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Religion and College Romance: A Qualitative Approach to Interfaith Dating

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The prevalence of interfaith marriages and relationships is increasing now more than ever, especially among university students. Interfaith marriages have been examined across cultures with a focus on quantitative data. Most of this information is related to interfaith marriages, but

The prevalence of interfaith marriages and relationships is increasing now more than ever, especially among university students. Interfaith marriages have been examined across cultures with a focus on quantitative data. Most of this information is related to interfaith marriages, but not much has been said about interfaith dating. The focus of this study is to examine people's accounts of their relationships in order to learn more about the nature of interfaith relationships, specifically in students. What is being in an interfaith relationship like? A qualitative approach using four couples (N=8) in a two-year or four-year university program was used to gain more insight into the religious aspect of relationships. Conducting interviews of the couples together and separately allowed the individuals to comment on marriage, weddings, family, children, and more with regards to how religion has played a role. By interviewing the couples themselves, insight is gained on their personal relationships with each other. The interactions these couples have together, as well as their responses during interviewing, have both lead to findings regarding what being engaged in an interfaith relationship is like. Each couple is different and has their own, unique story to share. This thesis examines (1) an overview of the couples, (2) what does religion mean to the members of each couple, (3) what does a relationship mean to the members of each couple, (4) marriage, (5) religion as a couple, (6) limitations, and (7) recommendations for future research. This thesis aims to use personal experiences in order to learn more about the nature of interfaith relationships.

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2018-05

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A Comprehensive Literature Review of Intimate Partner Violence in the LGBT+ Community and Mandatory Arrest Laws

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From physical assault to intimidation, domestic/intimate partner violence (DV/IPV) is a phenomenon that plagues partners around the world. With serious ramifications like depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and homicide, among others, DV/IPV poses a threat to the health and well-being of

From physical assault to intimidation, domestic/intimate partner violence (DV/IPV) is a phenomenon that plagues partners around the world. With serious ramifications like depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and homicide, among others, DV/IPV poses a threat to the health and well-being of individuals engaged in abusive relationships. It is for this reason that second wave feminists made it a part of their agenda fight for legislation that would protect battered women. Encouraged by the second wave feminists, researchers began studying DV/IPV and the most effective ways to address and combat violent relationships. With the help of research, activism, and landmark court cases, many states have decided upon mandatory arrest laws as the preferred method for handling situations of DV/IPV. While there is a great deal of research that has been conducted on DV/IPV and on mandatory arrest laws, this research seldom extends to DV/IPV in the LGBT+ community. Even more concerning, research on how mandatory arrest laws affect LGBT+ individuals locked in abusive relationships is practically non-existent. Using 25 different sources, I have conducted a literature review that examines the existing literature surrounding mandatory arrest laws, DV/IPV, and DV/IPV in the LGBT+ community. I furthermore utilized the theory of intersectionality, to lay out how DV/IPV in the LGBT+ community differs from DV/IPV among heterosexual couples. This literature review details the history of DV/IPV legislation, identifies the social and structural barriers facing LGBT+ individuals experiencing DV/IPV, and lays out ways that researchers, law enforcement, advocates, and political actors can better equip themselves to help LGBT+ victims of DV/IPV.

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2018-05

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Understanding Sexual Assault Prevention and Management: Public Universities and ROTC

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This thesis examines a convergence point between civil society and the military: the Reserve Officer's Training Corps (ROTC). Specifically, it is centered on how sexual assault is managed within ROTC, a hybrid entity of both the university and the military,

This thesis examines a convergence point between civil society and the military: the Reserve Officer's Training Corps (ROTC). Specifically, it is centered on how sexual assault is managed within ROTC, a hybrid entity of both the university and the military, two institutional arenas where sexual assault has emerged recently as a social problem. The U.S. military and public universities have distinct laws and legal processes as well as institutional cultural influences that address sexual assault. Therefore, I will explore how the hybrid ROTC program governs sexual assault while being simultaneously beholden to similar and/or possibly competing norms of the military and public university. Drawing on multidisciplinary research literature, this exploratory study of the management of sexual assault in a ROTC program in a large public university will be completed using several research methods, including: 1) observation of ROTC sexual assault education programs currently in place and being administered; 2) interviews with ROTC cadets; 3) surveys of ROTC cadets on perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs related to sexual assault and prevention efforts; and 4) analysis of Congressional, Department of Defense, ROTC, and university documents such as legislation, code, sexual assault policies and procedures, education materials, and reports. The study seeks to identify what policies, procedures and laws are in place at the university and in the ROTC program to address sexual assault and harassment, and to measure cadet's understandings and perceptions of such policies, procedures and laws.

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2018-12

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Medicalizing the Female Body: Deconstructing How the United States Uses Hysterectomies as a Method of Perpetrating Pronatalist and White Supremacist Ideology

Description

This thesis will examine the implications behind a higher than average hysterectomy rate in the United States, particularly for women of color and women with lower incomes. It also examines barriers placed on persons trying to obtain a hysterectomy, such

This thesis will examine the implications behind a higher than average hysterectomy rate in the United States, particularly for women of color and women with lower incomes. It also examines barriers placed on persons trying to obtain a hysterectomy, such as those who are younger and therefore, considered be within the "ideal" demographic for reproduction. This is viewed through both a Critical Race Theory and Reproductive Justice framework. The goal of this research is to determine possible reasons behind disparities in hysterectomy demographics and evaluate how these reasons are influenced by the ideologies of white supremacy, pronatalism, population control, and the medicalization of female bodies integrated into the United States medical system. Understanding the reasons behind these disparities is the first step in deconstructing embedded racism and eliminating unconscious healthcare provider bias in order to provide true equitable care. Exploring the historical context of these embedded values is also essential to understand how they are placed into effect today. This thesis takes into account and evaluates both statistical and phenomenological data in order to understand the full scope of the lived impact. It also provides possible solutions and methods for combating the issues outlined for patients, healthcare professionals and healthcare institutions as well as suggestions on how to take this research further.

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2018-12

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Relationship Violence Education for Arizona State University Students

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This toolkit and paper were created as a thesis project for Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University (ASU). When creating this Toolkit, extensive research on existing relationship violence education programs was conducted. Existing data was also analyzed to

This toolkit and paper were created as a thesis project for Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University (ASU). When creating this Toolkit, extensive research on existing relationship violence education programs was conducted. Existing data was also analyzed to assess the prevalence and demography of relationship violence. In conclusion, Relationship Violence Intervention toolkit was created to educate students on how to identify unhealthy behaviors in any relationship.

Relationship Violence Intervention was funded primarily through Barrett, the Honors College, as a thesis and creative project. In addition, the project was awarded a grant through the Sexual Violence Prevention program at Arizona State University.

The authors of this thesis project are qualified to address these topics because of their extensive involvement in relationship and sexual violence. Both authors worked to implement a student organization, Team One Love at ASU, into the ASU community. Through this student organization, the authors were able to spend three years educating Arizona State University students about “red flags” in relationship behaviors through a guided-facilitation format. In addition, the authors collaborated with the Sexual Violence Prevention Education program at Arizona State University to put on large scale events for Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

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2019-05

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Changing Conceptions of the Israel-Palestine Situation: An Analysis of the Effects of Study Abroad

Description

An ever increasing number of university students partake in study abroad opportunities. Extant research has measured the effects of such experiences on the students who participate in them. Nonetheless, this research tends to rely on comparative analyses between study abroad

An ever increasing number of university students partake in study abroad opportunities. Extant research has measured the effects of such experiences on the students who participate in them. Nonetheless, this research tends to rely on comparative analyses between study abroad participants and control groups of students who do not travel abroad. Furthermore, data are often retrospectively collected and are thus subject to individual retention, which may entail significant limitations. This research attempts to subvert these limitations by using a pre- and post-test methodology coupled with qualitative analysis. The study consists of in-depth qualitative interviews with nineteen participants who partook in a semester abroad at the Rothberg International School at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In contrast to previous research which has attempted to ascertain general effects, the aim of this research is to measure the effects of study abroad on individuals’ conceptions and perspectives as they relate to the Israel-Palestine situation and the groups involved. The results indicate that the participant group which consisted of both Jewish and non-Jewish individuals did, in fact, demonstrate changes in their perceptions and perspectives at the conclusion of their study abroad experience. Specifically, the majority of individuals reported more critical views of the Israeli state and its governmental policies in addition to demonstrated increases in empathetic sentiment towards Palestinian individuals. The results are discussed in relation to future research which perhaps could be utilized to further promote perception change and subversion of dominant narratives by fostering intergroup openness and interaction.

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2019-05

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Dissecting the Divide: Words from America's Rural Youth

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This thesis project serves as a case-study on the rural-urban divide, focusing on how young, rural Americans perceive their role in the rural-urban divide, and how their own identity, political association, and voting behavior affects their own perception of the

This thesis project serves as a case-study on the rural-urban divide, focusing on how young, rural Americans perceive their role in the rural-urban divide, and how their own identity, political association, and voting behavior affects their own perception of the divide and political issues at large. In order to explore these American divides, I conducted a case-study of one rural Arizonan town, speaking to participants between the ages of 18-24. Through these interviews, many themes emerged, revealing the complex nature of rurality in light of the 2016 Election. While this research case study does not intend to present a comprehensive view of all rural feelings and beliefs, it intends to explore themes present in how young rural Americans view small-town life, the rural-urban divide, how beliefs are created and supported, and their own ability to change. Though further research and discussion is needed in order to better understand how our nation became divided, these are the voices at the heart of the division. In conclusion, this case study reveals that for everything the nation assumes to be true about the rural-urban divide, there are just as many contradictions and nuances that make The United States a country much broader than just rural or urban.

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2018-05

ERA in AZ

Description

This short documentary on the Equal Rights Amendment features attorney Dianne Post and State Representative Jennifer Jermaine, and it examines the fight for passage at the federal and state level. This film attempts to answer the following questions: What is

This short documentary on the Equal Rights Amendment features attorney Dianne Post and State Representative Jennifer Jermaine, and it examines the fight for passage at the federal and state level. This film attempts to answer the following questions: What is the ERA? What is its history? Why do we need it? How do we get it into the Constitution of the United States of America?

The text of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) states that “equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.” The amendment was authored by Alice Paul and was first introduced into Congress in 1923. The ERA did not make much progress until 1970, when Representative Martha Griffiths from Michigan filed a discharge petition demanding that the ERA move out of the judiciary committee to be heard by the full United States House of Representatives. The House passed it and it went on to the Senate, where it was approved and sent to the states for ratification. By 1977, 35 states had voted to ratify the ERA, but it did not reach the 38 states-threshold required for ratification before the 1982 deadline set by Congress. More recently, Nevada ratified the ERA in March 2017, and Illinois followed suit in May 2018. On January 27th, 2020, Virginia finalized its ratification, making it the 38th state to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment.

Supporters of the ERA argue that we have reached the required goal of approval by 38 states. However, opponents may have at least two legal arguments to challenge this claim by ERA advocates. First, the deadline to ratify was 1982. Second, five states have voted to rescind their ratification since their initial approval. These political and legal challenges must be addressed and resolved before the ERA can be considered part of the United States Constitution. Nevertheless, ERA advocates continue to pursue certification. There are complicated questions to untangle here, to be sure, but by listening to a variety of perspectives and critically examining the historical and legal context, it may be possible to find some answers. Indeed, Arizona, which has yet to ratify the ERA, could play a vital role in the on-going fight for the ERA.

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2020-05

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Prenatal Care, Immigration and the Welfare State: A Comparative of the Hispaniola and US-Mexico Dynamics

Description

This thesis examines the problems that occur when the politics and practices of social services, specifically maternal and prenatal care, are guided by a distorted understanding of immigration. It compares the politics and practice of this care across two international

This thesis examines the problems that occur when the politics and practices of social services, specifically maternal and prenatal care, are guided by a distorted understanding of immigration. It compares the politics and practice of this care across two international borders: the U.S.-Mexico and that within Hispaniola. In an ideal world, care would be extended to all individuals regardless of citizenship. However, since every welfare state has its limits at the national border, citizenship matters to both federal governments and medical professionals. Government-provided resources play an integral role in the current immigration debate, as these programs are a collective investment in which all individuals contribute in order to sustain it. The United States developed the welfare state in order to provide necessary resources to those who could not afford it. Its creators did not view these services as a handout, rather as a support for the future workforce of the country. However, health care was and still is not provided on this model of economic and social citizenship. Current U.S. healthcare policy dictates that no one can be turned away in an emergency situation because someone cannot pay their medical bill, including undocumented immigrants. But for immigrant mothers carrying children across the border, maternal and prenatal care does not qualify as an emergency and the federal government aid typically does not extend to them them as citizens. When care is extended to undocumented immigrants in the United States at all, it typically is provided to the child through Medicaid, who is by dint of the Fourteenth Amendment considered a citizen after birth. The relation between the Dominican Republic and Haiti offers a more complex situation, as the idea of birthright citizenship has recently been revoked. Following the Haitian Earthquake in 2010, the only healthcare to which many Haitians had access was across the Hispaniola border. Haitian women who give birth to children in the Dominican Republic are often not evaluated by a doctor until they are entering the delivery process, and even then health-care is complicated by or denied because of racial prejudice and unclear legal situation. In September of 2013, the Constitutional Court of the Dominican Republic issues a new ruling which declared that any immigrant born between 1929 and 2010 without documentation of their own or of their ancestors does not have citizenship, rendering many Haitians born in the Dominican Republic essentially stateless. To be born to a non-citizen mother typically means the child will likely be born with little or no prenatal care, and the mother will receive poor or inadequate care. Prenatal care is one of the most inexpensive elements of a care-model that carries huge returns relative to its costs. All governments would benefit from improved access to maternal and prenatal care because its future citizens who receive such care would be born healthier and have fewer expensive chronic illnesses. Fewer chronic illness among a population would have huge returns on the welfare state because fewer people would be utilizing it for expensive medical treatments. Though most medical professionals condemn the extreme act of denying care to pregnant women or infants (documented or not), the Dominican Republic and the United States have a popular politics that embraces this cruelty, despite the fact that both pride themselves on a multi-ethnic population. It is easy for policymakers to incriminate undocumented immigrants and claim that they are responsible for an illegitimate share of the consumption of the country's resources. Therefore, it seems likely that the host country's perceptions of immigrant natality and maternity help construct a negative image of the immigration "problem" in such a way that laws and policies are designed without accurate rationale. This thesis examines how the United States and the Dominican Republic might improve the relationship between the culture of healthcare and the role of the legal system for immigrants and their children. It seeks to understand the reasons, motivations, and consequences for denying immigrants services on the account of their citizenship status. The social, economic, and health consequences of being an undocumented citizen will be examined. Current legal policy and what political roadblocks and cultural prejudices must be overcome in order to implement a successful policy will be reviewed. Finally, the best practices prenatal care as a national investment will be discussed, as will the problem of cross-cultural perception of natality, maternity, and immigration.

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2016-05

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"I Wasn't the Mother I Should Have Been": Motherhood, Fatherhood, and Substance Abuse in the Context of Intimate Partner Violence

Description

Mothers have a unique experience of domestic violence and help-seeking because of their dual identity as mothers and survivors. Based on a qualitative analysis of 7 interviews I conducted with mothers in shelter, I explore how survivors understand themselves as

Mothers have a unique experience of domestic violence and help-seeking because of their dual identity as mothers and survivors. Based on a qualitative analysis of 7 interviews I conducted with mothers in shelter, I explore how survivors understand themselves as mothers, their partners as fathers, and the role of substance abuse in their relationships. My research suggests improved policies for service providers, including allowing mothers to maintain custody of their kids while in rehab.

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2014-05