Matching Items (21)

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Creating Culture: An Exploration of Sexual Health and Wellness within Greek Organizations at ASU

Description

Sexual assault is a very serious social issue, one that has recently had a resurgence of interest within the context of college campuses. Studies have shown that the prevalence rates

Sexual assault is a very serious social issue, one that has recently had a resurgence of interest within the context of college campuses. Studies have shown that the prevalence rates of woman abuse in university and college dating are alarmingly high. Historically, fraternity and sorority members have had a reputation for maintaining what has become known as "rape culture" by creating environments in which underage, binge or competitive drinking and unhealthy interactions and inequality between men and women are the norm. Research suggests this combination contributes to the number of known-assailant sexual assaults on or associated with campus life. The main objective of this project is to identify effective ways to foster an anti-sexual violence and pro-sexual wellness culture within ASU's Greek community by observing and analyzing student interactions with and opinions on these issues. This study aims to examine the attitudes of university students toward sexual assault, to learn how students navigate a culture in which sexual assault exists (the ways they respond to, seek to prevent, and learn about sexual assault). Additionally, this study examines student awareness, accessibility, effectiveness, and reach of current sexual violence prevention initiatives on ASU's campus. After conducting interviews with Greek students and performing direct observation during sexual wellness related events, the researchers of this project have determined that ASU has created an environment in which the student population is sufficiently aware of the sexual assault on campus and definitions of campus, but they are not familiar with nor do they often utilize or suggest that their friends utilize the many resources ASU and the Tempe community provide related to sexual health. Students tend to feel that sexual health programming is informative, but not personally relevant to or engaging to them. Feedback would suggest that the bystander intervention curriculum currently being developed in the ASU Fraternity and Sorority Life office would better address student need for relevant, engaging, and culturally-targeted sexual-health programming.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Understanding Sexual Assault Prevention and Management: Public Universities and ROTC

Description

This thesis examines a convergence point between civil society and the military: the Reserve Officer's Training Corps (ROTC). Specifically, it is centered on how sexual assault is managed within ROTC,

This thesis examines a convergence point between civil society and the military: the Reserve Officer's Training Corps (ROTC). Specifically, it is centered on how sexual assault is managed within ROTC, a hybrid entity of both the university and the military, two institutional arenas where sexual assault has emerged recently as a social problem. The U.S. military and public universities have distinct laws and legal processes as well as institutional cultural influences that address sexual assault. Therefore, I will explore how the hybrid ROTC program governs sexual assault while being simultaneously beholden to similar and/or possibly competing norms of the military and public university. Drawing on multidisciplinary research literature, this exploratory study of the management of sexual assault in a ROTC program in a large public university will be completed using several research methods, including: 1) observation of ROTC sexual assault education programs currently in place and being administered; 2) interviews with ROTC cadets; 3) surveys of ROTC cadets on perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs related to sexual assault and prevention efforts; and 4) analysis of Congressional, Department of Defense, ROTC, and university documents such as legislation, code, sexual assault policies and procedures, education materials, and reports. The study seeks to identify what policies, procedures and laws are in place at the university and in the ROTC program to address sexual assault and harassment, and to measure cadet's understandings and perceptions of such policies, procedures and laws.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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Changing Conceptions of the Israel-Palestine Situation: An Analysis of the Effects of Study Abroad

Description

An ever increasing number of university students partake in study abroad opportunities. Extant research has measured the effects of such experiences on the students who participate in them. Nonetheless, this

An ever increasing number of university students partake in study abroad opportunities. Extant research has measured the effects of such experiences on the students who participate in them. Nonetheless, this research tends to rely on comparative analyses between study abroad participants and control groups of students who do not travel abroad. Furthermore, data are often retrospectively collected and are thus subject to individual retention, which may entail significant limitations. This research attempts to subvert these limitations by using a pre- and post-test methodology coupled with qualitative analysis. The study consists of in-depth qualitative interviews with nineteen participants who partook in a semester abroad at the Rothberg International School at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In contrast to previous research which has attempted to ascertain general effects, the aim of this research is to measure the effects of study abroad on individuals’ conceptions and perspectives as they relate to the Israel-Palestine situation and the groups involved. The results indicate that the participant group which consisted of both Jewish and non-Jewish individuals did, in fact, demonstrate changes in their perceptions and perspectives at the conclusion of their study abroad experience. Specifically, the majority of individuals reported more critical views of the Israeli state and its governmental policies in addition to demonstrated increases in empathetic sentiment towards Palestinian individuals. The results are discussed in relation to future research which perhaps could be utilized to further promote perception change and subversion of dominant narratives by fostering intergroup openness and interaction.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Religion and College Romance: A Qualitative Approach to Interfaith Dating

Description

The prevalence of interfaith marriages and relationships is increasing now more than ever, especially among university students. Interfaith marriages have been examined across cultures with a focus on quantitative data.

The prevalence of interfaith marriages and relationships is increasing now more than ever, especially among university students. Interfaith marriages have been examined across cultures with a focus on quantitative data. Most of this information is related to interfaith marriages, but not much has been said about interfaith dating. The focus of this study is to examine people's accounts of their relationships in order to learn more about the nature of interfaith relationships, specifically in students. What is being in an interfaith relationship like? A qualitative approach using four couples (N=8) in a two-year or four-year university program was used to gain more insight into the religious aspect of relationships. Conducting interviews of the couples together and separately allowed the individuals to comment on marriage, weddings, family, children, and more with regards to how religion has played a role. By interviewing the couples themselves, insight is gained on their personal relationships with each other. The interactions these couples have together, as well as their responses during interviewing, have both lead to findings regarding what being engaged in an interfaith relationship is like. Each couple is different and has their own, unique story to share. This thesis examines (1) an overview of the couples, (2) what does religion mean to the members of each couple, (3) what does a relationship mean to the members of each couple, (4) marriage, (5) religion as a couple, (6) limitations, and (7) recommendations for future research. This thesis aims to use personal experiences in order to learn more about the nature of interfaith relationships.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Dissecting the Divide: Words from America's Rural Youth

Description

This thesis project serves as a case-study on the rural-urban divide, focusing on how young, rural Americans perceive their role in the rural-urban divide, and how their own identity, political

This thesis project serves as a case-study on the rural-urban divide, focusing on how young, rural Americans perceive their role in the rural-urban divide, and how their own identity, political association, and voting behavior affects their own perception of the divide and political issues at large. In order to explore these American divides, I conducted a case-study of one rural Arizonan town, speaking to participants between the ages of 18-24. Through these interviews, many themes emerged, revealing the complex nature of rurality in light of the 2016 Election. While this research case study does not intend to present a comprehensive view of all rural feelings and beliefs, it intends to explore themes present in how young rural Americans view small-town life, the rural-urban divide, how beliefs are created and supported, and their own ability to change. Though further research and discussion is needed in order to better understand how our nation became divided, these are the voices at the heart of the division. In conclusion, this case study reveals that for everything the nation assumes to be true about the rural-urban divide, there are just as many contradictions and nuances that make The United States a country much broader than just rural or urban.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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MEN’S PERSPECTIVES ON MASCULINITY

Description

Western culture in the United States socializes men into traditional (hegemonic, toxic) masculinity (Connell & Messerschmidt, 2005). Traditional masculinity remains largely unquestioned as “it’s just the way things are” (Best,

Western culture in the United States socializes men into traditional (hegemonic, toxic) masculinity (Connell & Messerschmidt, 2005). Traditional masculinity remains largely unquestioned as “it’s just the way things are” (Best, 2001; Howes, 2017), unchallenged (Beauvoir, 1953; Migliaccio, 2009), and unreplaced. I conceptualize a novel solution to replace traditional masculinity by promoting visionary masculinity within visionary spaces. I then analyze two spaces by which men are attempting to question and replace traditional masculinity against my two concepts (visionary masculinity and visionary spaces). Lastly, I discuss how traditional masculinity impacts both male offenders and male victims of Domestic Violence.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

ERA in AZ

Description

This short documentary on the Equal Rights Amendment features attorney Dianne Post and State Representative Jennifer Jermaine, and it examines the fight for passage at the federal and state level.

This short documentary on the Equal Rights Amendment features attorney Dianne Post and State Representative Jennifer Jermaine, and it examines the fight for passage at the federal and state level. This film attempts to answer the following questions: What is the ERA? What is its history? Why do we need it? How do we get it into the Constitution of the United States of America?

The text of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) states that “equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.” The amendment was authored by Alice Paul and was first introduced into Congress in 1923. The ERA did not make much progress until 1970, when Representative Martha Griffiths from Michigan filed a discharge petition demanding that the ERA move out of the judiciary committee to be heard by the full United States House of Representatives. The House passed it and it went on to the Senate, where it was approved and sent to the states for ratification. By 1977, 35 states had voted to ratify the ERA, but it did not reach the 38 states-threshold required for ratification before the 1982 deadline set by Congress. More recently, Nevada ratified the ERA in March 2017, and Illinois followed suit in May 2018. On January 27th, 2020, Virginia finalized its ratification, making it the 38th state to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment.

Supporters of the ERA argue that we have reached the required goal of approval by 38 states. However, opponents may have at least two legal arguments to challenge this claim by ERA advocates. First, the deadline to ratify was 1982. Second, five states have voted to rescind their ratification since their initial approval. These political and legal challenges must be addressed and resolved before the ERA can be considered part of the United States Constitution. Nevertheless, ERA advocates continue to pursue certification. There are complicated questions to untangle here, to be sure, but by listening to a variety of perspectives and critically examining the historical and legal context, it may be possible to find some answers. Indeed, Arizona, which has yet to ratify the ERA, could play a vital role in the on-going fight for the ERA.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Stories from immigrant workers in the Valley of the Sun: status, wage theft, recourse, and resilience

Description

Wage theft is a national epidemic that only recently became the focus of increasing research, critical public questioning, and activism. Given the socio- political climate in Maricopa County, Arizona and

Wage theft is a national epidemic that only recently became the focus of increasing research, critical public questioning, and activism. Given the socio- political climate in Maricopa County, Arizona and the heightened national attention on the state, this study answers important questions about the work experiences of immigrant workers in the region. Through an analysis of interviews with 14 low-wage Mexican workers from a local worker rights center, I explore workers' access to traditional recourse, the effects of wage theft on workers and families, and the survival strategies they utilize to mitigate the effects of sudden income loss. By providing an historical overview of immigration and employment law, I show how a dehumanized and racialized labor force has been structurally maintained and exploited. Furthermore, I describe the implications of two simultaneous cultures on the state of labor: the culture of fear among immigrants to assert their rights and utilize recourse, and the culture of criminality and impunity among employers who face virtually no sanctions when they are non-compliant with labor law. The results indicate that unless the rights of immigrant workers are equally enforced and recourse is made equally accessible, not only will the standards for pay and working conditions continue to collapse, but the health of Latino communities will also deteriorate. I assert that in addition to structural change, a shift in national public discourse and ideology is critical to substantive socio-political transformation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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'I ain't nobodies' ho': discourse, stigma, and identity construction in the sex work community

Description

This study is based on 31 interviews conducted in 2012 with male, female, and transgender sex workers at the St. James Infirmary, a full-spectrum health clinic run by sex workers

This study is based on 31 interviews conducted in 2012 with male, female, and transgender sex workers at the St. James Infirmary, a full-spectrum health clinic run by sex workers for sex workers, located in San Francisco, California. My primary goals were, first, to document the lived realities of a diverse range of sex workers who live and work in the San Francisco Bay Area, and, second, to understand the impact of sex work discourse on the facilitation of stigma toward the sex work community and, finally, how that stigma influences the sex worker group identity and individual identity constructions. My primary findings indicate that although sex work discourse has traditionally been constructed within the dominant public sphere and not by sex workers themselves, this discourse has a profound effect on creating and perpetuating the stigma associated with sex work. In turn, this stigma affects both how the group and how individuals construct their identities, often negatively. Alternatively, a benefit of stigma is that it can induce the production of counterpublics which facilitate the emergence of new discourse. However, for this new discourse to gain acceptance into the public sphere, activist organizations must utilize traditional (and sometimes unintentionally marginalizing) strategies that can impact both the identity construction of the group and of individuals within the group. Understanding these complex relationships is therefore essential to understanding how activist organizations, such as the St. James Infirmary, situate themselves within the larger dominant public sphere, their impact on sex work discourse, and their impact on individual sex worker identity construction.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Exploring Intersections of Identity and Service Provision Among LGBTQ Young Adults: A Participatory Action Research Approach

Description

This study explores the ways in which LGBTQ young adults describe the aspects of their identities, and how those identities shape their service needs and experiences. A participatory action research

This study explores the ways in which LGBTQ young adults describe the aspects of their identities, and how those identities shape their service needs and experiences. A participatory action research component was explored as a research and service approach that is sensitive to LGBTQ young people living at the intersections of multiple identities. Although it is understood that LGBTQ young people come from a variety of backgrounds, research is limited in its understanding and exploration of how aspects of identity, such as race and class, influence the lives and service needs of this population. The data was collected through an initial set of interviews with fifteen LGBTQ-identified young adults ages 18 to 24. The interviewees were recruited from an LGBTQ youth-serving organization using a purposive sampling approach to reflect racial/ethnic and gender identity diversity. Following the interviews, eight of the participants engaged as co-researchers on a participatory action research (PAR) team for sixteen weeks. The process of this team's work was assessed through a reflective analysis to identify factors that impacted the participants' lives. Analysis of the interviews identified key themes related to identity among the LGBTQ young people. The interviewees experienced a multiplicity of identities that were both socially and individually constructed. These identities were impacted by their immediate and social environments. The young people also identified ways that they used their identities to influence their environments and enhance their own resilience. The service experiences and needs of the LGBTQ young people in this study were directly influenced by their multiple identities. Implications for intersectional approaches to serving this population are explored. Analysis of the PAR process identified four areas in which the young people were most impacted through their work and interactions with one another: relationships, communication, participation, and inclusion. Implications for research and service approaches with LGBTQ young people are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013