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Cloning and expression of antigen-specific T cell receptors

Description

Cancer poses a significant burden on the global health system and represents a leading cause of death worldwide. For late-stage cancers, the traditional treatments of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery are not always viable, and they can pose unnecessary health risks

Cancer poses a significant burden on the global health system and represents a leading cause of death worldwide. For late-stage cancers, the traditional treatments of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery are not always viable, and they can pose unnecessary health risks to the patients. New immunotherapies, such as adoptive cell transfer, are being developed and refined to treat such cancers. T cell immunotherapies in particular, where a patient’s T cell lymphocytes are isolated and amplified to be re-infused into the patient or where human cell lines are engineered to express T cell receptors for the recognition of common cancer antigens, are being expanded on because for some cancers, they could be the only option. Constructing an optimal pipeline for cloning and expression of antigen-specific TCRs has significant bearing on the efficacy of engineered cell lines for ACT. Adoptive T cell transfer, while making great strides, has to overcome a diverse T cell repertoire – cloning and expressing antigen-specific TCRs can mediate this understanding. Having identified the high frequency FluM1-specific TCR sequences in stimulated donor PBMCs, it was hypothesized that the antigen-specific TCR could be reconstructed via Gateway cloning methods and tested for expression and functionality. Establishing this pipeline would confirm an ability to properly pair and express the heterodimeric chains. In the context of downstream applications, neoantigens would be used to stimulate T cells, the α and β chains would be paired via single-cell or bulk methods, and instead of Gateway cloning, the CDR3 hypervariable regions α and β chains alone would be co-expressed using Golden Gate assembly methods.

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Date Created
2019-05

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Human Papillomavirus specific immune responses as biomarkers for the early detection of cervical cancer

Description

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of cervical cancer. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV 16, 18 or 45 species is associated with the development and progression of cervical cancer. HPV genotyping and Pap smear tests are the regular methods

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of cervical cancer. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV 16, 18 or 45 species is associated with the development and progression of cervical cancer. HPV genotyping and Pap smear tests are the regular methods used to detect pre-invasive cervical lesions, but there is a need for developing a rapid biomarker to profile immunity to these viruses. The viral E7 oncogene is expressed in most HPV-associated cancers and anti-E7 antibodies can be detected in the blood of patients with cervical cancer. This research was focused on viral E7 oncogene expression to be used in development of low-cost point of care tests, enabling patients from low resource settings to detect the asymptotic stage of cervical cancer and be able to seek treatment early. In order to produce the E7 protein in vitro to measure antibody levels, GST tagged E7 genes from HPV 16, 18 and 45 species were inserted into the pDEST15 vector and expressed in E. coli BL21DE3 cells that were induced with 1mM of IPTG. The E7-GST fused expressed protein was then purified using glutathione beads and resolved on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Protein expression was 5.8 \u03bcg/ml for HPV 16E7 in 500 ml culture and for the 500 ml culture of HPV 18 E7 and 45 E7 were 10.5 \u03bcg/ml and 10.5 \u03bcg/ml for HPV 18E7 and 45E7 respectively. High yield values are showing high expression levels of GST-tagged E7 recombinant protein which can be used for serotyping a number of individuals. This shows that HPV E7 can be produced in large quantities that can potentially be used in point of care tests that can help identify women at risk of cervical cancer. In conclusion, the E7 protein produced in this study can potentially be used to induce humoral responses in patients\u2019 sera for understanding the immune response of cervical cancer.

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Date Created
2018-12

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Autoantibody Signature for the Serologic Detection of Ovarian Cancer

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Sera from patients with ovarian cancer contain autoantibodies (AAb) to tumor-derived proteins that are potential biomarkers for early detection. To detect AAb, we probed high-density programmable protein microarrays (NAPPA) expressing 5177 candidate tumor antigens with sera from patients with serous

Sera from patients with ovarian cancer contain autoantibodies (AAb) to tumor-derived proteins that are potential biomarkers for early detection. To detect AAb, we probed high-density programmable protein microarrays (NAPPA) expressing 5177 candidate tumor antigens with sera from patients with serous ovarian cancer (n = 34 cases/30 controls) and measured bound IgG. Of these, 741 antigens were selected and probed with an independent set of ovarian cancer sera (n = 60 cases/60 controls). Twelve potential autoantigens were identified with sensitivities ranging from 13 to 22% at >93% specificity. These were retested using a Luminex bead array using 60 cases and 60 controls, with sensitivities ranging from 0 to 31.7% at 95% specificity. Three AAb (p53, PTPRA, and PTGFR) had area under the curve (AUC) levels >60% (p < 0.01), with the partial AUC (SPAUC) over 5 times greater than for a nondiscriminating test (p < 0.01). Using a panel of the top three AAb (p53, PTPRA, and PTGFR), if at least two AAb were positive, then the sensitivity was 23.3% at 98.3% specificity. AAb to at least one of these top three antigens were also detected in 7/20 sera (35%) of patients with low CA 125 levels and 0/15 controls. AAb to p53, PTPRA, and PTGFR are potential biomarkers for the early detection of ovarian cancer.

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2015-01-01

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Isolation, Detection, and Quantification of Cancer Biomarkers in HPV-Associated Malignancies

Description

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been recognized as the main etiologic factor in the development of various cancers including penile, vulva, oropharyngeal and cervical cancers. In the development of cancer, persistent HPV infections induce E6 and E7 oncoproteins, which promote

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been recognized as the main etiologic factor in the development of various cancers including penile, vulva, oropharyngeal and cervical cancers. In the development of cancer, persistent HPV infections induce E6 and E7 oncoproteins, which promote cell proliferation and carcinogenesis resulting elevated levels of host antibodies (e.g., anti-HPV16 E7 antibody). Currently, these cancers are clinically diagnosed using invasive biopsy-based tests, which are performed only in centralized labs by experienced clinical staff using time-consuming and expensive tools and technologies. Therefore, these obstacles constrain their utilization at primary care clinics and in remote settings, where resources are limited. Here, we present a rapid, inexpensive, reliable, easy-to-use, customized immunoassay platform following a microfluidic filter device to detect and quantify anti-HPV16 E7 antibodies from whole blood as a non-invasive assisting technology for diagnosis of HPV-associated malignancies, especially, at primary healthcare and remote settings. The platform can detect and quantify anti-HPV16 E7 antibody down to 2.87 ng/mL. We further validated our immunoassay in clinical patient samples and it provided significantly high responses as compared to control samples. Thus, it can be potentially implemented as a pretesting tool to identify high-risk groups for broad monitoring of HPV-associated cancers in resource-constrained settings.

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Date Created
2017-06-12

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Genomic Amplification of 9p24.1 Targeting JAK2, PD-L1, and PD-L2 is Enriched in High-Risk Triple Negative Breast Cancer

Description

We used DNA content flow cytometry followed by oligonucleotide array based comparative genomic hybridization to survey the genomes of 326 tumors, including 41 untreated surgically resected triple negative breast cancers (TNBC). A high level (log2ratio ≥1) 9p24 amplicon was found

We used DNA content flow cytometry followed by oligonucleotide array based comparative genomic hybridization to survey the genomes of 326 tumors, including 41 untreated surgically resected triple negative breast cancers (TNBC). A high level (log2ratio ≥1) 9p24 amplicon was found in TNBC (12/41), glioblastomas (2/44), and colon carcinomas (2/68). The shortest region of overlap for the amplicon targets 9p24.1 and includes the loci for PD-L1, PD-L2, and JAK2 (PDJ amplicon). In contrast this amplicon was absent in ER+ (0/8) and HER2+ (0/15) breast tumors, and in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (0/150). The PDJ amplicon in TNBCs was correlated with clinical outcomes in group comparisons by two-sample t-tests for continuous variables and chi-squared tests for categorical variables. TNBC patients with the PDJ amplicon had a worse outcome with worse disease-free and overall survival. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed that the PDJ amplicon in TNBC is associated with elevated expression of JAK2 and of the PD-1 ligands. These initial findings demonstrate that the PDJ amplicon is enriched in TNBC, targets signaling pathways that activate the PD-1 mediated immune checkpoint, and identifies patients with a poor prognosis.

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Date Created
2015-07-03

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Application of Flat Panel OLED Display Technology for the Point-of-Care Detection of Circulating Cancer Biomarkers

Description

Point-of-care molecular diagnostics can provide efficient and cost-effective medical care, and they have the potential to fundamentally change our approach to global health. However, most existing approaches are not scalable to include multiple biomarkers. As a solution, we have combined

Point-of-care molecular diagnostics can provide efficient and cost-effective medical care, and they have the potential to fundamentally change our approach to global health. However, most existing approaches are not scalable to include multiple biomarkers. As a solution, we have combined commercial flat panel OLED display technology with protein microarray technology to enable high-density fluorescent, programmable, multiplexed biorecognition in a compact and disposable configuration with clinical-level sensitivity. Our approach leverages advances in commercial display technology to reduce pre-functionalized biosensor substrate costs to pennies per cm[superscript 2]. Here, we demonstrate quantitative detection of IgG antibodies to multiple viral antigens in patient serum samples with detection limits for human IgG in the 10 pg/mL range. We also demonstrate multiplexed detection of antibodies to the HPV16 proteins E2, E6, and E7, which are circulating biomarkers for cervical as well as head and neck cancers.

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Date Created
2016-07-04

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Serum Immune Profiling for Early Detection of Cervical Disease

Description

Background: The most recent (2012) worldwide estimates from International Agency for Research on Cancer indicate that approximately 528,000 new cases and 270,000 deaths per year are attributed to cervical cancer worldwide. The disease is preventable with HPV vaccination and with

Background: The most recent (2012) worldwide estimates from International Agency for Research on Cancer indicate that approximately 528,000 new cases and 270,000 deaths per year are attributed to cervical cancer worldwide. The disease is preventable with HPV vaccination and with early detection and treatment of pre-invasive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, CIN. Antibodies (Abs) to HPV proteins are under investigation as potential biomarkers for early detection.

Methods: To detect circulating HPV-specific IgG Abs, we developed programmable protein arrays (NAPPA) that display the proteomes of two low-risk HPV types (HPV6 and 11) and ten oncogenic high-risk HPV types (HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52 and 58). Arrays were probed with sera from women with CIN 0/I (n=78), CIN II/III (n=84), or invasive cervical cancer (ICC, n=83).

Results: Abs to any early (E) HPV protein were detected less frequently in women with CIN 0/I (23.7%) than women with CIN II/III (39.0%) and ICC (46.1%, p<0.04). Of the E Abs, anti-E7 Abs were the most frequently detected (6.6%, 19.5%, and 30.3%, respectively). The least frequently detected Abs were E1 and E2-Abs in CIN 0/I (1.3%) and E1-Abs in CIN II/III (1.2%) and ICC (7.9%). HPV16-specific Abs correlated with HPV16 DNA detected in the cervix in 0% of CIN 0/I, 21.2% of CIN II/III, and 45.5% of ICC. A significant number (29 - 73%) of E4, E7, L1, and L2 Abs had cross-reactivity between HPV types.

Conclusion: HPV protein arrays provide a valuable high-throughput tool for measuring the breadth, specificity, and heterogeneity of the serologic response to HPV in cervical disease.

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Date Created
2017-08-23

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F2-isoprostanes and F2-isoprostane Metabolites: Biomarkers for Oxidative Stress and Therapeutic Efficacy

Description

F2-isoprostanes are a series of prostaglandin-like compounds derived from the free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation of arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is ubiquitously expressed in cell membranes. F2-isoprostanes are biomarkers of oxidative stress, an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants

F2-isoprostanes are a series of prostaglandin-like compounds derived from the free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation of arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is ubiquitously expressed in cell membranes. F2-isoprostanes are biomarkers of oxidative stress, an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants that can cause damage to DNA, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates. Increased production of lipid peroxidation products have been implicated in the pathology of a number of conditions and diseases in humans. The objective of this thesis was to (1) optimize the LC/MS/MS F2-isoprostane method currently used in human samples for use in research animals and veterinary medicine, including the use of solid phase extraction, and (2) validate the optimized method in rodent and canine experimental studies. Our optimized method showed that Lyprinol treatment in dogs with osteoarthritis decreases F2-isoprostane levels nearly 2-fold. In addition, adjuvant alpha-tocopherol prevented tumor-induced increased F2-isoprostane levels. Finally, contrary to earlier studies using less specific ELISA F2-isoprostane methods, we demonstrate that unconditioned dogs benefit from low intensity exercise. Our data demonstrate successful optimization of the human LC/MS/MS F2-isoprostane method in rats and canines. Importantly, our results emphasize the need to use the more sensitive and specific LC/MS/MS method as compared to ELISA-based assays in order to distinguish the 15- and 5-series F2-isoprostanes, evidenced in particular by the two canine studies.

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Date Created
2015-05

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EXPRESSION DETECTION OF HPV-16 mRNA USING RT-qPCR IN HEAD AND NECK CANCER

Description

Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the cause of 99.7% of cervical cancers. Research of cervical cancer has made this disease mostly curable in the developing world. Head and neck cancer, which is increasingly caused by HPV, still is associated with

Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the cause of 99.7% of cervical cancers. Research of cervical cancer has made this disease mostly curable in the developing world. Head and neck cancer, which is increasingly caused by HPV, still is associated with a mortality rate of 50,000 in the US annually. This study proposed to evaluate the biology of HPV-16 in head and neck tumors by using RT-qPCR to measure the RNA expression and its relation to physical status of the virus. Methods: This study was to develop an assay that uses RT-qPCR to determine the quantitative expression of HPV-16 RNA coding for proteins E1, E2, E4, E5, E6, and E7 in tumor samples. The assay development started with creation of primers. It went on to test the primers on template DNA through traditional PCR and then on DNA from HPV-16 positive cell lines, SiHa and CaSki, using RT-qPCR. This paper also describes the troubleshooting methods taken for the PCR reaction. Once the primers are verified, the RT-qPCR process can be carried out on RNA purified from tumor samples. Results: No primer sets have been confirmed to produce a product through PCR or RT-qPCR. The primer sequences match up correctly with known sequences for HPV-16 E1, E2, E4, E5, E6, and E7. RT-qPCR showed results consistent with the hypothesis. Conclusion: The RT-qPCR protocol must be optimized to confirm the primer sequences work as desired. Then primers will be used to study physical status and RNA expression in HPV-positive and HPV-negative head and neck tumor samples. This assay can help shed light on which proteins are expressed most in tumors of the head and neck and will aid in the development of future screening and treatment options.

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Date Created
2015-05

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Expression of the measles virus proteome by RAPID ELISA for serological assays

Description

Background: Measles virus (MV) infections are the main cause of vaccine-preventable death in children younger than 5 years. The World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated there are over 20 million cases of measles every year. Currently, diagnostic methods rely on

Background: Measles virus (MV) infections are the main cause of vaccine-preventable death in children younger than 5 years. The World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated there are over 20 million cases of measles every year. Currently, diagnostic methods rely on enzyme immunoassays (EIA) to detect IgM or IgG Abs in serum. These commercial assays measure reactivity against the immunodominant N antigen and can have a false negative rates of 20-30%. Centralized testing by clinical labs can delay rapid screening in an outbreak setting. This study aims to develop a rapid molecular diagnostic assay to detect IgG reactive to five individual MV proteins representing 85% of the measles proteome. Methods: MV genes were subcloned into pANT_cGST vector to generate C-terminal GST fusion proteins. Single MV cistrons were expressed using in vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) with human cell lysate. Expression of GST-tagged proteins was measured using a sandwich ELISA for GST expression using relative light units (RLUs) as readouts. Single MV antigens were used as bait to determine the IgG-dependent reactivity in 12 serum samples obtained from immunized animals with previously determined neutralization titer (NT) and the correlation between NT and ELISA reactivity was determined. Results: Protein expression of five measles genes of interest, M, N, F, H, and L, was measured. L exhibited the strongest protein expression with an average RLU value of 4.34 x 10^9. All proteins were expressed at least 50% greater than control (2.33 x 10^7 RLU). As expected, reactivity against the N was the highest, followed by reactivity against M, F, H and L. The best correlation with NT titer was reactivity against F (R^2 = 0.62). Conclusion: These data indicate that the expression of single MV genes M, N, F, H, and L are suitable antigens for serologic capture analysis of measles immunity.

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Date Created
2015-05