Matching Items (2)

127608-Thumbnail Image.png

Classroom Observation Ability Among Pre-Service Music Educators in Greece

Description

The purpose of this study was to examine the classroom observation ability of pre-service music teachers in Greece (N = 62). Two groups of undergraduates, one near the beginning and

The purpose of this study was to examine the classroom observation ability of pre-service music teachers in Greece (N = 62). Two groups of undergraduates, one near the beginning and one near the end of a two-year course sequence in teaching methods that included in-class and in-school training in observation ("juniors" and "seniors," respectively), observed videotapes of one elementary (4th grade) and one secondary (8th grade) general music class, each being taught by its own expert music teacher. Subjects wrote comments that judges classified into subcategories within overall categories of lesson, teacher, and students. Results largely confirmed those of previous research from the USA, with the more experienced subjects making significantly more comments and both groups focusing more on teachers than on lessons or students. There were also differences between subcategories and significant intersections involving experience level and sex of the subjects.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2010-02

127670-Thumbnail Image.png

Plato's Views on Three Modes of Music Education Praxis: Composing, Performing, and Listening

Description

Some ancient Greek perspectives on three praxial musical activities: composing, performing, and listening. Early founders of modern Western thought created boundaries and hierarchies among these three activities, in addition to

Some ancient Greek perspectives on three praxial musical activities: composing, performing, and listening. Early founders of modern Western thought created boundaries and hierarchies among these three activities, in addition to the scientific study of music. Under the dualistic conception of reality, or "truth," original musical works became objects. Plato stipulated the use of "good" songs, reserved composition for a select few, and believed that "goodness" in music could be determined objectively by society's leaders, a form of universal "truth" represented in artistic products. The praxis of music performing, regarded as a "practiced habit" and given lower status than composing, was deemed an appropriate leisure-time activity for gentlemen. Virtuoso music performance was to be left to non-citizens, leaving citizens free for more intellectual pursuits. . . . [I]t is no surprising that subsequent educators taught music primarily through theoretical means. . . .

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2007