoring from music therapy doctorate recipients as a key mainstay of the program. Modules addressed the following topics: Introductions and testimonials; PhD application and funding processes; Clinical skills; Work/life/school balance; Faculty responsibilities (research, teaching and service); Mock interview/audition; and Mentorship presentations.

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Date Created
  • 2020

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Music Therapy-Based Workplace Health Promotion Programming: Wellness Facilitated Through Community Music-Making Experientials

Description

Wellness in the workplace is a significant concern for many companies as employees experience both physical and mental health issues based on the environment in which they work. Both sedentary

Wellness in the workplace is a significant concern for many companies as employees experience both physical and mental health issues based on the environment in which they work. Both sedentary behavior and job-related stress, which may cooccur, are associated with the development of chronic disease, occupational stress, absenteeism/presenteeism in the workplace, increased employee turnover, and ultimately higher health care costs for companies. The development and implementation of workplace health promotion programs (WHPPs) is a popular, and at times, highly successful option to mitigate these issues. Yet, even when companies offer WHPPs, there still tends to be a lack of overall awareness, participation, and sustained engagement. Existing research regarding recreational music making (RMM) in the workplace and music therapy to improve wellness may serve to support the development of music therapy-based WHPPs as an effective solution. The evidence-based field of music therapy is an established health profession that uses music interventions to assist individuals in achieving their non-musical goals. This clinical project serves to highlight existing literature in support of the development of music therapy-based WHPPS. Furthermore, by tethering the tenets of previously successful WHPPs, the basic principles of collectivism, and the structural underpinnings of community music therapy, this clinical project offers evidence-based experientials and assessment tools for future implementation. Treatment domains addressed are physiological and psychosocial. Proposed goals include increased opportunity for physical activity, increased opportunity for stress-reduction and relaxation, and increased opportunity for social interaction among participants.

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Date Created
  • 2020