Matching Items (9)

Phoebus 9: Myriad Points of View

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Phoebus 9: A Journal of Art History - Table of Contents

“Preface” by J. Robert Wills, p. 9-10.

“Collecting Chinese Art” by Roy and Marilyn Papp, p. 13.

“Catalog of the Inaugural Gift

Phoebus 9: A Journal of Art History - Table of Contents

“Preface” by J. Robert Wills, p. 9-10.

“Collecting Chinese Art” by Roy and Marilyn Papp, p. 13.

“Catalog of the Inaugural Gift from the Roy and Marilyn Papp Collection to Phoenix Art Museum” p. 15-43. 

“Exhibitions From the Roy and Marilyn Papp Collection” p. 44-45. 

“Additional Publications” p. 47.

“Romanization Note” p. 48.

“The Daoist Symbolism of Immortality in Shen Zhou’s ‘Watching the Mid-Autumn Moon at Bamboo Villa’” by Chun-yi Lee, p. 49-78.

“Wu Shi'en's ‘Liang Hong and Meng Guang’: A Misreading” by Xiaoping Lin, p. 79-99.

“From the Profound to the Mundane: Depictions of Lohans in Late Ming China” by Janet Baker, p. 101-116.

“Glimpses of the Duanwu Festival by Fang Xun (1736-1799): Commemorative Painting or Private Souvenir?” by Anne Kerlan-Stephens, p. 117-141.

“Pleasure and Pain” by Marion S. Lee, p. 143-165.

“From Narrative to Transformed Narrative: Visualizations of the Heavenly Maiden and the Maiden Magu” by Chen Liu, p. 167-182.

“Glossary of Chinese Names and Terms” p. 185-195

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Created

Date Created
  • 2006

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Chen Rong and the transformation of Nine dragons

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This dissertation is the first detailed and extensive study dedicated to the life and art of the master artist and scholar-official Chen Rong (active 13th century), and offers an expanded

This dissertation is the first detailed and extensive study dedicated to the life and art of the master artist and scholar-official Chen Rong (active 13th century), and offers an expanded analysis of his most famous work, the Nine Dragons scroll (1244). It provides a reconstruction of Chen Rong's biography, character and political career, and discusses his significance and impact in the study of Chinese painting during the late Southern Song dynasty (1127-1279) and beyond, by highlighting the reception and interpretation of the Nine Dragons scroll in the past and in modern times. This is achieved by addressing writings such as eulogies, poems and commentary about Chen Rong by his contemporaries and later biographers, and also analysis of recent works by contemporary Chinese artists that reinterpret Chen Rong's Nine Dragons motif directly. In addition to offering an expanded reading and interpretation of Chen Rong's inscriptions on the Nine Dragons scroll and inscriptions by subsequent viewers of the scroll, this study sheds light on the artistic context, significance, and historical development of dragons and dragon painting in China. This dissertation also offers the first full English transcription and translation of Emperor Qianlong's inscription on the Nine Dragons scroll, and that of his eight officials. Furthermore, this dissertation includes two detailed appendices; one is a detailed appendix of all of Chen Rong's paintings documented to exist today, and the second is a list of paintings attributed to Chen Rong that have been mentioned in historical documents that no longer appear extant. This interdisciplinary study provides insight into the processes that influence how an artist's work is transformed beyond his time to that of legendary status. This clarification of Chen Rong's biography and artistic activity, particularly with respect to his most famous work the Nine Dragons scroll, contributes to modern scholarship by providing an expanded understanding of Chen Rong's life and art, which in turn, adjusts prevailing perceptions of his life and work.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Helen Hyde and Her "Children": Influences, Techniques and Business Savvy of an American Japoniste Printmaker

Description

After the opening of Japan in the mid-1800s many foreigners flocked to the

nation. San Franciscan Helen Hyde (1868-1919) joined the throng in 1899. Unlike many

of her predecessors, however, she went

After the opening of Japan in the mid-1800s many foreigners flocked to the

nation. San Franciscan Helen Hyde (1868-1919) joined the throng in 1899. Unlike many

of her predecessors, however, she went as a single woman and was so taken with Japan

she made it her home over the span of fourteen years. While a number of cursory studies

have been written on Helen Hyde and her work, a wide range of questions have been left

unanswered. Issues regarding her specific training, her printmaking techniques and the

marketing of her art have been touched on, but never delved into. This dissertation will

explore those issues. Helen Hyde's success as a printmaker stemmed from her intense

artistic training, experimental techniques, artistic and social connections and diligence in

self-promotion and marketing as well as a Western audience hungry for "Old Japan," and

its imagined quaintness. Hyde's choice to live and work in Japan gave her access to

models and firsthand subject matter which helped her audience feel like they were getting

a slice of Japan, translated for them by a Western artist. This dissertation provides an in

depth bibliography including hundreds of primary newspaper articles about Hyde who

was lauded for her unique style. It also expands and corrects the listing of her printed

works and examines the working style of an American working in a Japanese system with

Japanese subjects for a primarily American audience. It also provides a listing of known

exhibitions of Hyde's works and a listing of stamps and markings she used on her prints.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Bridging the tradition to the modern, the East to the West: C.C. Wang and his life in art

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The turmoil that China endured during the twentieth century triggered a series of social and political revolutions. As China struggled to resolve domestic questions of dynasticism or democracy and nationalism

The turmoil that China endured during the twentieth century triggered a series of social and political revolutions. As China struggled to resolve domestic questions of dynasticism or democracy and nationalism or communism, Western industrialization and imperialism dragged China rapidly into the globalizing world. Likewise, Chinese painting had to confront the West, as Chinese artists dealt with the twentieth-century version of the recurring question of modernizing Chinese painting for its times: how does one reconcile an ancient painting tradition with all the possibilities Western interactions introduced? This dissertation focuses on one artist's lifelong struggle, often overlooked, to answer this question. By examining C. C. Wang (1907-2003) and his life in art, this case study reveals broader truths about how twentieth century Chinese diaspora painters, such as Wang, modernized the tradition of Chinese ink painting.

Wang's reputation as a connoisseur of ancient Chinese painting has overshadowed his own artwork, creating a dearth of research on his artistic development. Using public and private sources, this dissertation applied stylistic analysis to track this development. The analysis reveals an artist's lifelong endeavor to establish a style that would lift the Chinese painting tradition into a modern era, an endeavor inspired by modern Western art ideas and a desire to play a role in the larger movement of elevating Chinese painting. The argument is made that these efforts establish Wang as an influential twentieth century Chinese ink painter.

To clarify Wang's role within the broader movement of Chinese diaspora painters, this dissertation employs a comparison study of Wang with such established twentieth century ink painting artists as Zhang Daqian, Liu Guosong, and Yu Chengyao. It is

asserted that the 1949 diaspora forced this cohort of artists to adjust their style and to transcend traditional Chinese painting by integrating newly-salient ideas from Western art, particularly the abstract movement. Meanwhile, the essential Chinese identity in their art collectively became more significant. The solidarity of purpose and identity is a distinctive part of the answer this group of twentieth century Chinese diaspora painters proposed to their generation's inherited challenge of enriching the tradition.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Collision Domain between Artistic Subjectivity and National Sovereignty: The Historical Trauma Experience and Political Resistance

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The relationship between Chinese modern and contemporary artistic creation and the national sovereignty of China is a worthy subject of debate. Within it, modernism and intellectual/artistic subjectivity are two necessary

The relationship between Chinese modern and contemporary artistic creation and the national sovereignty of China is a worthy subject of debate. Within it, modernism and intellectual/artistic subjectivity are two necessary starting points. However, there is still a good deal of uncertainty around these two points. First, can the modernization process of China be accepted as the general meaning of modernization? Second, are some Chinese modern and contemporary artists actually modern intellectuals? Based on clarification of the above two uncertainties, this thesis is an attempt to argue that the Chinese artists who regard themselves, their artworks and creations, as intellectual, reflect the collision domain between themselves and the political entity of national sovereignty in China: the communist regime controlled by the CCP, Chinese Communist Party中國共産黨.

In this thesis, three chapters discuss the relationship between Chinese modern and contemporary art and the CCP. In my theoretical exposition, I argue that the artistic/intellectual subjectivity of modern Chinese artists gradually developed and changed during the conflict and struggle with the Communist rule.

In the first chapter, I introduce the biography and artistic creation of Chinese literati painters under the communist rule, exemplified by Wu Hufan吳湖帆. I analyze and demonstrate how the subjectivity of the traditional literati gradually lost strength under the pressure of nationalism, the disenchantment with modernization, and communism. In the second chapter, I focus on the Scar Art art movement of the 1970s to the 1980s, as well as representative artists and their works in this direction of art, such as Cheng Conglin程叢林 and Gao Xiaohua高小華. In this chapter, I use feminism and Foucault's political-philosophical theories to explain these visual expressions of the memory of historical trauma in Scar Art during this period. In Chapter 3, by discussing the works of two artists, He Gong何工 and Ai Weiwei艾未未, in the context of Foucault’s political philosophy, I argue that artists how to express their intellectual subjectivity and political resistance through their contributions to Chinese contemporary art.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Politics and patronage: a re-examination of Late Qing Dynasty porcelain, 1850-1920

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ABSTRACT

Art historians typically consider Chinese porcelain a decorative art, resulting in scholars spending little time analyzing it as a fine art form. One area that is certainly neglected is

ABSTRACT

Art historians typically consider Chinese porcelain a decorative art, resulting in scholars spending little time analyzing it as a fine art form. One area that is certainly neglected is porcelain produced during the late 19th and early 20th century during the late Qing dynasty (1644–1911) into the early Republic period (1912–1949). As the Qing dynasty weakened and ultimately fell in 1911, there was a general decline in the quantity of porcelain produced in China. Due to this circumstance, porcelain of this era has not received the detailed analysis, characterization of styles, comprehension of themes, and understanding of patronage evident in other periods of Chinese porcelain production. Ultimately, limited research has been conducted to establish the styles associated with late dynastic porcelain into the early Republic’s establishment.

This dissertation utilizes a new perspective that considers the patronage of the Empress Dowager Cixi (1835-1908) as a high point of late dynastic porcelain. Concrete documentation establishes that motifs were appropriated from Cixi’s painting, suggesting a direct connection between schools of painting and the imagery selected for porcelain during her reign. The porcelain Cixi influenced directly guided the porcelain produced during the Hongxian era (1915-1916), making Cixi’s patronage the key turning point from dynastic porcelain to early Republic porcelain. Utilizing predominately British collections, this study identifies the styles, symbols, and themes associated with porcelain of the 19th and 20th century, elevating late dynastic and early Republic wares to the status of fine art.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Tales of stone: collecting archaic Chinese jades in the U.S., 1901-1950

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The history of jade in many ways reflects the evolution of Chinese civilization, encompassing its entire history and geographical extent and the many cultural traditions associated with the various regions

The history of jade in many ways reflects the evolution of Chinese civilization, encompassing its entire history and geographical extent and the many cultural traditions associated with the various regions that have finally been brought together in the unity of present-day China. The archaic jade collections investigated in this thesis, from an archaeological point of view, primarily consist of pieces from the late Neolithic through early historic era, named the "Jade Age" by academics. Although well-researched museum catalogues of archaic Chinese jades have been widely published by major museums in the United States, they are mostly single collection oriented. It is, then, necessary to conduct research examining the overall picture of collecting practices in the U.S. Given the proliferation of fake early jades, this study will provide an essential academic reference for researchers, students, and the present art market. This thesis seeks to explore how shifting tastes, political climates, and personal ambitions, as well as various opportunities and personalities, were instrumental factors in shaping these important collections of archaic Chinese jades in the U.S. today.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Ethnicity and Identity in the Art of Giuseppe Castiglione

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My thesis argues that an unrecognized genre existed in classical Chinese painting, one which I call “ethnic" or "minority painting.” The genre of ethnic painting consistently displays certain styles and

My thesis argues that an unrecognized genre existed in classical Chinese painting, one which I call “ethnic" or "minority painting.” The genre of ethnic painting consistently displays certain styles and cultural values and is meant to represent unique ethnic identities. These ideas have not been substantially covered by previous research on Qing dynasty painting. My research raises three main questions: was there a distinct genre in traditional Chinese painting that could be called “ethnic art” (or "minority art")? How did ethnic art distinguish itself within Chinese painting? What were the ethnic identities presented by minority artists from ethnic groups within and outside of China? The materials used for this research include a close visual study of six paintings by Lang Shining (Giuseppe Castiglione) from the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Munich Residenz in Germany and the Musée Guimet in France.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019