Matching Items (10)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

Musikalischer Parnassus by Johann Kaspar Ferdinand Fischer (1656-1746): guitar transcription and performance guide of Suites VI and VIII

Description

Guitar repertoire from the Baroque period consists primarily of transcriptions, which suggests that modern performers may explore more sources to identify eligible works to transcribe. The Musikalischer Parnassus, a collection

Guitar repertoire from the Baroque period consists primarily of transcriptions, which suggests that modern performers may explore more sources to identify eligible works to transcribe. The Musikalischer Parnassus, a collection of dance suites for harpsichord by Johann Kaspar Ferdinand Fischer (1656-1746), is worthy of such a transcription. This collection has high artistic value and possesses a range and texture that make much of it playable on the guitar. The purpose of this research project is to introduce Fischer and his works to the classical guitar community, and also to explore the artistic qualities of Musikalischer Parnassus that qualify it for transcription for guitar. This document addresses the transcription process of two selected suites: VI, Euterpe and VIII, Polymnia by Fischer. The outcome is an edition for guitar and a performance guide, which includes interpretations and stylistic considerations for each movement.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

150431-Thumbnail Image.png

A new piano reduction of the Sibelius violin concerto with commentary

Description

Playing an orchestral reduction is not always the most joyous of times for pianists. As pianists, we have to express a reduced idea of all the instruments and orchestral textures

Playing an orchestral reduction is not always the most joyous of times for pianists. As pianists, we have to express a reduced idea of all the instruments and orchestral textures that are in the full score. However, in many cases, there are often omissions, errors or discrepancies in the existing published reductions. These reductions are made by a variety of people: editors, conductors, pianists, but rarely by the composer, and often do not reflect the composer's true intentions. While many reductions are technically playable, including the reduction of the Sibelius Violin Concerto that will form the basis of this paper, the arrangement of the orchestration can be obscured or inaccurate to the point where the violin soloist may not be receiving the best representation of the actual orchestration. A piano reduction should as closely as possible represent the original intention of the composer, both for the sake of the audience and the performers. The pianist should be able to provide the proper support and orchestration of any reduction for the instrumentalist or vocalist so that the same performance style and technique can be used while performing with either a piano reduction or a full orchestra. This research document contains a detailed examination of the various orchestral reductions of the Sibelius Violin Concerto, culminating in a new version by the author. In this discussion, the author will present a basic understanding of how to orchestrate at the piano through an in-depth explanation of piano skill and technique, practice techniques such as listening to a recorded version of the full orchestration while playing the piano, and ways to study and revise an existing piano reduction. The current published reductions of the Sibelius Violin Concerto contain many errors and discrepancies and will be contrasted with the author's own reduction, available for comparison and study in the appendix. This new revised reduction will clearly show the orchestral instruments represented throughout the score, demonstrate new techniques for various orchestral textures, and will yield a playable product that more closely represents the composer's original intentions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

151610-Thumbnail Image.png

Arrows of time: a transcription of Richard Peaslee's trombone solo for brass band

Description

This thesis presents a new arrangement of Richard Peaslee's trombone solo "Arrows of Time" for brass band. This arrangement adapts Peaslee's orchestration - and subsequent arrangement by Dr. Joshua Hauser

This thesis presents a new arrangement of Richard Peaslee's trombone solo "Arrows of Time" for brass band. This arrangement adapts Peaslee's orchestration - and subsequent arrangement by Dr. Joshua Hauser for wind ensemble - for the modern brass band instrumentation and includes a full score. A brief biography of Richard Peaslee and his work accompanies this new arrangement, along with commentary on the orchestration of "Arrows of Time", and discussion of the evolution and adaptation of the work for wind ensemble by Dr. Hauser. The methodology used to adapt these versions for the brass band completes the background information.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

Five keyboard sonatas: R. 48, 50, 60, 106 and 114 by Antonio Soler, arranged for two guitars

Description

Arrangements of music from other instruments have always played a key role in expanding the guitar repertoire. This project investigates the life and work of eighteenth-century composer Antonio Soler (1729-1783),

Arrangements of music from other instruments have always played a key role in expanding the guitar repertoire. This project investigates the life and work of eighteenth-century composer Antonio Soler (1729-1783), specifically his sonatas for solo keyboard. This study carries out a formal inquiry on Soler's influences, including a background of Soler's life and training, his connection with Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757), and an overview of the eighteenth-century sonata in Spain. Timbres, articulations, tessitura, and other aspects of Spanish folk music are discussed as related to Soler's composition style. Five sonatas are analyzed in connection to Spanish folk music, and part of this study's focus was arranging the sonatas for two guitars: R. 48, 50, 60, 106 and 114. An overview of the current arrangements of Soler's sonatas for guitar is included in Appendix A.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

152405-Thumbnail Image.png

Serenade in D major by Johannes Brahms: aranged for solo guitar

Description

The German pianist and composer Johannes Brahms (1883-1897) wrote more than 122 works for a wide variety of ensembles and genres. Despite this remarkable productivity, and his widely heralded talent

The German pianist and composer Johannes Brahms (1883-1897) wrote more than 122 works for a wide variety of ensembles and genres. Despite this remarkable productivity, and his widely heralded talent for innovation and technique as a composer, few of his works have been arranged for solo guitar, and these have focused primarily on his simpler, more melodic works. Conventional wisdom is that his music is "too dense" to be played on the guitar. As a result, there are no arrangements of orchestral works by Brahms in the standard repertoire for the guitar. In arranging Brahms's Serenade in D Major, movt. 1 for the guitar, I provide a counter argument that not all of Brahms's orchestral music is too dense all of the time. In Part I, I provide a brief overview of the history of, and sources for, the Serenade. Part II describes a step-by-step guide through the process of arranging orchestral repertoire for the solo guitar. Part III is an examination of the editing process that utilizes examples from the guitar arrangement of the Serenade in order to illustrate the various techniques and considerations that are part of the editing process. Part IV is a performance edition of the arrangement. In summary, the present arrangement of Brahms's Serenade, op.11 is the beginning of a conversation about why the "guitar world" should be incorporating the music of Brahms into the standard repertoire. The lessons learned, and the technical challenges discovered, should help inform future arrangers and guitar performers for additional compositions by Brahms.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

153128-Thumbnail Image.png

Selected harpsichord works by Sebastián de Albero: arranged for solo guitar

Description

This project presents eight harpsichord sonatas, 3, 5, 10, 12, 13, 18, 19, and 21, by Sebastián de Albero (1722-1756), arranged for the classical guitar. These pieces were chosen because

This project presents eight harpsichord sonatas, 3, 5, 10, 12, 13, 18, 19, and 21, by Sebastián de Albero (1722-1756), arranged for the classical guitar. These pieces were chosen because of the success of other eighteenth-century Iberian harpsichord music that has been arranged for guitar, including works by composers such as Domenico Scarlatti, Carlos Seixas, and Antonio Soler. The popularity and enjoyment of Scarlatti's harpsichord sonatas on the guitar today was the inspiration for this project.

Historically, guitarists have used arrangements as a means to expand the guitar's repertoire. The late eighteenth century, especially, was a time in which the instrument was undergoing significant changes from being a five-course instrument into becoming the standard six single string instrument of today. Also, composer/guitarists at that time were beginning to abandon tablature in favor of modern staff notation. Because of these changes, the amount of music originally written for the guitar from this period that is suitable to be played on a modern instrument is limited.

I chose to focus on eight selected sonatas from Sebastián Albero's Treinta Sonatas para Clavicordio because of the influence of Domenico Scarlatti's harpsichord arrangements for solo guitar. It is intriguing to note that Albero and Scarlatti both held positions at the Spanish Royal Chapel for a number of years and, in this capacity, may have influenced one another in their musical compositions and style. Certain similarities are documented in this paper.

Since Scarlatti's music has been successfully arranged, and is popular to play on modern guitar, it is hoped that these sonatas by Albero may enjoy similar success.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

153082-Thumbnail Image.png

Performing Heinrich Biber's Mystery sonatas on solo guitar, and principles for arranging early Baroque solo sonatas

Description

This is a solo guitar transcription of the first five movements, known as the "Joyous Mysteries," of the Mystery Sonatas by Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber, accompanied by a history

This is a solo guitar transcription of the first five movements, known as the "Joyous Mysteries," of the Mystery Sonatas by Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber, accompanied by a history of the sonata collection, an analysis of the process of translating a Baroque solo sonata to the guitar, and a guide for performance. The work was chosen because of its significance and popularity within violin repertoire, and the suitability of the solo sonata genre for performance on a guitar. The first section of this project addresses the history and appeal of Biber and the Mystery Sonatas. It is supplemented by a brief survey of guitar transcriptions of Biber's compositions, and the value of the present edition in modern guitar literature. The second section explores the process and challenges of arranging the Mystery Sonatas for solo guitar, followed by a summation of the general allowances and limitations the genre offers to arrangers. The third section focuses on performance practice issues encountered in adapting this series and other Baroque solo sonatas to the guitar. The project concludes with the arrangement, complemented with the original violin and continuo parts for comparison.

Although instrumentations may force an arranger to impose speculative harmonies and countermelodies on a thin texture or sacrifice inner voices in a denser texture, the solo sonata's instrumentation of melody and continuo provides an effective balance. This style allows an arranger three important details: a clear and paramount melody, a flexible bass line, and harmonies with unspecified voicings. Similarly, the compositional freedom that Baroque composers allowed to performers also facilitates the arranging process and enables a variety of creative solutions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

150294-Thumbnail Image.png

Three early twentieth century tango songs arranged for brass quintet

Description

Despite a quickly growing repertoire list for the brass quintet, the music of the early Argentine tango has remained relatively neglected by brass quintet arrangers and performers. With the goal

Despite a quickly growing repertoire list for the brass quintet, the music of the early Argentine tango has remained relatively neglected by brass quintet arrangers and performers. With the goal of bringing a neglected art form to the brass quintet repertoire, three arrangements based on early twentieth century Argentine tango songs are presented here: "Elegante Papirusa" by Tito Roccatagliata, "A La Gran Muñeca" by Jesús Ventura, and "La Cotorrita" by Samuel Castriota. The arrangements follow the style of three early recordings produced by The Victor Talking Machine in 1920 and 1922, as performed by two authentic Argentine orquesta típicas: Orquesta Típica Select and Orquesta Típica Fresedo. A brief history of the style and instrumental evolution of tango music from its influences and origins up until 1920 is discussed, followed by a detailed account of the musicians and circumstances involved in the three early recordings. An explanation of the issues encountered by the author in adapting the early tango style to the brass quintet setting is discussed, along with the solutions realized in order to make the project successful and practical for a moderately advanced brass quintet. The full brass quintet scores are provided as part of the Appendix.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

A transcription of four viola works by York Bowen for clarinet and piano

Description

Works for clarinet in the twentieth century exist in abundance; furthermore, the number of extant works from the Classical period is substantial. However, works for solo clarinet in the late-Romantic

Works for clarinet in the twentieth century exist in abundance; furthermore, the number of extant works from the Classical period is substantial. However, works for solo clarinet in the late-Romantic style are lacking; most of the significant literature for clarinet is contained in orchestral works. Therefore, the purpose of this project is to add to the solo clarinet repertoire of the late Romantic-style through the transcription of works written originally for viola. The four works transcribed for this project are by York Bowen. Bowen was a British composer and pianist who taught at the Royal Academy of Music in England. Although his career flourished in the twentieth century, his music reflects the music of the late-Romantic style. The project includes a transcription of Bowen's Sonata No. 1 in C minor, Op. 18 for viola and piano, Sonata No. 2 in F major, Op. 22 for viola and piano, Romance in D-flat for viola and piano, and Phantasy in F, Op. 54 for viola and piano. Additionally, a brief examination of Bowen's life, an overview of each piece, details regarding transcription parts, a list of changes made to the original part, and a recording of each transcription is included in the document.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

154359-Thumbnail Image.png

New editions of G. P. Telemann's Sonata in F minor TWV 41:f1 and N. A. Rimsky-Korsakov's Concerto for trombone

Description

Nikolay Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov’s Concerto for Trombone and Military Band and Georg Philipp Telemann’s Sonata in F minor TWV 41:f1 are two works from contrasting periods written by well-known composers. International

Nikolay Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov’s Concerto for Trombone and Military Band and Georg Philipp Telemann’s Sonata in F minor TWV 41:f1 are two works from contrasting periods written by well-known composers. International Music Company first published the Sonata in 1968 for trombone, edited by Allen Ostrander. Rimsky-Korsakov’s Concerto for Trombone was first published in the United States by Leeds Music Corporation in 1952, edited by Davis Shuman. Both of these compositions contain editorial concerns that detract from each composer’s original music.

In most modern editions, Rimsky-Korsakov’s Concerto is accompanied by a piano reduction made by Nikolay Sergeyevich Fedoseyev. Although this reduction is the most commonly used accompaniment today, it is overly difficult for the pianist. The reduction also alters musical gestures within the accompaniment written by Rimsky-Korsakov.

This project contrasts modern editions of each composition with their oldest known manuscript. For Telemann’s Sonata, this is the first publication in Der Getreue Music-Meister, published by the composer in 1728-29. For Rimsky-Korsakov’s Concerto, this is a copyist’s manuscript that is currently housed at the library of the Moscow State Academic Philharmonic. The centerpiece of this project is the preparation of new solo parts for each work and a new piano reduction for Rimsky-Korsakov’s Concerto that restores the composer’s original intentions and makes clear editorial changes and suggestions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016