Matching Items (3)

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Assessing Student Motivation as a Function of Pedagogical Agent Gender in Writing-Pal

Description

The influence that agent-student interaction has on learning can have significant outcomes in an ITS. Agent-human relationships within ITSs possess elements modeled by teacher-student relationships in the classroom. As a

The influence that agent-student interaction has on learning can have significant outcomes in an ITS. Agent-human relationships within ITSs possess elements modeled by teacher-student relationships in the classroom. As a result, student perceptions of pedagogical agents can affect learning outcomes. An efficient environment can depend upon the intention for which the virtual agent is designed. As researchers gain more knowledge on the effect that characteristics outside of language have on learning, agent pedagogies can begin to be developed and perfected. In this research, we investigate the role that the pedagogical agent's gender has in the learning process. Specifically, we examine whether gender of agent interacts with gender of student to influence variables related to affect and motivation in ITSs

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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L2 WRITING PRACTICE: GAME ENJOYMENT AS A KEY TO ENGAGEMENT

Description

The Writing Pal (W-Pal) is an intelligent tutoring system (ITS) designed to provide students with explicit writing strategy instruction and practice. W-Pal includes a suite of educational games developed to

The Writing Pal (W-Pal) is an intelligent tutoring system (ITS) designed to provide students with explicit writing strategy instruction and practice. W-Pal includes a suite of educational games developed to increase writing engagement and provide opportunities to practice writing strategies. In this study, first (L1) (n = 26) and second (L2) language (n = 16) students interacted with W-Pal over eight sessions. We collected students’ daily self- reports of engagement, motivation, and perceptions of performance, as well as their reported game attitudes (difficulty, helpfulness for learning, and enjoyment). Results indicated that, for all students, interactions with W-Pal led to increases in writing performance and more positive attitudes towards the system (engagement, motivation, and perceived performance). For L1 students, game difficulty was a significant predictor of boredom; however, for the L2 students, game enjoyment predicted both their motivation and perceived writing improvement. Notably, the L2 students’ game ratings accounted for more variance in these daily reports than did the ratings of L1 students. This study suggests that L1 and L2 students experience similar benefits offered by game-based strategy practice in an ITS. Further, the link between game attitudes and overall daily perceptions of training may be stronger for L2 students than L1 students.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-06-01

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Examining the role of linguistic flexibility in the text production process

Description

A commonly held belief among educators, researchers, and students is that high-quality texts are easier to read than low-quality texts, as they contain more engaging narrative and story-like elements. Interestingly,

A commonly held belief among educators, researchers, and students is that high-quality texts are easier to read than low-quality texts, as they contain more engaging narrative and story-like elements. Interestingly, these assumptions have typically failed to be supported by the writing literature. Research suggests that higher quality writing is typically associated with decreased levels of text narrativity and readability. Although narrative elements may sometimes be associated with high-quality writing, the majority of research suggests that higher quality writing is associated with decreased levels of text narrativity, and measures of readability in general. One potential explanation for this conflicting evidence lies in the situational influence of text elements on writing quality. In other words, it is possible that the frequency of specific linguistic or rhetorical text elements alone is not consistently indicative of essay quality. Rather, these effects may be largely driven by individual differences in students' ability to leverage the benefits of these elements in appropriate contexts. This dissertation presents the hypothesis that writing proficiency is associated with an individual's flexible use of text properties, rather than simply the consistent use of a particular set of properties. Across three experiments, this dissertation relies on a combination of natural language processing and dynamic methodologies to examine the role of linguistic flexibility in the text production process. Overall, the studies included in this dissertation provide important insights into the role of flexibility in writing skill and develop a strong foundation on which to conduct future research and educational interventions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017