Matching Items (4)

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Instructional choices, student participation, and the construction of knowledge in a social studies learning environment

Description

The purpose of this action research study was to explore the impact instructional choices had on student participation in the classroom learning environment, growth of knowledge in social studies, and

The purpose of this action research study was to explore the impact instructional choices had on student participation in the classroom learning environment, growth of knowledge in social studies, and self-efficacy in the learning process. The instructional choices implemented through a flipped learning instructional approach were designed to target motivation and participation in the learning process via individualized student-learning opportunities. This action research study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of collaborative student-centered learning environments to traditional instructional style learning environments. This study provided students with opportunities to analyze, think critically of, and apply studied content in a Participation in Government course to their personal lives through experiential out-of-class assignments and collaborative hands-on in-class activities. The theoretical foundations for this study include social cognitive theory, theory of self-efficacy, and social constructivism. Participants included 32 high school seniors from the High School of Fashion Industries in New York, NY. Participants completed a pre-/post-self-efficacy survey, pre/posttest measuring their knowledge of government, and several short interviews. Eight participants, four from the Treatment group and four from the Control group, completed a semi-structured interview at the conclusion of the study. Results showed participants experienced an increase in self-efficacy and participation in the learning process. Participants from the Treatment group outperformed the participants from the Control group with regards to knowledge of government. In the discussion, outcomes related to the theoretical frameworks and the problem of practice were discussed. Finally, limitations and a discussion regarding future iterations of the action research in a larger context were outlined.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Fostering Creative Compassion in Honors Students Through Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and Mindfulness

Description

This quasi-experimental, concurrent, mixed method, action research study sought to evaluate how an elective 1-credit course informed by mindfulness and culturally sustaining pedagogy influenced honors students’ academic self-efficacy, self-compassion, and

This quasi-experimental, concurrent, mixed method, action research study sought to evaluate how an elective 1-credit course informed by mindfulness and culturally sustaining pedagogy influenced honors students’ academic self-efficacy, self-compassion, and their meaning-making about what it means to be an honors student. Theoretical perspectives and research guiding the study included: academic self-efficacy, culturally sustaining pedagogy, mindfulness, and third space. Drawing from these perspectives, the 9-week Creative Compassion course utilized poetry and rap as a way to enact culturally sustaining pedagogy and also as a vehicle for students to practice mindfulness. Findings from quantitative data from pre- and post- surveys of a treatment and control population, as well as qualitative data (open-ended survey questions, focus groups, and student artifacts) from the treatment population are presented here. This study revealed the following: practices informed by culturally sustaining pedagogy positively impacted students’ mindfulness, these same practices allowed for the creation of a third space within the classroom, and improving student self-compassion should be an increased priority. Additional implications for research and practice are also presented.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Professional development and teacher self-efficacy in supporting students with special needs

Description

The purpose of the Inclusive Instruction Program (IIP) action research study was to explore the potential relationship between a new professional development cluster and general education teacher self-efficacy in supporting

The purpose of the Inclusive Instruction Program (IIP) action research study was to explore the potential relationship between a new professional development cluster and general education teacher self-efficacy in supporting students with special needs. The IIP was designed to address teacher areas of needs as identified in a prior cycle of action research. During the needs assessment cycle, teachers suggested that they needed help with differentiation, behavior management, collaboration, and progress monitoring. As a result of this information, the IIP study workshops were developed around these topics. The study was grounded in a constructivist framework with aspects of self-efficacy and sensemaking theories being explored. The literature review includes studies centered on professional development for teachers in special education related topics. The IIP study participants included 11 fourth through sixth grade general education teachers. Participants completed a presurvey, attended four workshops over the course of six weeks, and completed a postsurvey. Before each workshop participants wrote journal reflections, and after each of the workshops participants completed feedback forms. Six of the 11 study participants were randomly selected to complete 30-minute individual interviews. The results of the study indicated that providing participants with professional development in special education related topics did increase their self-efficacy. Additionally, study findings revealed that participants made sense of their professional learning with individual reflection and collaboration with peers and administration to further discuss and integrate into their individual practice.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Faculty Mentoring in an Academic Success Program

Description

ABSTRACT

Over the past decades, there has been growth in student academic success programs in institutions of higher learning. However, with this growth instructors in these programs have not always been

ABSTRACT

Over the past decades, there has been growth in student academic success programs in institutions of higher learning. However, with this growth instructors in these programs have not always been prepared to teach courses focused on supporting student academic success. The purpose of this study was to understand the role that mentoring plays in the performance of new faculty in the Success Courses department at Arizona State University. The guiding questions of the study examined the degree to which mentoring affected instructors’ efficacy in implementing the core tenets of the Success Courses Department and the features of the mentoring program that new instructors found useful. I used an action research, mixed method approach with focus groups, interviews, and surveys serving as data collection tools. The participants in the study were new department faculty mentees who taught for the Success Courses department at ASU in the fall of 2018. The quantitative data suggested that the faculty mentoring program helped new instructors improve their understanding of their students and the classroom environment. The qualitative findings indicated that faculty mentoring provided overall support, enhanced preparedness to deliver course content, created opportunities for professional growth and development, and supported positive relationships and collaboration. The faculty mentoring program enhanced the development of relationships between mentors and mentees, which is important for assisting new instructors as they seek to address individual challenges related to their teaching practices.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019