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Data Analytics to Identify the Genetic Basis for Resilience to Temperature Stress in Soybeans

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This paper explores the ability to predict yields of soybeans based on genetics and environmental factors. Based on the biology of soybeans, it has been shown that yields are best when soybeans grow within a certain temperature range. The event

This paper explores the ability to predict yields of soybeans based on genetics and environmental factors. Based on the biology of soybeans, it has been shown that yields are best when soybeans grow within a certain temperature range. The event a soybean is exposed to temperature outside their accepted range is labeled as an instance of stress. Currently, there are few models that use genetic information to predict how crops may respond to stress. Using data provided by an agricultural business, a model was developed that can categorically label soybean varieties by their yield response to stress using genetic data. The model clusters varieties based on their yield production in response to stress. The clustering criteria is based on variance distribution and correlation. A logistic regression is then fitted to identify significant gene markers in varieties with minimal yield variance. Such characteristics provide a probabilistic outlook of how certain varieties will perform when planted in different regions. Given changing global climate conditions, this model demonstrates the potential of using data to efficiently develop and grow crops adjusted to climate changes.

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Date Created
2018-05

Reproductive Cheating in Harvester Ants - An Agent Based Model

Description

Pogonomyrmex californicus (a species of harvester ant) colonies typically have anywhere from one to five queens. A queen can control the ratio of female to male offspring she produces, field research indicating that this ratio is genetically hardwired and does

Pogonomyrmex californicus (a species of harvester ant) colonies typically have anywhere from one to five queens. A queen can control the ratio of female to male offspring she produces, field research indicating that this ratio is genetically hardwired and does not change over time relative to other queens. Further, a queen has an individual reproductive advantage if she has a small reproductive ratio. A colony, however, has a reproductive advantage if it has queens with large ratios, as these queens produce many female workers to further colony success. We have developed an agent-based model to analyze the "cheating" phenotype observed in field research, in which queens extend their lifespans by producing disproportionately many male offspring. The model generates phenotypes and simulates years of reproductive cycles. The results allow us to examine the surviving phenotypes and determine conditions under which a cheating phenotype has an evolutionary advantage. Conditions generating a bimodal steady state solution would indicate a cheating phenotype's ability to invade a cooperative population.

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Date Created
2017-05