Matching Items (4)

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The relationship between clinical experience, emotional intelligence and counselor self-efficacy with resilience as a moderator

Description

Emotions are essential ingredients to the human experience. How one feels influences how one thinks and behaves. The processing capacity for emotion-related information can be thought of as emotional

Emotions are essential ingredients to the human experience. How one feels influences how one thinks and behaves. The processing capacity for emotion-related information can be thought of as emotional intelligence (Salovey & Mayer, 1997). Regulating emotions and coping with emotional experiences are among the most common reasons individuals seek counseling. Counselors must be uniquely equipped in processing and managing emotional content. Counselor’s skills and abilities related to emotional intelligence are vital to effective counseling. There is indication that confidence in one’s counseling skills may be equally as important as competence in these skills. Counselor self-efficacy, one’s belief in one’s ability to perform counseling activities, has been shown to relate to counselor performance and ability and increased clinical experience has been associated with higher levels of counselor self-efficacy (Larson & Daniels, 1998). One’s emotion-related information processing abilities and one’s clinical experiences may contribute to one’s perception of one’s competencies and abilities as a counselor.

However, this relationship may not be a simple cause-and-effect association. Individuals may possess a certain aptitude (emotional intelligence) and not perceive themselves as competent as counselors. Resilience, one’s ability to “bounce-back” and persevere through adversity may moderate the relation between emotional intelligence and counselor self-efficacy (Wagnild, 1990).

The current study explored the relations among clinical experience, emotional intelligence and resilience in predicting self-efficacy. In addition, whether resilience would moderate the relationship between emotional intelligence and counselor self-efficacy was examined. Eighty counselor trainees enrolled in CACREP-accredited master’s programs participated in this study online. They completed a demographics form, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT; Mayer, et al., 2002), the Counselor Activities Self-Efficacy Scales (CASES; Lent et al., 2003), and The Resilience Scale (RS; Wagnild & Young, 1993). Multiple hierarchical regressions revealed clinical experience (specifically a completed practicum), emotional intelligence, and resilience predicted counselor self-efficacy. The moderation was not significant. These findings support the value of the exploration of clinical experience, emotional intelligence and resilience in developing counselor self-efficacy. A more comprehensive discussion of the findings, limitations, and implications of the current study as well as suggested direction for future research are discussed herein.

Contributors

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Postpartum adaptation and competence of mothers who use hypnosis to birth

Description

This qualitative study investigated the postpartum experiences of mothers who used hypnosis to birth. This research project was based on a constructivist version of Grounded Theory. Qualitative inquiry and analysis

This qualitative study investigated the postpartum experiences of mothers who used hypnosis to birth. This research project was based on a constructivist version of Grounded Theory. Qualitative inquiry and analysis were conducted on 15 semi-structured interviews; two pilot interviews were also conducted. Phone and in-person interviews were completed with Caucasian, Hispanic, and multiracial mothers who were between one month and 15 months postpartum. The following 12 major themes emerged: bonded with child, development of self-efficacy, breastfeeding success, family criticism, online support, impact on family, practice effect, amazement to misevaluation, induction overwhelm, holistic benefits, minimal post partum depression, and birth stories. Mothers of two or more children appreciated birth more, reported an increased sense of calm and closeness within their nuclear and extended family, believed that the benefits of hypnosis for birthing assisted in the areas of bonding with their newborn, self-efficacy, breastfeeding and overall postpartum success. First-time mothers appreciated the physical aspect of recovery after delivery. They emphasized the birth narrative despite cultural differences in sharing their stories. Although they attributed much success to the use of hypnosis for birthing, they tended to make more indirect attributions to the bond with their child, self-efficacy, breastfeeding, and overall postpartum success. Mothers who required a c-section, epidural, or induction during birth experienced feelings of guilt and viewed hypnosis as an isolated tool for birth and a tool to reduce guilt and stress postpartum. Mothers who birthed naturally used hypnosis postpartum in more ways. Hispanic mothers expressed greater difficulty with balancing their roles as a career woman and mother. They had different expectations around the participation of their partner during birth preparation and postpartum. Breastfeeding was most important to this group and reflected communal values. Hypnosis for birthing was described as being helpful for mothers who had a psychological history with depression, anxiety, or trauma. Participants reported overall effectiveness of hypnosis for birthing methods despite mixed reactions from birthing professionals, family, and friends. The importance of these findings for counseling psychology is discussed.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Moving towards a comprehensive understanding of multicultural counseling competence: the role of diversity cognitive complexity

Description

This study explored several training variables that may contribute to counseling trainees' multicultural counseling self-efficacy and multicultural case conceptualization ability. Specifically, this study aimed to examine the cognitive processes that

This study explored several training variables that may contribute to counseling trainees' multicultural counseling self-efficacy and multicultural case conceptualization ability. Specifically, this study aimed to examine the cognitive processes that contribute to multicultural counseling competence (MCC) outcome variables. Clinical experience, multicultural knowledge, and multicultural awareness are assumed to provide the foundation for the development of these outcome variables. The role of how a counselor trainee utilizes this knowledge and awareness in working with diverse populations has not been explored. Diversity cognitive complexity (DCC) quantifies the process by which a counselor thinks about different elements of diversity in a multidimensional manner. The current study examined the role of DCC on the relationship between training variables of direct clinical experience with diverse populations, multicultural knowledge, and multicultural awareness and the two training outcomes (multicultural counseling self-efficacy and multicultural case conceptualization ability). A total of one hundred and sixty-one graduate trainees participated in the study. A series of hypotheses were tested to examine the impact of DCC on the relationship between MCC predictors (multicultural knowledge, multicultural awareness, and direct contact hours with diverse clinical populations) and two MCC outcomes: multicultural counseling self-efficacy and multicultural case conceptualization ability. Hierarchical regression analyses were utilized to test whether DCC mediated or moderated the relationship between the predictors and the outcome variables. Multicultural knowledge and clinical hours with diverse populations were significant predictors of multicultural counseling self-efficacy. Multicultural awareness was a significant predictor of multicultural case conceptualization ability. Diversity cognitive complexity was not a significantly related to any predictor or outcome variable, thus all hypotheses tested were rejected. The results of the current study support graduate programs emphasizing counselor trainees gaining multicultural knowledge and awareness as well as direct clinical experience with diverse clinical populations in an effort to foster MCC. Although diversity cognitive complexity was not significantly related to the predictor or outcome variables in this study, further research is warranted to determine the validity of the measure used to assess DCC. The findings in this study support the need for further research exploring training variables that contribute to multicultural counseling outcomes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Patterns of coping: differences between Latina and non-Hispanic white ADRD caregivers

Description

While the literature on caregivers of loved ones with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders (ADRD) has continued to grow, the relationship of ethnicity and acculturation factors with regards to the

While the literature on caregivers of loved ones with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders (ADRD) has continued to grow, the relationship of ethnicity and acculturation factors with regards to the coping strategies used by caregivers has not been extensively explored. The current study included participants from the Palo Alto site of the Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregiver Health (REACH) project. The study examined differences in coping strategies between 140 non-Hispanic White, 45 less acculturated Latina, and 61 more acculturated Latina caregivers. Univariate and Multivariate Analysis of Variance, as well as post hoc analyses, were conducted to determine the differences among the three groups. Results indicated less acculturated Latina caregivers employ more avoidant coping strategies compared to non-Hispanic White caregivers. However, no differences were found among the other groups in their use of avoidance coping. Moreover, there were no differences found in the use of social support seeking, count your blessings, problem focused, and blaming others coping among the three groups. These findings have important implications for the design of culturally relevant psychoeducational and therapeutic interventions aimed towards meeting the individual needs of these three populations. In addition, the findings expand on the understanding of maladaptive coping strategies that may be potentially exacerbating caregiver distress among Latina caregivers.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011