Matching Items (2)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

147988-Thumbnail Image.png

Isotopic Analysis of Nova Stardust Grains

Description

Stardust grains can provide useful information about the Solar System environment before the Sun was born. Stardust grains show distinct isotopic compositions that indicate their origins, like the atmospheres of red giant stars, asymptotic giant branch stars, and supernovae (e.g.,

Stardust grains can provide useful information about the Solar System environment before the Sun was born. Stardust grains show distinct isotopic compositions that indicate their origins, like the atmospheres of red giant stars, asymptotic giant branch stars, and supernovae (e.g., Bose et al. 2010). It has been argued that some stardust grains likely condensed in classical nova outbursts (e.g., Amari et al. 2001). These nova candidate grains contain 13C, 15N and 17O-rich nuclides which are produced by proton burning. However, these nuclides alone cannot constrain the stellar source of nova candidate grains. Nova ejecta is rich in 7Be that decays to 7Li (which has a half-life of ~53 days). I want to measure 6,7Li isotopes in nova candidate grains using the NanoSIMS 50L (nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry) to establish their nova origins without ambiguity. Several stardust grains that are nova candidate grains were identified in meteorite Acfer 094 on the basis of their oxygen isotopes. The identified silicate and oxide stardust grains are <500 nm in size and exist in the meteorite surrounded by meteoritic silicates. Therefore, 6,7Li isotopic measurements on these grains are hindered because of the large 300-500 nm oxygen ion beam in the NanoSIMS. I devised a methodology to isolate stardust grains by performing Focused Ion Beam milling with the FIB – Nova 200 NanoLab (FEI) instrument. We proved that the current FIB instrument cannot be used to prepare stardust grains smaller than 1 𝜇m due to lacking capabilities of the FIB. For future analyses, we could either use the same milling technique with the new and improved FIB – Helios 5 UX or use the recently constructed duoplasmatron on the NanoSIMS that can achieve a size of ~75 nm oxygen ion beam.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

148230-Thumbnail Image.png

The Effect of Varying Mass Loss Rate on the Initial-Final Mass Relation of Massive Stars

Description

Stellar mass loss has a high impact on the overall evolution of a star. The amount<br/>of mass lost during a star’s lifetime dictates which remnant will be left behind and how<br/>the circumstellar environment will be affected. Several rates of mass

Stellar mass loss has a high impact on the overall evolution of a star. The amount<br/>of mass lost during a star’s lifetime dictates which remnant will be left behind and how<br/>the circumstellar environment will be affected. Several rates of mass loss have been<br/>proposed for use in stellar evolution codes, yielding discrepant results from codes using<br/>different rates. In this paper, I compare the effect of varying the mass loss rate in the<br/>stellar evolution code TYCHO on the initial-final mass relation. I computed four sets of<br/>models with varying mass loss rates and metallicities. Due to a large number of models<br/>reaching the luminous blue variable stage, only the two lower metallicity groups were<br/>considered. Their mass loss was analyzed using Python. Luminosity, temperature, and<br/>radius were also compared. The initial-final mass relation plots showed that in the 1/10<br/>solar metallicity case, reducing the mass loss rate tended to increase the dependence of final mass on initial mass. The limited nature of these results implies a need for further study into the effects of using different mass loss rates in the code TYCHO.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05