Matching Items (107)

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Beyond Books: The Importance of Inclusive and Accessible Library Spaces

Description

Libraries have historical and contemporary importance as public spaces that serve a purpose beyond storing books. In our thesis project, we wanted to ensure that the ASU Library was fulfilling this role for our student community. Based on a survey

Libraries have historical and contemporary importance as public spaces that serve a purpose beyond storing books. In our thesis project, we wanted to ensure that the ASU Library was fulfilling this role for our student community. Based on a survey of 136 members of the Arizona State University community regarding accessibility of the Libraries, the results found that the ASU Library system could benefit from more accessible and digital content and programming. In response to our findings, we created a digital book display which highlighted resources about critical disability studies, the importance of community spaces and libraries in particular, as well as information about universal design. This book display serves as an example of what the future of book displays could be and how to create inclusive spaces in the university Library system.

"Access the project here: https://libguides.asu.edu/BeyondBooks"

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Created

Date Created
2020-12

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The Effect of El Niño Southern Oscillation Phase on Arizona Severe Weather

Description

The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) consists of a linkage between changes in sea-surface temperatures and atmospheric pressure across the Tropical Pacific. ENSO encompasses three phases: neutral events, warm/El Niño events in which sea-surface temperatures are warmer-than-normal and the pressure

The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) consists of a linkage between changes in sea-surface temperatures and atmospheric pressure across the Tropical Pacific. ENSO encompasses three phases: neutral events, warm/El Niño events in which sea-surface temperatures are warmer-than-normal and the pressure gradient decreases across the Equatorial Pacific, and cold/La Niña events in which Tropical Pacific sea-surface temperatures are cooler-than-normal and the pressure gradient increases. Previous studies have determined a connection between variations in ENSO phase and weather patterns across the globe, focusing particularly on surface temperature and precipitation patterns in the United States. However, little research exists that attempts to link changes in ENSO phase with severe weather in Arizona. Therefore, in this study, I analyzed how variations in ENSO phase affect the frequency, intensity, and spatial distribution of four types of severe weather from 1959 to 2016 in Arizona, including a) tornado events, b) severe thunderstorm wind events, c) hail events, and d) heavy rain and flash flood events. I collected data on the Oceanic Niño Index (ONI), a measure of ENSO, as well as storm reports for each severe weather phenomenon dating back to 1959. Then, I analyzed the frequency of each Arizona severe weather event type within each of the twelve annual months and over the entire study period. I also analyzed mean intensity values (Fujita/Enhanced Fujita Scale rating, path width, and path length for tornadoes; hail diameter in millimeters for hail; and wind gust speed for severe thunderstorm wind events) for each severe weather phenomenon, excluding the heavy rain and flash flood events. Finally, I used the Mean Center and Directional Distribution tools in ArcGIS to determine variations in the spatial distribution and mean centers between each ENSO phase for each severe weather event type. I found that ENSO phase, particularly La Niña, does impact the frequency and intensity of tornadoes, hail, thunderstorm wind, and heavy rain/flash flood events in Arizona. However, it appears that ENSO does not affect the spatial distribution of these Arizona severe weather phenomena. These findings attempt to fill in the gap in the literature and could help meteorologists better forecast changes in Arizona severe weather, in turn allowing Arizonans to better prepare for and mitigate the effects of severe weather across the state.

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Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Elderly People and Individuals with Disabilities: An Analysis of the Civil Right to Mobility

Description

Abstract Older adults and people with disabilities are two unique populations, though they intersect in their need for mobility options that are often not met by traditional transportation services. There is consensus that the government should provide assistance for older

Abstract Older adults and people with disabilities are two unique populations, though they intersect in their need for mobility options that are often not met by traditional transportation services. There is consensus that the government should provide assistance for older adults and people with disabilities to achieve and maintain independence. However, the challenge lies in addressing the many forms of mobility inequity. Population projections for the twenty-first century have sparked interest in the rights of these two populations. As the population of the United States of America ages, supporting the mobility of seniors and individuals with disabilities will become imperative to maintaining their quality of life. One existing federal grant, Section 5310: Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities (49 U.S.C. 5310) provides formula funding for services that provide transportation options to older adults and people with disabilities. While the 5310 program provides crucial funding to non-profits and government agencies to support mobility options for older adults and people with disabilities, it does not address the full scope of mobility issues faced by these two communities. This thesis project provides a thorough analysis of this grant from the federal legislation it is founded on, to the local administration of this grant as applied by the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG). Finally, this thesis looks at emerging technology with the potential to revolutionize mobility, along with sobering historical context of the barriers faced older adults and people with disabilities.

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Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Theorizing the 21st Century City: Urban Design through the SETS Framework

Description

As the move towards sustainable urbanism grows, understanding how the city has previously been envisioned and designed will be useful to moving forward. This work examines the legacy of urban design theories, what these theories have implied about what the

As the move towards sustainable urbanism grows, understanding how the city has previously been envisioned and designed will be useful to moving forward. This work examines the legacy of urban design theories, what these theories have implied about what the city should be, and their sustainability consequences. Noticing three prominent urban design visions of the city, the technological city (as proposed in 1922 by Le Corbusier's Ville contemporaine and later in 1933 by his Ville Radieuse (The Radiant City), and in 1935 by Frank Lloyd Wright's' Broadacre City), the social city (as explored in 1961 by Jane Jacobs and in 1976 by Edward Relph of the University of Chicago), and the ecological city (as expounded upon in 1924 by both Lewis Mumford and in 1969 by Ian McHarg), I have newly applied the social-ecological-technical systems framework (SETS) to help classify and analyze these urban design theories and how they have mixed to create hybrid perspectives in more recent urban design theory. Lastly, I have proposed an urban design theory that envisions the sustainable city as an ongoing process. Hopefully, this vision that will hopefully be useful to the future of sustainable development in cities, as will a more organized understanding of urban design theories and their sustainability outcomes.

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Created

Date Created
2018-05

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A Review of the Human Vermiform Appendix and its Proposed Function

Description

Since its discovery in 1524, many people have characterized the vermiform appendix. Charles Darwin considered the human appendix to be a vestige and a useless structure. Others at the time opposed this hypothesis. However, Darwin's hypothesis became prevalent one until

Since its discovery in 1524, many people have characterized the vermiform appendix. Charles Darwin considered the human appendix to be a vestige and a useless structure. Others at the time opposed this hypothesis. However, Darwin's hypothesis became prevalent one until recently when there became a renewed interest in the appendix because of advancements in microscopes, knowledge of the immune system, and phylogenetics. In this review, I will argue that the vermiform appendix, although still not completely understood, has important functions. First, I will give the anatomy of the appendix. I will discuss the comparative anatomy between different animals and also primates. I will address the effects of appendicitis and appendectomy. I will give background on vestigial structures and will discuss if the appendix is a vestige. Following, I will review the evolution of the appendix. Finally, I will argue that the function of the appendix is as an immune organ, including discussion of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), development of lymphoid follicles in GALT and their comparison within different organs, Immunoglobulin A (IgA) function in the gut, biofilms as evidence that the appendix is a safe-house for beneficial bacteria, re-inoculation of the bowel, and protection against recurring infection. I will conclude with future studies that should be conducted to further our understanding of the vermiform appendix.

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Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Applying Arcology: Implementing Paolo Soleri's Vision into Existing Cities

Description

In this project I analyze Paolo Soleri's concept of arcology \u2014 the combination of architecture and ecology \u2014 from a theoretical, symbolic, and physical perspective. I utilize these three viewpoints to determine what aspects of his theories are most effective

In this project I analyze Paolo Soleri's concept of arcology \u2014 the combination of architecture and ecology \u2014 from a theoretical, symbolic, and physical perspective. I utilize these three viewpoints to determine what aspects of his theories are most effective for urban design. While his ideas are based on building "arcologies" from the ground up, I will be using the Phoenix Metropolitan area to determine how we could apply his ideas to existing cities without having to rebuild entirely. This past summer I participated in the 5-week construction workshop the Cosanti Foundation offers at the physical prototypical city of Arcosanti in Mayer, Arizona during which time I studied Soleri's work and participated in the construction of the city while also participating in the community dynamic there. I have found that while not all components of Soleri's theories translated well into Arcosanti, there are certainly some ideas that could be applied help to improve the City of Phoenix. I propose improvements to the pedestrian realm and an increase public space with an emphasis on utilizing the infrastructure and land that is already present for future development.

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Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Assessing Changes in Foredune Morphodynamics after Revegetation in Humboldt Bay, California

Description

Coastal dunes are dynamic landforms that provide the first defense for sea-level rise and coastal flooding. Coastal dunes depend on vegetation to trap and store sediment, which alters beach-dune sediment budgets and foredune morphology. Invasive vegetation species change these patterns

Coastal dunes are dynamic landforms that provide the first defense for sea-level rise and coastal flooding. Coastal dunes depend on vegetation to trap and store sediment, which alters beach-dune sediment budgets and foredune morphology. Invasive vegetation species change these patterns and alter how the system responds to both littoral and aeolian processes. Dynamic restoration is a growing practice whereby plant communities are modified to enhance aeolian processes and help return coastal dune ecosystems to a more ‘natural’ state of ecosystem structure and function. A portion of the foredune system at the Lanphere Dunes in the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge (HBNWR), near Arcata in northern California was targeted for dynamic restoration. The invasive plant species Ammophila arenaria (European beach grass) was removed in August 2015, while native vegetation treatments consisting of combinations of a dune mat forb assemblage and the dune grass Elymus mollis (Sea Lyme-grass) were planted over the summer and over the winter of 2016-17. Four different vegetation regimes were studied consisting of a control plot of A. arenaria two plots of exclusively Dune mat and E. mollis, and then a plot that is the combination if Dune mat and E. mollis. This restoration presented the opportunity to study the patterns of vegetation re-establishment and the related responses in sedimentation and morphological adjustment of the foredune system at both the landform and vegetation plot scales. Bi-annual terrestrial laser scanning surveys and cross-shore transects were used to calculate volumes of sediment change, distinguish patterns of sediment erosion/deposition and discern geomorphic change within different plant cover types. Results suggest that the Dune mat-E. mollis assemblage was most effective a trapping sediment with 96.9% of the plot experiencing deposition over the 17-month observation period, to a spatially averaged depth of +0.16m. During the study, the Dune mat treatment site experienced a landward flattening of its crest and considerable erosion of up to -0.5m around the plants, resulting in a normalized volumetric change of -0.139 m3 m-2. The E. mollis site experienced considerable sediment bypassing on the stoss slope and deposition on the lee slope of the foredune, resulting in accumulation at the toe of the lee slope of +0.6m while base of the lee slope moved 4m landwards. Site morphodynamics and sediment budgets were also influenced by changes in vegetation density and recovery from storm erosion. Longer terms studies could be conducted to investigate responses to vegetation disturbances over a longer temporal scale.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Residential Choice’s Impact on Sustainable Transportation Options: A Study in the Phoenix Metro Area

Description

This study adds to the literature about residential choice and sustainable transportation. Through the interviews and the personal stories gathered, there was diversity shown in the residential location choice process. We also noticed that “commute” means different things to different

This study adds to the literature about residential choice and sustainable transportation. Through the interviews and the personal stories gathered, there was diversity shown in the residential location choice process. We also noticed that “commute” means different things to different households, and that many people did not consider their commute to work to be a primary factor determining their final home location. Moreover, many people were willing to increase their commute time, or trade access to desirable amenities for a longer commute. Commuting time to work was one example of the tradeoffs that homeowners make when choosing a home, but there were also others such as architectural type and access to neighborhood amenities. Lastly, time constraints proved to be a very significant factor in the home buying process. Several of our households had such strict time constraints that limited their search to a point of excluding whole areas. Overall, our study sheds light on transportation’s role in residential choice and underscores the complexity of the location choice process.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Native American Participation in Public Lands Management: An Historical Evaluation

Description

The purpose of this paper is to explore the historical development of Native Americans' participation in public lands management. The literature on federal-tribal relations in public lands management demonstrates that Native Americans face an uphill battle in order to receive

The purpose of this paper is to explore the historical development of Native Americans' participation in public lands management. The literature on federal-tribal relations in public lands management demonstrates that Native Americans face an uphill battle in order to receive recognition of and protection for their cultural and traditional ties to public lands. This paper uses Arnstein's ladder of participation to evaluate several historical examples of federal-tribal relations in public lands management. Arnstein's ladder of participation shows how different forms of participation correspond to an individual or groups power to affect outcomes of decision-making processes. The examples discussed in this paper are explicative of these different forms of participation and show that the predominance of hierarchical power structures and particular cultural ideals of American society have impeded recognition of and protection for Native Americans' cultural and traditional ties to public lands. Around the end of the 19th century and start of the 20th century, forms of nonparticipation excluded Native Americans from the emerging dialogue concerning the nation's first public lands. Although Native Americans became more militant and assertive in the economic, political, and cultural spheres of American society as time went on, tokenistic forms of participation still precluded effective and equitable recognition of and protection for their cultural and traditional ties to public lands. This paper concludes with an evaluation of the recent creation of Bears Ears National Monument by presidential proclamation and how the organization and activism by several tribes to receive protection for the Bears Ears landscape demonstrates the potential for similar approaches to produce more effective and equitable forms of participation.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Fiscal Responsibility and Efficiency as the result, not the objective: A regional e-Governance perspective and framework.

Description

Regional governments provide access to safety, health, and welfare through consistently good services. This analysis examines the underlying motives and mechanisms for achieving these goals. A current trend in governance is to outsource technology software and development to private sector

Regional governments provide access to safety, health, and welfare through consistently good services. This analysis examines the underlying motives and mechanisms for achieving these goals. A current trend in governance is to outsource technology software and development to private sector efficiency. To achieve this claim and in attempt to save money the physical employee workforce is being replaced by technology. The government interaction in this philosophy is not being met with the same diversity and flexibility of the private-sector. This missed opportunity is the result of not accompanying software or governance practices with the principles of entrepreneurship including performance measures, marketing, and collaborative process design. The linkage of these three key principles provides the potential to reinvent government communication and interaction leading to successful endeavors for the public it serves and employees it aims to recruit and retain. This is an applied research thesis with foundation in a working body of regional government. The Maricopa County Planning and Development Department (MCPPD) provided the resources and project objective to discover the root causes of e-Governance challenges. The framing was constructed under recent theoretical trends of New Public Management Theory and Joined-Up Governance approaches to government administration. Extensive data collection was then performed to inform a remedy to these contemporary e-Governance issues. The premise of this thesis is to understand theory and practice of
e-Governance and apply methods to measure and propel that perspective to an operationally adaptable framework applicable to regional government.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05