Matching Items (65)

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Comparative Nursing Education in the US and UK

Description

I conducted a qualitative, comparative study on the nursing education systems in the United Kingdom and the United States, focusing on two universities—Arizona State University in Phoenix, Arizona and Leeds

I conducted a qualitative, comparative study on the nursing education systems in the United Kingdom and the United States, focusing on two universities—Arizona State University in Phoenix, Arizona and Leeds Beckett University in Leeds, England. The goals of my thesis included comparing the educational, economic, and cultural aspects of the countries and how those aspects impact nursing students on both sides of the pond. The educational and economic aspects were compared by utilizing existing literature and open data sources such as the university websites and publications from comparative education journals, while the cultural differences were evaluated by conducting short, one-on-one interviews with students enrolled in the Adult Health courses at both universities. The findings from the interviews were transcribed and coded, and findings from the sites were compared. While there is an extensive amount of research published regarding comparative education, there has not been much published comparing these developed countries. While there is a significant difference in the structure and cost of the nursing programs, there are more similarities than differences in culture between nursing students interviewed in the US and those interviewed in the UK.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Women's Awareness of Lactation Support Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA)

Description

The purpose of this cross-sectional questionnaire is to explore women’s awareness about the lactation support amendments under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the support they received from their insurance

The purpose of this cross-sectional questionnaire is to explore women’s awareness about the lactation support amendments under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the support they received from their insurance companies and employers based on the act. Using convenience sampling and snowball sampling, participants were recruited to participate in a survey through social media and flyers. The goals of this research are to examine the number of women who were 1) aware of the lactation support provisions under the ACA, 2) received breastfeeding support from insurance their health insurance with no cost sharing 3) received reasonable break time and a private space to express milk from their employers, and 4) if there were any challenges in receiving the support mandated under the ACA from their insurers and employers or lactation support in general. The results show that many women who responded to the survey were aware of the amendments under the ACA and many of those women did receive the benefits of the provisions. There were many common reasons for why women did not receive the support they desired. These underlying reasons prevent women from accessing lactation support and provide a challenging environment for women to continue breastfeeding their children.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Sibling's Response to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer

Description

The purpose of this research project is to explore the healthy sibling’s response to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. A cancer diagnosis is a life altering event that effects

The purpose of this research project is to explore the healthy sibling’s response to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. A cancer diagnosis is a life altering event that effects the ill child, the family, and more specifically sibling(s) if applicable. Over the past decade research on siblings of children with cancer has steadily increased and called for implementing the population into the pediatric oncology plan of care. A systematic literature review containing both qualitative and quantitative data was conducted in order to uncover common themes presented in existing sibling research that influence the sibling experience. A literature search was conducted utilizing EBSCOhost, SAGE journals, and CINAHL. Inclusion criteria used included English, full text, scholarly, peer reviewed, research articles, and systematic reviews, and the search was limited to publications between January 2014 to August 2019. Search results found 196 articles originally. The researcher removed duplicates and scanned the titles narrowing the literature to a total of thirteen articles. The articles included comprised literature reviews, interviews, group intervention studies, a cross-sectional study, and case-controlled design. From this systematic review, common themes that emerged included sibling demographics and characteristics, emotional/behavioral difficulties, a lost sense of self, altered family functioning, the effect of peer, family, and professional support systems, and lack of knowledge and communication. These themes can be interpreted as factors that may influence a sibling’s cancer experience. The results of this research project showed that the sibling’s experience to cancer is complex, multifaceted, and unique. These findings emphasize the need to provide siblings with adequate resources and support in an effort to mitigate the negative effects a diagnosis and treatment of cancer can bring. It is important that the entire healthcare team is competent in this care perspective so that appropriate referrals and interventions can be made, and siblings have the smoothest transition possible.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

Using Technology to Standardize Surgical Site Infection Prevention

Description

Surgical site infections do not need to be a common complication in the healthcare field. They can be avoided through the use of surgical site infection prevention bundles. More specifically,

Surgical site infections do not need to be a common complication in the healthcare field. They can be avoided through the use of surgical site infection prevention bundles. More specifically, the bundles can be personalized to each patient to offer further infection prevention when the patient presents with a higher comorbidity risk. Hospitals could reduce their surgical site infection rates through the use of artificial intelligence combing electronic health records and calculating the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores to ultimately form an automatic operating room checklist. Low-risk patients will have a standard primary checklist of interventions. Higher risk patients have additional secondary and tertiary interventions added to their primary checklists.
Through a combination of literature, expert opinion, and various seminars at the APIC (Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology), I determined an evidence based primary list of SSI prevention strategies that should be standard amongst all patients. I also gained information on interventions that should be included when patients have higher CCI and ASA scores. My presentation will demonstrate the need for standardization of surgical site infection prevention strategies, the ease that would come from using an artificial intelligence robot to derive the exact intervention checklist best suited for the patient and a cost analysis to demonstrate the current spending and potential savings from using such technology.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

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The Impact of Perceived Discrimination on Stress Levels of African American Women Struggling with Excess Weight: A Thematic Literature Review

Description

The minority population of African American women (AAW) have been found to be most at risk when it comes to certain negative health outcomes (Hales, Carroll, Fryar, & Ogden, 2017).

The minority population of African American women (AAW) have been found to be most at risk when it comes to certain negative health outcomes (Hales, Carroll, Fryar, & Ogden, 2017). The purpose of this literature review is to discuss the negative effects of perceived discrimination on stress levels for obese AAW. Analysis of several studies have found that perceived discrimination increases the stress levels of AAW and can lead to an increase in physical health problems such as poor eating behaviors, which can lead to weight gain and chronic health issues such as hypertension, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, cardiovascular disease, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, fatty liver disease, and pregnancy complications (Cooper, Thayer, & Waldstein, 2013; Hales, Carroll, Fryar, & Ogden, 2017; Hayman, McIntyre, & Abbey, 2015; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 2015). Through research, increased stress due to perceived discrimination was also found to have negative impacts on mental health such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, rumination, negative racial regard, and psychological distress (Carter, Walker, Cutrona, Simons, & Beach, 2016; Hill, & Hoggard, 2018; Knox-Kazimierczuk, Geller, Sellers, Baszile, & Smith-Shockley, 2018; Pascoe, & Richman, 2009). Article analysis found that many AAW use negative coping mechanisms such as rumination, negative racial regard, poor eating behaviors, and repressing feels of race-related events to combat stress when dealing with race-based events (Carter, Walker, Cutrona, Simons, & Beach, 2016; Hayman, McIntyre, & Abbey, 2015; Hill, & Hoggard, 2018). Positive coping mechanisms discussed to reduce stress and chronic disease included prayer and active coping to counteract the effects of rumination (Cooper, Thayer, & Waldstein, 2013; Hill, & Hoggard, 2018).

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

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Exploring Chinese College Students’ HPV Awareness, Knowledge, Attitudes, and Intent of HPV Vaccination: A Qualitative Study

Description

This qualitative research paper explores Chinese college students’ awareness, knowledge, attitudes, beliefs of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and factors contributing to their vaccination intent. The researchers conducted four focus groups to

This qualitative research paper explores Chinese college students’ awareness, knowledge, attitudes, beliefs of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and factors contributing to their vaccination intent. The researchers conducted four focus groups to gain a deeper understanding of Chinese college students and their awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of HPV. Focus groups data were analyzed based on the Health Belief Model. Participants discoursed perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness, perceived barriers, perceived benefits, self-efficacy, cues to action, and strategies to promote HPV vaccination in a discussion format. This paper analyzes potential interventions that address individual, societal, political, and cultural conditions which can be used to promote vaccination behaviors among the young Chinese adult population. Participants exhibited limited knowledge about HPV and HPV vaccination, but simultaneously expressed willingness to become vaccinated and encouraged others to become vaccinated as well. Healthcare providers, especially nurses, play a key role in promoting HPV knowledge and vaccination in China. Widespread efforts from varying facets of the healthcare system must be implemented to continue to promote awareness and knowledge of HPV and its vaccinations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

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Music and Memory: Exploring a Music-Based Intervention on Bathing for Residents in Memory Care

Description

Personal hygiene, as well as many other daily living tasks, is not often regarded as a stressful or traumatic event. Giving a bath or shower to a person with Alzheimer’s

Personal hygiene, as well as many other daily living tasks, is not often regarded as a stressful or traumatic event. Giving a bath or shower to a person with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias (ADRD) is typically an ongoing struggle for caregivers around the world. Generally, taking a bath or shower results in hostility, arguing, combativeness, screaming and even crying. This study explores claims that live music decreases levels of stress during bathing for people with ADRD. To test this, qualitative data has been collected based on the observations of professional caregivers, and quantitative data has been collected based on the levels of cortisol, a human stress hormone, taken before and after bath times on music and non-music days. These preliminary results suggest that live music-based interventions may lessen the trauma experienced by the residents during bath times. Therefore, this study opens the door for more consistent use of music by nurses, nursing aids, and other caregivers to perform better care for people with memory-loss complications.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

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An Examination of Chronic Pain and Opioid Use Among Veterans with and without Alcohol Use Disorder

Description

Chronic pain is devastating and highly prevalent among Veterans in the United States (Johnson, Levesque, Broderick, Bailey & Kerns, 2017). While there are various treatment options for chronic pain, opioids

Chronic pain is devastating and highly prevalent among Veterans in the United States (Johnson, Levesque, Broderick, Bailey & Kerns, 2017). While there are various treatment options for chronic pain, opioids remain high in popularity. Although opioids are fast-acting and effective, potential consequences range from unpleasant side effects to dependence and fatal overdose (Baldini, Korff & Lin, 2012; Park et al., 2015; Kaur, 2007). The effects of opioid treatment can be further complicated by a history of alcohol abuse. Past alcohol abuse is a risk factor for opioid misuse (McCabe et al., 2008). One alternative to opioid medication is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain (CBT-CP). CBT-CP has shown small to moderate effects on chronic pain after the end of treatment (Naylor, Keefe, Brigidi, Naud & Helzer, 2008). The current study examined the effect of CBT-CP on opioid prescriptions, as well as the role of past alcohol abuse in CBT-CP efficacy, through an archival data analysis of Veterans Affairs patient charts. In order to determine the effect of CBT-CP on opioid prescriptions, an opioid change score was calculated from treatment start date to twelve months post-treatment. An analysis of 106 patient charts demonstrated no statistically significant difference in opioid prescriptions between Veterans who were referred and attended treatment (n = 24) and those who were referred but did not attend (n = 82). Veterans from both groups showed a reduction in prescribed opioids during a 12-month period. Furthermore, there was no statistically significant difference between Veterans with versus without a history of alcohol abuse in terms of the change in opioid prescriptions over a 12-month period (both groups showed reductions). This research suggests that opioid prescriptions may decrease over time among Veterans referred for CBT-CP, even among those who do not participate in the groups. More work is needed to understand the relationship between opioid prescriptions and actual opioid use over time among Veterans who do and do not choose to participate in CBT-CP. Continuing to address poly-substance use in chronic pain patients also is critical to ensure that Veterans suffering from chronic pain receive appropriate intervention.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Expression of the Fusogenic Protein Syncytin in Macrophages

Description

Cell fusion is a process that occurs in normal cells as well as in pathological cells. This process does not occur spontaneously, fusogens are required to mediate the process. Syncytin

Cell fusion is a process that occurs in normal cells as well as in pathological cells. This process does not occur spontaneously, fusogens are required to mediate the process. Syncytin is one of the proteins that was determined to have fusogenic properties. Syncytin is a newly discovered transmembrane protein that is generally expressed in mammalian placenta and it is known for its role in cell fusion during placentation. The recent studies in Ugarova’s laboratory suggest syncytin is expressed in macrophages, thus it may be involved in macrophage cells fusion. This paper provides a literature review of syncytin protein; it also contains an experimental study conducted to determine syncytin expression on both RNA and protein level. The study was conducted on RNA and protein isolated from macrophages isolated from mouse peritoneum. Agarose gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis were used to determine syncytin expression on RNA and protein level respectively. Using these methods, syncytin expression was determined at different time points during macrophage fusion. The results show that syncytin is not expressed in freshly isolated macrophages, but its expression is initiated during macrophage adhesion in the presence of IL-4.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Analyzing Hospital Environments Provided By Nurses: A Qualitative Study

Description

The purpose of this study is to explore ways nurses provide an optimal healing environment in the hospital setting. One aim of this research is to identify gaps between nurses’

The purpose of this study is to explore ways nurses provide an optimal healing environment in the hospital setting. One aim of this research is to identify gaps between nurses’ confidence in their ability to provide a healing environment and patient interpretation of the environment they received. Additionally, this paper looks for missing information in healing environment literature and pinpoints where hospital systems can be improved to help nurses and patients under their care. Data was collected through two online surveys created with Qualtrics Research Core™. One was taken by registered nurses who annotated how well they execute each domain of an Optimal Healing Environment (OHE) and what hinders their performance. The other survey was given to individuals who have been a patient in an Arizona hospital, and they commented on the environment they experienced. Total surveyed subjects include three nurses and four previously hospitalized patients. Data collected was not enough to make any conclusions so additional literature was reviewed and patterns between the literature and survey responses were analyzed. There is a consensus around what a healing environment should look like but there is no explanation as to who is responsible for creating one and what is the nurse’s role, if any. It was concluded that there needs to be more research on the practice of providing healing environments.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05