Matching Items (3)

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Misconceptions of emergent semiconductor phenomena

Description

The semiconductor field of Photovoltaics (PV) has experienced tremendous growth, requiring curricula to consider ways to promote student success. One major barrier to success students may face when learning PV

The semiconductor field of Photovoltaics (PV) has experienced tremendous growth, requiring curricula to consider ways to promote student success. One major barrier to success students may face when learning PV is the development of misconceptions. The purpose of this work was to determine the presence and prevalence of misconceptions students may have for three PV semiconductor phenomena; Diffusion, Drift and Excitation. These phenomena are emergent, a class of phenomena that have certain characteristics. In emergent phenomena, the individual entities in the phenomena interact and aggregate to form a self-organizing pattern that can be observed at a higher level. Learners develop a different type of misconception for these phenomena, an emergent misconception. Participants (N=41) completed a written protocol. The pilot study utilized half of these protocols (n = 20) to determine the presence of both general and emergent misconceptions for the three phenomena. Once the presence of both general and emergent misconceptions was confirmed, all protocols (N=41) were analyzed to determine the presence and prevalence of general and emergent misconceptions, and to note any relationships among these misconceptions (full study). Through written protocol analysis of participants' responses, numerous codes emerged from the data for both general and emergent misconceptions. General and emergent misconceptions were found in 80% and 55% of participants' responses, respectively. General misconceptions indicated limited understandings of chemical bonding, electricity and magnetism, energy, and the nature of science. Participants also described the phenomena using teleological, predictable, and causal traits, indicating participants had misconceptions regarding the emergent aspects of the phenomena. For both general and emergent misconceptions, relationships were observed between similar misconceptions within and across the three phenomena, and differences in misconceptions were observed across the phenomena. Overall, the presence and prevalence of both general and emergent misconceptions indicates that learners have limited understandings of the physical and emergent mechanisms for the phenomena. Even though additional work is required, the identification of specific misconceptions can be utilized to enhance semiconductor and PV course content. Specifically, changes can be made to curriculum in order to limit the formation of misconceptions as well as promote conceptual change.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Exploring the Efficacy of Using Augmented Reality to Alleviate Common Misconceptions about Natural Selection

Description

Evidence suggests that Augmented Reality (AR) may be a powerful tool for

alleviating certain, lightly held scientific misconceptions. However, many

misconceptions surrounding the theory of evolution are deeply held

Evidence suggests that Augmented Reality (AR) may be a powerful tool for

alleviating certain, lightly held scientific misconceptions. However, many

misconceptions surrounding the theory of evolution are deeply held and resistant to

change. This study examines whether AR can serve as an effective tool for alleviating

these misconceptions by comparing the change in the number of misconceptions

expressed by users of a tablet-based version of a well-established classroom simulation to

the change in the number of misconceptions expressed by users of AR versions of the

simulation.

The use of realistic representations of objects is common for many AR

developers. However, this contradicts well-tested practices of multimedia design that

argue against the addition of unnecessary elements. This study also compared the use of

representational visualizations in AR, in this case, models of ladybug beetles, to symbolic

representations, in this case, colored circles.

To address both research questions, a one-factor, between-subjects experiment

was conducted with 189 participants randomly assigned to one of three conditions: non

AR, symbolic AR, and representational AR. Measures of change in the number and types

of misconceptions expressed, motivation, and time on task were examined using a pair of

planned orthogonal contrasts designed to test the study’s two research questions.

Participants in the AR-based condition showed a significantly smaller change in

the number of total misconceptions expressed after the treatment as well as in the number

of misconceptions related to intentionality; none of the other misconceptions examined

showed a significant difference. No significant differences were found in the total

number of misconceptions expressed between participants in the representative and

symbolic AR-based conditions, or on motivation. Contrary to the expectation that the

simulation would alleviate misconceptions, the average change in the number of

misconceptions expressed by participants increased. This is theorized to be due to the

juxtaposition of virtual and real-world entities resulting in a reduction in assumed

intentionality.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Biogeochemistry science and education: part one, using non-traditional stable isotopes as environmental tracers : part two, identifying and measuring undergraduate misconceptions in biogeochemistry

Description

This dissertation is presented in two sections. First, I explore two methods of using stable isotope analysis to trace environmental and biogeochemical processes. Second, I present two related studies investigating

This dissertation is presented in two sections. First, I explore two methods of using stable isotope analysis to trace environmental and biogeochemical processes. Second, I present two related studies investigating student understanding of the biogeochemical concepts that underlie part one. Fe and Hg are each biogeochemically important elements in their own way. Fe is a critical nutrient for phytoplankton, while Hg is detrimental to nearly all forms of life. Fe is often a limiting factor in marine phytoplankton growth. The largest source, by mass, of Fe to the open ocean is windblown mineral dust, but other more soluble sources are more bioavailable. To look for evidence of these non-soil dust sources of Fe to the open ocean, I measured the isotopic composition of aerosol samples collected on Bermuda. I found clear evidence in the fine size fraction of a non-soil dust Fe source, which I conclude is most likely from biomass burning. Widespread adoption of compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) has increased their importance as a source of environmental Hg. Isotope analysis would be a useful tool in quantifying this impact if the isotopic composition of Hg from CFL were known. My measurements show that CFL-Hg is isotopically fractionated, in a unique pattern, during normal operation. This fractionation is large and has a distinctive, mass-independent signature, such that CFL Hg can be uniquely identified from other sources. Misconceptions research in geology has been a very active area of research, but student thinking regarding the related field of biogeochemistry has not yet been studied in detail. From interviews with 40 undergraduates, I identified over 150 specific misconceptions. I also designed a multiple-choice survey (concept inventory) to measure understanding of these same biogeochemistry concepts. I present statistical evidence, based on the Rasch model, for the reliability and validity of this instrument. This instrument will allow teachers and researchers to easily quantify learning outcomes in biogeochemistry and will complement existing concept inventories in geology, chemistry, and biology.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014