Matching Items (26)

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Emergency Preparedness in a Zombie World

Description

Young adults do not know basic emergency preparedness skills. Although there are materials out there such as printed and online materials form Center for Disease Control, it is unlikely that

Young adults do not know basic emergency preparedness skills. Although there are materials out there such as printed and online materials form Center for Disease Control, it is unlikely that college-age people will take the time to read them. Some individuals have addressed the issue of young adults not wanting to read materials by creating a fun interactive game in the San Francisco area, but since the game must be played in person, a solution like that can only reach so far. Studies suggest that virtual worlds are effective in teaching people new skills, so I have created a virtual world that will teach people basic emergency preparedness skills in a way that is memorable and appealing to a college-age audience. The logic used to teach players the concepts of emergency preparedness is case-based reasoning. Case-based reasoning is the process of solving new problems by remembering similar solutions in the past. By creating a simulation emergency situation in a virtual world, young adults are more likely to know what to do in the case of an actual emergency.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Post-Mortem of a Tactical Strategy Game

Description

With the increasing popularity of video games and the emergence of game streaming brought about by platforms such as Youtube and Twitch, combined with the multitude of ways to learn

With the increasing popularity of video games and the emergence of game streaming brought about by platforms such as Youtube and Twitch, combined with the multitude of ways to learn how to code from schools and online resources including Codecademy and Treehouse, game development has become incredibly approachable. Yet that does not mean it is simple. Developing a game requires a substantial amount of work, even before a design is considered worth making into a complete game. Over the course of this thesis, I created eight designs with accompanying prototypes. Only one was made into a fully functional release. I sought to make a game with a great design while increasing my understanding of game development and the code needed to finish a game. I came out realizing that I was in over my head. With the amount of work involved in creating an entire game, iteration is key to finding an idea that is capable of becoming a game that feels complete and enjoyable. A game's design must be fleshed out before technical work can truly begin, yet the design can take nearly as much time and effort as the code. In this thesis, each design is detailed and associated with why it seemed great and why it was replaced, with extra focus on the final design and how players felt about it. These designs are followed by what I learned about game development over the course of the thesis, including both the technical and emotional sides of developing a video game.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Keyboard Input Biometric Authentication Spoofing

Description

Keyboard input biometric authentication systems are software systems which record keystroke information and use it to identify a typist. The primary statistics used to determine the accuracy of a keyboard

Keyboard input biometric authentication systems are software systems which record keystroke information and use it to identify a typist. The primary statistics used to determine the accuracy of a keyboard biometric authentication system are the false acceptance rate (FAR) and false rejection rate (FRR), which are aimed to be as low as possible [1]. However, even if a system has a low FAR and FRR, there is nothing stopping an attacker from also monitoring an individual's typing habits in the same way a legitimate authentication system would, and using its knowledge of their habits to recreate virtual keyboard events for typing arbitrary text, with precise timing mimicking those habits, which would theoretically spoof a legitimate keyboard biometric authentication system into thinking it is the intended user doing the typing. A proof of concept of this very attack, called keyboard input biometric authentication spoofing, is the focus of this paper, with the purpose being to show that even if a biometric authentication system is reasonably accurate, with a low FAR and FRR, it can still potentially be very vulnerable to a well-crafted spoofing system. A rudimentary keyboard input biometric authentication system was written in C and C++ which drew influence from already existing methods and attempted new methods of authentication as well. A spoofing system was then built which exploited the authentication system's statistical representation of a user's typing habits to recreate keyboard events as described above. This proof of concept is aimed at raising doubts about the idea of relying too heavily upon keyboard input based biometric authentication systems since the user's typing input can demonstrably be spoofed in this way if an attacker has full access to the system, even if the system itself is accurate. The results are that the authentication system built for this study, when ran on a database of typing event logs recorded from 15 users in 4 sessions, had a 0% FAR and FRR (more detailed analysis of FAR and FRR is also presented), yet it was still very susceptible to being spoofed, with a 44% to 71% spoofing rate in some instances.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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ASU Oculus Fitness Correlation

Description

The purpose of the Oculus Exercise research project we conducted was to find a way to entice individuals to attend a gym more often and for longer periods of time.

The purpose of the Oculus Exercise research project we conducted was to find a way to entice individuals to attend a gym more often and for longer periods of time. We have found that many activities are being augmented by the increasingly popular virtual reality technology, and within that space "gamifying" the activity seems to attract more users. Given the idea of making activities more entertaining to users through "gamification", we decided to incorporate virtual reality, using the Oculus Rift, to immerse users within a simulated environment to potentially drive the factors previously identified in respect to gym utilization. To start, we surveyed potential users to gauge potential interest in virtual reality and its usage in physical exercise. Based on the initial responses, we saw that there was a definite interest in "gamifying" physical exercises using virtual reality, and proceeded to design a prototype using Unreal Engine 4 -- which is an engine for creating high quality video games with support for virtual reality -- to experiment how it would affect a standard workout routine. After considering several options, we decided to move forward with designing our prototype to augment a spin machine with virtual reality due to its common usage within a gym, and the consistent cardiovascular exercise it entails, as well as the safety intrinsic to it being a mostly stationary device. By analyzing the results of a survey after experimenting upon a user test group, we can begin to correlate the benefits and the drawbacks of using virtual reality in physical exercise, and the feasibility of doing so.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Paid to Play: Games as mass communication tools

Description

The 2010s have seen video games rise to prominence as platforms for game developers, entertainers and advertisers to broadcast their ideas. This paper looks at the major steps in gaming

The 2010s have seen video games rise to prominence as platforms for game developers, entertainers and advertisers to broadcast their ideas. This paper looks at the major steps in gaming history that led to games as a global mass communication tool, the way the Internet has created an industry built around broadcasting games and the potential future ramifications competitive gaming, emerging technology and intellectual property law hold on the world of video games.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Predicting Actual Learning in Educational Games

Description

While most of the media attention given to video games focuses on those geared towards the entertainment industry, a less covered topic is the role of serious games. Also known

While most of the media attention given to video games focuses on those geared towards the entertainment industry, a less covered topic is the role of serious games. Also known as “educational” games, serious games are designed with the intent to teach the player a particular skill or topic. These games have gradually been working their way into our educational environments. Children are often taught to type, perform simple math, and correctly spell through a variety of games that have been widely adopted by teachers. However, teaching multiplication is one thing; teaching college-level advanced mathematics is another beast altogether. Can video games actually be used as an educational tool in higher education?
This is a difficult question for a variety of reasons. A major issue to consider is whether the students who play this game are actually learning the material, or simply improving at the game itself. If the game is not designed correctly, one could potentially learn to exploit game mechanics without applying knowledge of the material. While this person’s efficiency at completing the game quickly would suggest mastery of the topic, they may not actually be prepared to take a test on the subject. As such, it is important to thoroughly study the effectiveness of serious games before they are deployed to actual classrooms. This study will do just that with the game Vector Unknown, which was designed to help college students learn linear algebra.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Development of a Game-Based Intervention to Promote HPV Vaccination Among Adolescents: A Qualitative Analysis

Description

Purpose: This qualitative research aimed to create a developmentally and gender-appropriate game-based intervention to promote Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in adolescents. <br/>Background: Ranking as the most common sexually transmitted infection,

Purpose: This qualitative research aimed to create a developmentally and gender-appropriate game-based intervention to promote Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in adolescents. <br/>Background: Ranking as the most common sexually transmitted infection, about 80 million Americans are currently infected by HPV, and it continues to increase with an estimated 14 million new cases yearly. Certain types of HPV have been significantly associated with cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancers in women; penile cancers in men; and oropharyngeal and anal cancers in both men and women. Despite HPV vaccination being one of the most effective methods in preventing HPV-associated cancers, vaccination rates remain suboptimal in adolescents. Game-based intervention, a novel medium that is popular with adolescents, has been shown to be effective in promoting health behaviors. <br/>Methods: Sample/Sampling. We used purposeful sampling to recruit eight adolescent-parent dyads (N = 16) which represented both sexes (4 boys, 4 girls) and different racial/ethnic groups (White, Black, Latino, Asian American) in the United States. The inclusion criteria for the dyads were: (1) a child aged 11-14 years and his/her parent, and (2) ability to speak, read, write, and understand English. Procedure. After eligible families consented to their participation, semi-structured interviews (each 60-90 minutes long) were conducted with each adolescent-parent dyad in a quiet and private room. Each dyad received $50 to acknowledge their time and effort. Measure. The interview questions consisted of two parts: (a) those related to game design, functioning, and feasibility of implementation; (b) those related to theoretical constructs of the Health Belief Model (HBM) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Data analysis. The interviews were audio-recorded with permission and manually transcribed into textual data. Two researchers confirmed the verbatim transcription. We use pre-developed codes to identify each participant’s responses and organize data and develop themes based on the HBM and TPB constructs. After the analysis was completed, three researchers in the team reviewed the results and discussed the discrepancies until a consensus is reached.<br/>Results: The findings suggested that the most common motivating factors for adolescents’ HPV vaccination were its effectiveness, benefits, convenience, affordable cost, reminders via text, and recommendation by a health care provider. Regarding the content included in the HPV game, participants suggested including information about who and when should receive the vaccine, what is HPV and the vaccination, what are the consequences if infected, the side effects of the vaccine, and where to receive the vaccine. The preferred game design elements were: 15 minutes long, stories about fighting or action, option to choose characters/avatars, motivating factors (i.e., rewards such as allowing users to advance levels and receive coins when correctly answering questions), use of a portable electronic device (e.g., tablet) to deliver the education. Participants were open to multiplayer function which assists in a facilitated conversation about HPV and the HPV vaccine. Overall, the participants concluded enthusiasm for an interactive yet engaging game-based intervention to learn about the HPV vaccine with the goal to increase HPV vaccination in adolescents. <br/>Implications: Tailored educational games have the potential to decrease the stigma of HPV and HPV vaccination, increasing communication between the adolescent, parent, and healthcare provider, as well as increase the overall HPV vaccination rate.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

Distant - An Original Game

Description

Distant is a Game Design Document describing an original game by the same name. The game was designed around the principle of core aesthetics, where the user experience is defined

Distant is a Game Design Document describing an original game by the same name. The game was designed around the principle of core aesthetics, where the user experience is defined first and then the game is built from that experience. Distant is an action-exploration game set on a huge megastructure floating in the atmosphere of Saturn. Players take on the role of HUE, an artificial intelligence trapped in the body of a maintenance robot, as he explores this strange world and uncovers its secrets. Using acrobatic movement abilities, players will solve puzzles, evade enemies, and explore the world from top to bottom. The world, known as the Strobilus Megastructure, is conical in shape, with living quarters and environmental system in the upper sections and factories and resource mining in the lower sections. The game world is split up into 10 major areas and countless minor and connecting areas. Special movement abilities like wall running and anti-gravity allow players to progress further down in the world. These abilities also allow players to solve more complicated puzzles, and to find more difficult to reach items. The story revolves around six artificial intelligences that were created to maintain the station. Many centuries ago, these AI helped humankind maintain their day-to-day lives and helped researchers working on new scientific breakthroughs. This led to the discovery of faster-than-light travel, and humanity left the station and our solar system to explore the cosmos. HUE, the AI in charge of human relations, fell into depression and shut down. Awakening several hundred years in the future, HUE sets out to find the other AI. Along the way he helps them reconnect and discovers the history and secrets of the station. Distant is intended for players looking for three things: A fantastic world full of discovery, a rich, character driven narrative, and challenging acrobatic gameplay. Players of any age or background are recommended to give it a try, but it will require investment and a willingness to improve. Distant is intended to change players, to force them to confront difficulty and different perspectives. Most games involve upgrading a character; Distant is a game that upgrades the player.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

Enhancing Student Learning Through Adaptive Sentence Generation

Description

Education of any skill based subject, such as mathematics or language, involves a significant amount of repetition and pratice. According to the National Survey of Student Engagements, students spend on

Education of any skill based subject, such as mathematics or language, involves a significant amount of repetition and pratice. According to the National Survey of Student Engagements, students spend on average 17 hours per week reviewing and practicing material previously learned in a classroom, with higher performing students showing a tendency to spend more time practicing. As such, learning software has emerged in the past several decades focusing on providing a wide range of examples, practice problems, and situations for users to exercise their skills. Notably, math students have benefited from software that procedurally generates a virtually infinite number of practice problems and their corresponding solutions. This allows for instantaneous feedback and automatic generation of tests and quizzes. Of course, this is only possible because software is capable of generating and verifying a virtually endless supply of sample problems across a wide range of topics within mathematics. While English learning software has progressed in a similar manner, it faces a series of hurdles distinctly different from those of mathematics. In particular, there is a wide range of exception cases present in English grammar. Some words have unique spellings for their plural forms, some words have identical spelling for plural forms, and some words are conjugated differently for only one particular tense or person-of-speech. These issues combined make the problem of generating grammatically correct sentences complicated. To compound to this problem, the grammar rules in English are vast, and often depend on the context in which they are used. Verb-tense agreement (e.g. "I eat" vs "he eats"), and conjugation of irregular verbs (e.g. swim -> swam) are common examples. This thesis presents an algorithm designed to randomly generate a virtually infinite number of practice problems for students of English as a second language. This approach differs from other generation approaches by generating based on a context set by educators, so that problems can be generated in the context of what students are currently learning. The algorithm is validated through a study in which over 35 000 sentences generated by the algorithm are verified by multiple grammar checking algorithms, and a subset of the sentences are validated against 3 education standards by a subject matter expert in the field. The study found that this approach has a significantly reduced grammar error ratio compared to other generation algorithms, and shows potential where context specification is concerned.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Exploring the Virtual Reality Threshold with the Oculus Rift

Description

This paper will explore what makes ‘good’ virtual reality, that is, what constitutes the virtual reality threshold. It will explain what this has to do with the temporary death of

This paper will explore what makes ‘good’ virtual reality, that is, what constitutes the virtual reality threshold. It will explain what this has to do with the temporary death of virtual reality, and argue that that threshold has now been crossed and true virtual reality is now possible, as evidenced by the current wave of virtual reality catalyzed by the Oculus Rift. The Rift will be used as a case study for examining specific aspects of the virtual reality threshold.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05