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Bridging the Gap Through Collaboration: The ASU Library Barrett Honors College Peer Mentor Program

Description

The transforming skills that lead to exceptional academic results are writing and research. While it is the role of academic librarians to provide the appropriate resources to facilitate research, arguably students are more willing to rely on their fellow students

The transforming skills that lead to exceptional academic results are writing and research. While it is the role of academic librarians to provide the appropriate resources to facilitate research, arguably students are more willing to rely on their fellow students than professional library assistance. At Arizona State University’s Barrett, The Honors College, trained and motivated students are serving as Peer Mentors who assist student research needs without the "stigma" of asking a Librarian for help.

The panel discusses and elucidate components of a student-to-student peer program and cover comprehensive planning aspects of personnel, communication and workflow methodologies, interdisciplinary representation, and competency building activities. They will share training and work protocols, focusing on the evolution of the program from conceptualization through implementation. The presentation is an interactive conversation between the panelists (covering varying aspects and perspectives of the program) and the audience.

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2019-10-31

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Collaborating Externally and Training Internally to Support Research Data Services

Description

The ASU Library is actively building relationships around and increasing its expertise in research data services. We have established a collaboration with our university’s research administration in order to coordinate our distinct areas of expertise in research data services so

The ASU Library is actively building relationships around and increasing its expertise in research data services. We have established a collaboration with our university’s research administration in order to coordinate our distinct areas of expertise in research data services so that both entities can better support researchers all the way through the research data lifecycle. The Library embedded itself into research administration’s learning management system and works with their research advancement officers to engage with researchers and staff we have not traditionally reached. Forging this new collaboration increased expectations that the Library will expand existing research data services to more investigators, so we have grown Library professionals’ internal competencies by providing research data management training opportunities to meet these demands. In addition, the Library’s Research Services Working Group established data competencies, workflows, and trainings so more librarians gain skills necessary to answer and assist patrons with data needs. Greater expertise throughout the Library enables us to authentically and confidently scale our research data services and form new collaborations.
The substance of this article is based upon a lightning talk given at RDAP Summit 2019.

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2019-12-18

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Getting to the Core of Services: Considering the Arizona State University Library as a Core Facility

Description

As academic libraries focus on delivering new services in such areas as research data, digital preservation, and data curation, they have begun to explore alternative funding models and approaches to research. The Arizona State University (ASU) Library in Tempe works

As academic libraries focus on delivering new services in such areas as research data, digital preservation, and data curation, they have begun to explore alternative funding models and approaches to research. The Arizona State University (ASU) Library in Tempe works with the university's Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development to collaborate and support ASU's researchers at scale. The library's ongoing collaboration and its specialized services, consultations, and training have led it to consider becoming a core facility, a centralized service that would provide consultation and other help to the university's researchers. As a core facility, the library would gain the ability to fund new initiatives and functions that would expand its reach and improve its support for research.

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2019-10

Carlos Montezuma’s Wassaja Newsletter: Access, Engagement, and Collaboration

Description

In 2014/2015, Arizona State University (ASU) Libraries, the Labriola National American Indian Data Center, and the ASU American Indian Studies Department completed an ASU Institute for Humanities Research (IHR) seed grant entitled “Carlos Montezuma’s Wassaja Newsletter: Digitization, Access and Context”

In 2014/2015, Arizona State University (ASU) Libraries, the Labriola National American Indian Data Center, and the ASU American Indian Studies Department completed an ASU Institute for Humanities Research (IHR) seed grant entitled “Carlos Montezuma’s Wassaja Newsletter: Digitization, Access and Context” to digitize all ASU held issues of the newsletter Wassaja Freedom’s Signal for the Indian, which Yavapai activist-intellectual Carlos Montezuma, MD (1866-1923) self-published during 1916-1922. The grant team additionally selected a portion of the ASU Libraries Carlos Montezuma archival collection for digitization to provide a more complete picture of Dr. Carlos Montezuma’s life and work.

The ASU grant team produced a searchable online collection on the ASU Digital Repository and created an online exhibition in conjunction with the IHR Nexus Lab’s Developing Wassaja Project. The Nexus Lab’s role at ASU is to grow the digital humanities through interdisciplinary collaborations bringing together humanities, science, and technology. The Nexus Lab partnered with the grant team to create the Developing Wassaja Project which provided an opportunity for faculty, staff, and students at ASU to engage in electronic publication through web application development.

The resulting web platform, Wassaja: A Carlos Montezuma Project, provides context for this digitized collection and facilitates community interaction, including a partnership with Dr. Montezuma’s home community the Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation. In this webcast, Digital Projects Librarian Matthew Harp, Developing Wassaja Project team member Joe Buenker (subject librarian), and grant team member Joyce Martin (librarian and curator of the Labriola National American Indian Data Center) will discuss and demonstrate the resources created and the resulting partnership with the Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation. The webcast will focus on identifying collaborators and needed skills to engage in Digital Humanities research and on identifying the stages of a collaborative project.

Participants will gain insight on working directly with diverse communities; overcoming technical limitations of traditional institutional repositories; collaborative strategies with faculty, research centers, and cultural heritage societies; solutions for moving hidden collections into an engaging digital exhibition; integrating digital humanities research and instruction with library curation; and preparing for long term costs and management issues.

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2016-03-23

It Takes a Village: Implementing a Homegrown Solution for Streaming Video Resources

Description

Limited to streaming only those videos a vendor hosted, ASU Libraries sought to expand collection options with a trial project for hosting content locally. Kaltura, was selected as the platform, but Kaltura does not work out of the box. This

Limited to streaming only those videos a vendor hosted, ASU Libraries sought to expand collection options with a trial project for hosting content locally. Kaltura, was selected as the platform, but Kaltura does not work out of the box. This presentation will cover how using Drupal, along with Kaltura, we built a working video hosting solution. The presentation will cover administrative hurdles, stumbling blocks, pitfalls, enhancements, and lessons learned along the way.

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2012-06-25

Developing Applied Projects Collections in an Institutional Repository: Challenges & Benefits

Description

While PhD dissertations are typically accessible many other terminal degree projects remain invisible and inaccessible to a greater audience. Over the past year and a half, librarians at Arizona State University collaborated with faculty and departmental administrators across a variety

While PhD dissertations are typically accessible many other terminal degree projects remain invisible and inaccessible to a greater audience. Over the past year and a half, librarians at Arizona State University collaborated with faculty and departmental administrators across a variety of fields to develop and create institutional repository collections that highlight and authoritatively share this type of student scholarship with schools, researchers, and future employers. This poster will present the benefits, challenges, and considerations required to successfully implement and manage these collections of applied final projects or capstone projects. Specifically, issues/challenges related to metadata consistency, faculty buy-in, and developing an ingest process, as well as benefits related to increased visibility and improved educational and employment opportunities will be discussed. This interactive presentation will also discuss lessons learned from the presenter’s experiences in context of how they can easily apply to benefit their respective institutions.

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2017-05-02

Implementing Research Discovery Through SHARE

Description

This presentation highlights SHARE’s ongoing initiatives as a free, open data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle. It includes information about the SHARE open technology and the ongoing community contributions. A variety of data set use

This presentation highlights SHARE’s ongoing initiatives as a free, open data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle. It includes information about the SHARE open technology and the ongoing community contributions. A variety of data set use cases and their implementation will be described to allow others to apply similar tools and techniques to their home institution or organization. SHARE aggregates free, open metadata about scholarship that includes proposals, registrations, data, publications, and more from more than 125 sources including ASU.

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2017-04-19

What’s the Deal with Data?

Description

You’ve probably heard a lot of “futurists” talk about data, but it’s not always clear how data relate to our day to day work in libraries.

Why are data important, and what’s the big deal? Data are not just spreadsheets and

You’ve probably heard a lot of “futurists” talk about data, but it’s not always clear how data relate to our day to day work in libraries.

Why are data important, and what’s the big deal? Data are not just spreadsheets and numbers, but come in many different shapes, colors, and flavors! In this presentation, we will give an introduction to data, talk about why it is relevant, and demonstrate how to and use data in practical situations. We will also provide innovative examples that will inspire you to connect with your colleagues and patrons!

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2016-10-20

Practical Preservation for Everyone: Why Digital Preservation Matters to You and Your Community

Description

Digital technology has enabled us to record and share our memories and histories faster and in greater numbers than previously imagined. However digital files rely on hardware, software, and descriptive information to be used. As formats change and equipment to

Digital technology has enabled us to record and share our memories and histories faster and in greater numbers than previously imagined. However digital files rely on hardware, software, and descriptive information to be used. As formats change and equipment to read them goes out of use we are all challenged to connect our present to our future. How long do you want your digital files to last? Decades or even a few years from now will you still be able to access and enjoy those pictures, documents and other digital items you create today?

Libraries, museums and archives spend countless hours and resources preserving physical items from the past and present, but may be forfeiting the longevity of our digital work and connecting to future generations through unintended neglect. Using practical examples and employing best practices of research institutions, participants will learn important first steps to digital preservation including the importance of metadata to personal history, recommended file formats, and approaches they can immediately use to ensure the work they create today will still be enjoyed tomorrow. Help yourself, your organization, and your patrons continue to connect their digital heritage to the generations yet to come.

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2015-11-20

The Library Minute: Creating Short and Effective Outreach Videos

Description

The Arizona State University Libraries’ fun Library Minute video series brings information about resource and services to a large student body. For the first time, we present a workshop walking through the entire production process from start to finish and

The Arizona State University Libraries’ fun Library Minute video series brings information about resource and services to a large student body. For the first time, we present a workshop walking through the entire production process from start to finish and offering suggestions on how to fit multimedia into your marketing and outreach strategy. In this session, we will produce a short video with participants in three steps:

1. Conceptualization and Planning.
2. Recording.
3. Editing and Distribution.

Digital Production Manger Matthew Harp will demonstrate the tools and process and elaborate on the use of social media, YouTube, and the Internet Archive in the distribution plan. Together with Mimmo Bonanni and Library Minute Host Anali Perry, we’ll share our tips and tricks for video production using whatever resources are available.

Presented at the 2011 Arizona Library Association Conference 2011 - Tucson, Arizona

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2011-11-08