Matching Items (3)

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Temperature dependent qualities of amorphous silicon and amorphous silicon carbide passivating stacks

Description

Layers of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon and amorphous silicon carbide

were prepared on a polished, intrinsic crystalline silicon substrate via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to simulate heterojunction device relevant stacks of

Layers of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon and amorphous silicon carbide

were prepared on a polished, intrinsic crystalline silicon substrate via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to simulate heterojunction device relevant stacks of various materials. The minority carrier lifetime, optical band gap and FTIR spectra were observed at incremental stages of thermal annealing. By observing the changes in the lifetimes the sample structure responsible for the most thermally robust surface passivation could be determined. These results were correlated to the optical band gap and the position and relative area of peaks in the FTIR spectra related to to silicon-hydrogen bonds in the layers. It was found that due to an increased presence of hydrogen bonded to silicon at voids within the passivating layer, hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide at the interface of the substrate coupled with a hydrogenated amorphous silicon top layer provides better passivation after high temperature annealing than other device structures.

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Date Created
  • 2016

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Nanowire specialty diodes for integrated applications

Description

Semiconductor nanowires are important candidates for highly scaled three dimensional electronic devices. It is very advantageous to combine their scaling capability with the high yield of planar CMOS technology by

Semiconductor nanowires are important candidates for highly scaled three dimensional electronic devices. It is very advantageous to combine their scaling capability with the high yield of planar CMOS technology by integrating nanowire devices into planar circuits. The purpose of this research is to identify the challenges associated with the fabrication of vertically oriented Si and Ge nanowire diodes and modeling their electrical behavior so that they can be utilized to create unique three dimensional architectures that can boost the scaling of electronic devices into the next generation. In this study, vertical Ge and Si nanowire Schottky diodes have been fabricated using bottom-up vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) and top-down reactive ion etching (RIE) approaches respectively. VLS growth yields nanowires with atomically smooth sidewalls at sub-50 nm diameters but suffers from the problem that the doping increases radially outwards from the core of the devices. RIE is much faster than VLS and does not suffer from the problem of non-uniform doping. However, it yields nanowires with rougher sidewalls and gets exceedingly inefficient in yielding vertical nanowires for diameters below 50 nm. The I-V characteristics of both Ge and Si nanowire diodes cannot be adequately fit by the thermionic emission model. Annealing in forming gas which passivates dangling bonds on the nanowire surface is shown to have a considerable impact on the current through the Si nanowire diodes indicating that fixed charges and traps on the surface of the devices play a major role in determining their electrical behavior. Also, due to the vertical geometry of the nanowire diodes, electric field lines originating from the metal and terminating on their sidewalls can directly modulate their conductivity. Both these effects have to be included in the model aimed at predicting the current through vertical nanowire diodes. This study shows that the current through vertical nanowire diodes cannot be predicted accurately using the thermionic emission model which is suitable for planar devices and identifies the factors needed to build a comprehensive analytical model for predicting the current through vertically oriented nanowire diodes.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Corrosion and passivation of Mg-Al and Ni-Cr alloys

Description

In this dissertation, micro-galvanic corrosion effects and passivation behavior of single-phase binary alloys have been studied in order to formulate new insights towards the development of “stainless-like” lightweight alloys. As

In this dissertation, micro-galvanic corrosion effects and passivation behavior of single-phase binary alloys have been studied in order to formulate new insights towards the development of “stainless-like” lightweight alloys. As a lightweight material of interest, Mg-xAl alloys were studied using aqueous free corrosion, atmospheric corrosion, dissolution rate kinetics, and ionic liquid dissolution. Polarization and “accelerated” free corrosion studies in aqueous chloride were used to characterize the corrosion behavior and morphology of alloys. Atmospheric corrosion experiments revealed surface roughness and pH evolution behavior in aqueous environment. Dissolution in absence of water using choline-chloride:urea ionic liquid allowed for a simpler dissolution mechanism to be observed, providing additional insights regarding surface mobility of Al. These results were compared with commercial alloy (AZ31B, AM60, and AZ91D) behavior to better elucidate effects associated with secondary phases and intermetallic particles often present in Mg alloys. Aqueous free corrosion, “accelerated” free corrosion and ionic liquid dissolution studies have confirmed Al surface enrichment in a variety of morphologies, including Al-rich platelet and Al nanowire formation. This behavior is attributed to the preferential dissolution of Al as the more “noble” element in the matrix. Inductively-coupled mass spectroscopy was used to measure first-order rate reaction constants for elemental Mg and Al dissolution in aqueous chloride environment to be kMg= 9.419 x 10-6 and kAl = 2.103 x 10-6 for future implementation in kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. To better understand how “stainless-like” passivation may be achieved, Ni-xCr alloys were studied using polarization and potential pulse experiments. The passivation potential, critical current density, and passivation current density were found to decay with increasing Cr composition. The measured average number of monolayers dissolved during passivation was found to be in good agreement with percolation theory, with a fitted 3-D percolation threshold of p_c^3D=0.118 compared with the theoretical value of 0.137. Using these results, possible approaches towards achieving passivation in other systems, including Mg-Al, are discussed.

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Date Created
  • 2018