Matching Items (5)

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A Retroactive Study of Parsons Center for Pediatric Dentistry Patient Parents/Guardians: Uncovering Motive for Seeking Specialty Dental Treatment

Description

Parents of patients receiving treatment at Parsons Center for Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics were surveyed in this study in an effort to uncover their motivations to seek specialty dental treatment

Parents of patients receiving treatment at Parsons Center for Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics were surveyed in this study in an effort to uncover their motivations to seek specialty dental treatment for their children. Parsons Center for Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics is a specialty dental clinic that focuses on increasing the accessibility of dental care, serving both insured and uninsured patients in Phoenix, Arizona. The demographic of this study is assumed to be the surrounding areas, including Maricopa County and the zip code to which Parsons pertains, 85009. Approximately half of the population in this area are low income individuals, and a large percentage of the population are of Hispanic/Latino heritage. Over the course of this investigation, eighty participating parents completed a short survey to determine factors relevant in their decision to obtain pediatric, as opposed to general (family) dental treatment, for their children. Parents were asked questions regarding their age, the age and dental treatment history of their children, and the relevance of six factors in their decision to visit the Parsons Center. Overall, "professional/personal recommendation" was the decision factor with the highest average relevance valuation followed by "Spanish-speaking staff," "location," "lack of insurance," "insurance accepted," and "past (patient) traumatic experience." Results suggest the importance of quality care and word-of-mouth recommendations as well as the significance of understanding and serving the needs of one's surrounding population effectively.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Plant Productivity of Various Plants Grown in Coffee Grounds

Description

Over the last century, society has begun to acknowledge and observe how human actions are negatively impacting the environment. Sustainable living is becoming more adopted into daily lives, including a

Over the last century, society has begun to acknowledge and observe how human actions are negatively impacting the environment. Sustainable living is becoming more adopted into daily lives, including a focus on waste management and recycling. Previous informal studies have proposed that coffee grounds can be recycled and added to the soil to increase plant productivity. The objective of this experiment was to test how different concentrations of roasted coffee grounds would affect the overall plant productivity when introduced in the soil of various plant types and environmental atmospheres. Three treatments were selected (100% potting mix, 50% potting mix/50% coffee grounds, and 25% potting mix/75% coffee grounds) and applied to 3 acid-tolerating plants (radish, basil, and parsley). Each of these treatments were grown in 2 different environments, where one was planted in a Tempe, AZ backyard while the other group was planted in a lab environment, locating at Arizona State University's Tempe Campus. Each plant with its respective treatments (plant type, coffee ground treatment, and environment) had 10 identical plants for statistical accuracy, resulting in a total of 180 plants grown, observed, and analyzed for this 3-month long experiment. The plant development, plant height, length of roots, quantity of leaves, and environmental observations were recorded and used to define plant productivity in this investigation. The experiment demonstrated low survival rates in all groups including the control group, suggesting a flaw in the experimental design. Nonetheless, the experiment showed that among the surviving plants, the 75% treatment had the largest negative impact on plant productivity. The measured root lengths and leaf quantity had various results across each plant group, leaving the hypothesis unverified. Overall, the experiment was effective in demonstrating negative impacts of great concentrations of coffee grounds when introduced to various plants, but further investigation with an adjusted experimental design will need to be completed to reach a reliable conclusion.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Testing the Limits of Ethical Issues within the Field of Genetic Counseling

Description

Genetic counseling is a medical field that was established in the 1970s, but whose demand is now growing exponentially due to modern genetic technology. We now have the ability to

Genetic counseling is a medical field that was established in the 1970s, but whose demand is now growing exponentially due to modern genetic technology. We now have the ability to look into the human genetic code, detect the genotype of individuals, and use this knowledge to our benefit. However, Genetic testing results in a need for new ethical boundaries to be drawn. The idea of the "best possible conditions" of conceiving a child and whether this child has a right to not know are the two major ethical issues that will be focused on in order to analyze the ethical boundary that needs to be drawn for genetic counseling. In order to analyze these ethical issues, a focus group of Arizona State University students was organized. After producing results for the focus group, there are no true conclusions that can be drawn that applied to all of society. The focus group sample size was too small to produce a broad range of results and the participants were all Arizona State University Undergraduate students. However, it did become apparent that knowledge on these ethical issues is crucial in order to ensure they do not hinder the field of genetic counseling. It is predicted that in order to have the best outcome for the field of genetic counseling, genetic counselors themselves need to draw the ethical boundaries for the issues studied.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Factors That Prevent Different Age Groups in the Arizona Population from Routinely Visiting the Dentist

Description

Abstract The purpose of this study was to discover the most prominent factors that affect the Arizona population from routinely visiting the dentist. For many people there is a factor

Abstract The purpose of this study was to discover the most prominent factors that affect the Arizona population from routinely visiting the dentist. For many people there is a factor of anxiety or fear, while others have issues with cost, insurance, or even the dental clinic environment. My study looks at some of these factors and supports the data with available research on dental avoidance factors. A significant portion of the study is also allotted to potential solutions to these avoidance factors, in order to increase regular dental visitation. Oral health is extremely important not only to the teeth, but also to the rest of the body. Therefore, it is important to address avoidance factors and find potential solutions to these problems. The study involved 71 participants, eighteen years of age or older, and a questionnaire with twenty-one questions. These questions asked the participants about gender, ethnicity, age, employment, reasons for avoidance, oral health education, and past dental experiences. These questions were designed to better understand how a person's background and understanding of dentistry affect their decision to visit the dentist. These questions also provide insight to why certain avoidance factors apply to different groups of people in the Arizona population. The results of the study showed that anxiety, price, insurance issues, and the personality of the dentist are the most prominent factors that cause individuals to avoid the dentist. Potential solutions to these avoidance factors were given, especially for anxious individuals. There are dentists who deal specifically with anxious individuals through sedation dentistry. Regarding price, there were several options for free or low-cost dental clinics that were provided. Preventative dentistry education was an important focus and solution to many of the avoidance factors, because when individuals are more aware of how to care for their teeth, there is a greater chance that they will have healthier teeth and dental visits will be less invasive and costly. Suggestions were provided for spreading oral health education and preventative dentistry through community programs and schools. Among the avoidance factors addressed, solutions provided, and the importance of oral health and preventative dentistry reiterated, the study stressed the importance of the results to my future profession. As a future dental practitioner, the data and research will be used in order for me to become a more compassionate and accommodating practitioner to my future patients. There is a special relationship and trust between the dental practitioner and their patient, and this study has helped me better understand how to accommodate patients and eliminate the factors that cause them to avoid regular dental visits.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Effects of urbanization on arthropod diversity, community structure and trophic dynamics

Description

Urban ecosystems cover less than 3% of the Earth's land surface, yet more than half of the human population lives in urban areas. The process of urbanization stresses biodiversity and

Urban ecosystems cover less than 3% of the Earth's land surface, yet more than half of the human population lives in urban areas. The process of urbanization stresses biodiversity and other ecosystem functions within and far beyond the city. To understand the mechanisms underlying observed changes in biodiversity patterns, several observational and experimental studies were performed in the metropolitan area of Phoenix, Arizona, and the surrounding Sonoran Desert. The first study was comprised of seven years of arthropod monitoring using pitfall traps in common urban land-use types. This study revealed differences in community structure, diversity and abundance over time and between urban and wildland habitats. Urban habitats with high productivity had higher abundances of arthropods, but lower diversity compared to wildland habitats. Arthropod abundance in less-productive urban habitats was positively correlated with precipitation, but abundance in high-productivity urban habitats was completely decoupled from annual fluctuations in precipitation. This study showed the buffering capacity and the habitat heterogeneity of urban areas. To test the mechanisms controlling community diversity and structure in urban areas, a major field experiment was initiated. Productivity of the native shrub Encelia farinosa and bird predation of associated arthropods were manipulated to test whether bottom-up or top-down forces were more important in urban habitats compared to wildland habitats. Abundance, richness and similarity were monitored, revealing clear differences between urban and wildland habitats. An unusually cold and dry first season had a negative effect on plant growth and arthropod abundance. Plants in urban habitats were relatively unaffected by the low temperature. An increase in arthropod abundance with water availability indicated bottom-up forces in wildland habitats, whereas results from bird exclusions suggested that bird predation may not be as prominent in cities as previously thought. In contrast to the pitfall study, arthropod abundance was lower in urban habitats. A second field experiment testing the sheltering effect of urban structures demonstrated that reduced wind speed is an important factor facilitating plant growth in urban areas. A mathematical model incorporating wind, water and temperature demonstrated that urban habitats may be more robust than wildland habitats, supporting the empirical results.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2010