Matching Items (9)

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Improving Runway Capacity at Minneapolis St. Paul Airport

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Airports are a vital part of the United States' transportation infrastructure. A variety of factors impact the amount of aircraft that an airport can handle per hour. One of these

Airports are a vital part of the United States' transportation infrastructure. A variety of factors impact the amount of aircraft that an airport can handle per hour. One of these factors is the runway capacity. Strict rules regarding the amount of separation required between two aircraft landing at the same airport and lack of available land limit the ways that airport managers and planners can tackle this problem. Research was conducted at the Arizona State University's Simulator Building using the Adacel Tower Simulation System. Modifications to the airport were then made to simulate the high speed exit. Testing utilized aircraft in the large category, including Airbus A320s, which are regularly seen at the airport. Airport capacity dramatically increased as a result. The previous AAR was 33. With the research conducted, aircraft can exit the runway between 27 and 30 seconds with final approach speeds ranging from 130 knots to 150 knots. To allow for a margin for safety, a 35 second runway occupancy time is used. With that rate, assuming that other separation standards are changed to accommodate that traffic level, the runway AAR increases to approximately 100. To reach this potential, changes to the FAAs separation requirements for aircraft on the same final approach course must be made, to allow aircraft to be closer together.

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  • 2016-12

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The Nationalist Crisis: an examination of the rise of Nationalism and shifts in international minority rights through the early twentieth century.

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The 1878 Treaty of Berlin sought to address the issue of minority rights in order to stabilize the interests of the Great Powers and the international order; however, in their

The 1878 Treaty of Berlin sought to address the issue of minority rights in order to stabilize the interests of the Great Powers and the international order; however, in their formulation of a treaty intended to save the imperial component of the system, the European imperial powers not only gave one of their official acknowledgments to nationalist principles, but articulated a critique of the existing notion of state protection for ethnic minorities. This tentative but landmark modification of the imperial model of legitimacy suggested Europe or the world could consist of a host of sovereign nations. In so doing, it recognized the political, and ideological changes that nationalism demanded, changes that would reshape how national groups organize politically, culturally, and militarily. The logic of nationalism demanded that new boundaries, conceived on national lines be drawn, and they were drawn, both within the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires. The Treaty of Berlin led to the formation of Greater Bulgaria and Albania, and these new nationalities formed a initial answer to the European question of minority groups. The Treaty of Berlin is useful to examine in relation to its better-known and much more radical offspring, the Treaty of Versailles. Differences in the approach of either treaty provide a study in the lasting effects of soft power to resolve international conflict. The Great Powers met in Berlin to address a developing crisis in an attempt to avoid a destabilizing regional conflict through diplomatic and legal means, whereas the Paris Peace Conference met at Versailles to develop new order across Europe in the wake of the Great War. The Treaty of Versailles, sharply chiding the Central Powers as it promulgated a victor's peace, hoped to prevent future war by placing economic burdens on Germany. While the conference at Paris acknowledged the minority position, the overwhelming legal focus went to addressing developing nations and nationalisms in a way that was consistent with the beliefs of old imperial rule. The earlier Treaty of Berlin's relative emphasis on minority questions as logically antecedent to the disposition of nationalism becomes of highest significance in retrospect. It is this focused approach to addressing developing nationalism that makes the Treaty of Berlin an important point of discussion. It provides a precedent for how questions of minority rights should be addressed, and where it falls short of an answer on how conflict might be prevented, it explores how the tensions within the international system can exacerbate one another, as they did in the breakdown of diplomacy and law that to the First World War . This thesis aims to address how the triumph of nationalism as a model of state legitimacy almost immediately gave rise to the question of legal protection of minorities. The minority question only became more urgent as nationalists developed policies that practiced first passive, and then active exclusion of minority groups. While nationalism's relation to democratic rule seemed to solve the problems of representative government, it quickly forced the question of how legitimate representation was determined. Shifting notions of political legitimacy, unworkable empires, and heightened international rivalry formed a widening spiral of crisis that eclipsed the minority question, but this thesis supports the belief that the centrifugal force of conflict came out of the avoidance of addressing minority rights completely. Attempts were made through the twentieth century to mitigate conflict between people groups, but many failed to produce fully developed solutions, while many others favored the status quo, seemingly hoping that the question would answer itself. A study of the early history of the minority rights question helps us understand the national question in the old-new light of the international order and questions of international law. Given the conflicts that have arisen out of the relations between nations and the question of minority rights, the minority question is present in much of today's thinking about human rights and the maintenance of international order. Understanding the origins of minority rights and the factors considered in the early negotiations set to address the problem helps develop a deeper understanding of the of the interactions between nations and people today.

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  • 2016-05

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Investigation of FAA Research and Regulation of Insulin-Treated Diabetic Pilots

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The field of study that this topic is derived from constitutes both federal aviation regulation as well as medical and biological sciences. The compelling idea of this thesis is an

The field of study that this topic is derived from constitutes both federal aviation regulation as well as medical and biological sciences. The compelling idea of this thesis is an in depth investigation of the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) regulation and data collection throughout time regarding pilots with Insulin Treated Diabetes Mellitus (ITDM). When in comparison to the continuous evolution of diabetic research and endocrinology in all parts of the world, the regulations regarding this group of pilots seems displaced. This paper explores a chronological order of FAA research and regulations that were conducted on diabetic pilots stemming from 1959 - present. The findings seem to convey that the field of aviation is laden with inconsistencies and misplaced conclusions regarding regulation of insulin-treated diabetic pilots. This paper reflects on the impact of these regulations on this group of pilots from both a biological and medical standpoint as well as from an aviation point of view. In light of advanced medical knowledge, the paper explores what regulations regarding ITDM are in other countries and how FAA regulation should be refined and altered to realign with present day medical knowledge in the United States. This research was conducted to compare the sequential endocrinologic knowledge conducted and the subsequent regulatory actions.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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2014 Phoenix Flight Path Changes: A Good Thing?

Description

Noise abatement is a current and ever-changing issue that leaves some groups satisfied and others dissatisfied. Given that noise is a natural byproduct of aviation, it is the duty of

Noise abatement is a current and ever-changing issue that leaves some groups satisfied and others dissatisfied. Given that noise is a natural byproduct of aviation, it is the duty of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to mitigate noise pollution and the effects that it has on the surrounding community. With the FAA currently progressing to modernize the National Airspace System, communities around the United States have expressed their concerns regarding changes of flight paths, notably the City of Phoenix. Public unrest has increased intensively since the implementation of Performance Based Navigation (PBN) departure procedures in September of 2014. The unrest has allegedly stemmed from a lack of consultation from the Federal Aviation Administration to the City of Phoenix and surrounding communities. Documented complaints have not only been filed by the City, but also by National Prehistoric Preservation areas within the valley. The City of Phoenix and the State of Arizona filed a lawsuit against the FAA to dispute the flight path changes. The court ruled in favor of Arizona and required the FAA to revert to the flight paths that were in place before the changes. This paper is an immersion into the current state of what has occurred within the Phoenix Terminal Airspace (PTA), the effects that the changes have had on the natural and social environment, the FAA, and the NextGen initiative which the FAA is said to be implementing. This paper will also inform the reader of how a departure procedure is created, how the public can stay better informed of what the FAA is planning, and possible long-term solutions that will satisfy both the environmental and modernization requirements placed on the PTA.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

Guiding Aviation Students on How to Effectively Search for Internships

Description

This paper documents the work completed as part of the graduation requirements from Barrett, The Honors College. My project focused on researching, organizing, and presenting information to other ASU aviation

This paper documents the work completed as part of the graduation requirements from Barrett, The Honors College. My project focused on researching, organizing, and presenting information to other ASU aviation students for the purpose of guiding them in how to effectively search for internships. My internship experiences led to a full-time job offer and this project aims to help provide other aviation students with the same opportunities.

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  • 2018-05

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New Barrett Poly Lounge and Residence Space: Research and Analysis of Student Preferences

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Abstract:
As Barrett Polytechnic moves into the final stages of planning for the new residential hall, currently under construction on the Polytechnic campus, it is important that they have the

Abstract:
As Barrett Polytechnic moves into the final stages of planning for the new residential hall, currently under construction on the Polytechnic campus, it is important that they have the student voice in mind when making final decisions. Past research has shown that students who live on campus have a higher retention rate not only through their first year, but onto graduation. Research has also found that students who live on campus become more involved in the community and use more of the university’s resources. Seeing that Barrett prides itself on being a community of scholars, proper use of student feedback should be used to prepare the new building for its students. Data was collected via a survey and focus group, focused primarily on what the students would like to see in their new space. Once collected and analyzed it was apparent that students were really concerned with a few aspects of the new residential building and lounge space.
Using the analyzed data, the following recommendations were made:
1. Reevaluation of the student residential experience after the move to the new residential building.
2. Revaluation of accessibility to the mentorship opportunities after the move to the residential building, as well as an increased movement by Barrett to foster these relationships
3. Addition of quantity of computers as well as newer technology, addition of whiteboards and charging stations, and ensuring there is proper group and individual workstations.
4. Consideration of what students use the lounge for and how to best set up the space for those uses.
5. More advertisement of the Barrett Polytechnic library as well as an more research to determine whether or not improving the library would encourage more use.
6. Make steps to keep the lounge open later in the evenings as well as ensuring students, both on and off campus, have access to the lounge amenities when they need them most.

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  • 2020-05

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The Airline Industry: How the Pandemic Has and Continues to Reshape the Industry as We Know It

Description

September 11th, 2001 was a day that affected everyone. The world came to a stop. The aviation industry was affected, and the national airspace system was closed for a few

September 11th, 2001 was a day that affected everyone. The world came to a stop. The aviation industry was affected, and the national airspace system was closed for a few days. The events that occurred on that specific day enacted changes that affect the industry to this day. This paper analyzes some of the changes that were made and discusses some of the changes the industry is going through again, about 20 years after the events on September 11th. The coronavirus pandemic has changed the way we all live our daily lives and aviation is not exempt. Changes to aircraft cleaning procedures, boarding processes, and seat design have all been ways the industry has gone through changes. The results of a potential recovery as well as the long-term changes are discussed.

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  • 2021-05

Know Go: Developing a Pilot Training Application

Description

Checklists have become a vital aspect of aviation, regardless of skill level. From general aviation pilots going through flight training to commercial airline pilots responsible for hundreds of lives every

Checklists have become a vital aspect of aviation, regardless of skill level. From general aviation pilots going through flight training to commercial airline pilots responsible for hundreds of lives every day, checklists are used from the moment you step into the cockpit until the last light that is turned off at the end of the flight. Checklists are such a significant part of aviation, and several different ways to run a checklist have been created (such as the challenge-response and do-and-tell methods). Despite these variations in checklist usage and procedures, all methods are restricted in terms of user involvement; in other words, pilots are not easily engaged or invested in the checklists that they use in day to day operations. Theorized through exposure to this issue as a student and as a Certified Flight Instructor, Know Go™ has been created as a long term tool to replace conventional checklists with a resourceful one that acts as both a normal checklist for daily use and a learning tool for long term retention. The purpose of this text is to introduce the capabilities of the application, as well as discuss the theories behind the effectiveness of the application. The developmental processes and the challenges associated with application production will also be analyzed.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Navigating the Airport Environment at Night: An Analysis of Pilot Confusion

Description

The statistical significance of airport environment incidents related to pilot confusion at night was explored. Some articles suggest there is a higher rate of incidents during the day than during

The statistical significance of airport environment incidents related to pilot confusion at night was explored. Some articles suggest there is a higher rate of incidents during the day than during the night, while others suggest any low visibility environment will a greater processing time for the brain to react to outside references. Other researchers suggest incidents are not tied to time of day but to time spent looking inside the cockpit compared to outside the cockpit. Using this research and an analyzation of incident reports collected by the Aviation Safety Reporting System, this paper suggests there is a statistically significant relationship between incidents involving pilot confusion on the surface and time of day.

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  • 2019-05