Matching Items (4)

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First-generation strength: supporting first-generation college students in study abroad

Description

First-generation college students are an underrepresented group in terms of study

abroad participation nationally and at Arizona State University (ASU). The ASU and

International Studies Abroad (ISA) Planning Scholars Scholarship Program was

developed

First-generation college students are an underrepresented group in terms of study

abroad participation nationally and at Arizona State University (ASU). The ASU and

International Studies Abroad (ISA) Planning Scholars Scholarship Program was

developed to support first-generation college students in their pursuit of study abroad.

This mixed-methods study examined what the specific needs of first-generation college

students are as they pursue study abroad experiences and what effect the ASU and ISA

Planning Scholars Program had on them. A combination of surveys, semi-structured

interviews, and a photovoice project provided data for the study. Key findings included

that first-generation college students had concerns about finances, finding a study abroad

program that would keep them on track for graduation, making friends while they study

abroad, and traveling abroad alone. The study indicated that the Planning Scholars

program did increase students’ confidence in pursuing study abroad. Additionally, the

theory of First-Generation Strength was developed which suggests that first-generation

college students possess certain strengths and capital that help them overcome a variety

of new obstacles and make them an ideal candidate for study abroad due to their

experiences with having to navigate new contexts, such as going to college,

independently.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Enlightened travelers?: cultural attitudes, cultural competency and study abroad

Description

In this study the impact of outside the classroom activities and experiences of study abroad participants on cultural attitude change and perceived cultural competence was investigated. Motives to participate, expectations

In this study the impact of outside the classroom activities and experiences of study abroad participants on cultural attitude change and perceived cultural competence was investigated. Motives to participate, expectations and outcomes of study abroad programs were also explored. The study used a mixed methods approach and was conducted in three parts including an exploratory sequential component followed by a concurrent embedded component. The exploratory sequential component included a photo elicitation project, the results of which contributed both to the results of the study and the development of the questionnaire used in the concurrent embedded component. The concurrent embedded component used a pre and post-test survey design and included a qualitative writing exercise with select participants between the completion of their pre and post-test questionnaires. The results suggest that study abroad participation does result in changes in both participants' cultural attitudes and cultural competency. It was hypothesized that length of time abroad and the cultural distance of the host country would have an influence on the change in cultural attitudes and cultural competency. As found in previous research, length of time abroad was not found to be a major contributing factor to this change when considering the results of the pre and post-test survey. However, the results of the qualitative studies resulted in many questions about the impact of length abroad. Participants in longer-term programs discussed changes in their cultural attitudes in a more complex way than short-term participants. Longer-term participants expressed changes in their cultural competency differently as well, though not in a way that it can be conclusively said they were more culturally competent. The reverse was the case for cultural distance. Cultural distance was a factor in the changes in cultural competency, however not in cultural attitudes when considering the results of the quantitative component. The qualitative results seem to bring up more questions. While shorter-term participants discussed cultural competency differently than longer-term participants, surprisingly the short-term programs had a higher percentage of participants studying in countries with large cultural distance than did long-term programs.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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The development and implementation of a pre-international experience course: a cultural intervention in a university setting

Description

The purpose of this mixed methods research study was to assess the impact and influence of a pre-international experience course on Arizona State University (ASU) students before they study or

The purpose of this mixed methods research study was to assess the impact and influence of a pre-international experience course on Arizona State University (ASU) students before they study or intern abroad. Currently, the study abroad pre-departure orientation for ASU participants consists of online modules and a two-hour face-to-face orientation. In this action research study, the practitioner-researcher re-designed an ASU School of Politics and Global Studies (SPGS), one-credit course that focused exclusively on cross-cultural awareness and sensitivity. A needs assessment was distributed to a sample of 800 returning study abroad participants and was used to influence the study, along with an extensive literature review and two cycles of action research. The dissertation research and study was conducted during the ASU fall 2013 semester. Quantitative data and qualitative data were collected using eight different measures. To better understand the impact of a pre-international experience curriculum for ASU study abroad and international internship participants before they go abroad, this research study investigated the following research questions: (1) What cultural impact does a pre-international experience course have on students who complete the course before studying or interning abroad? (2) What specific cultural competencies are gained by the participants after participating in the pre-international experience course? (3) How has developing the curriculum, teaching the curriculum and implementing the innovation influenced and informed my practice as an international educator and the Assistant Director of the Arizona State Study Abroad Office? The following five assertions were identified within the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the collected data to answer the three research questions: (1) Students are more confident in their abilities to cross cultures after successfully completing taking the new course; (2) Students are more aware of other cultures and their own culture after successfully completing taking the new course; (3) Students gained important knowledge about understanding others' worldviews after successfully completing taking the new course; (4) Students gained general openness toward intercultural learning and to people from cultures different from their own after successfully completing the new course; (5) Developing and implementing a pre-international experience course changed me as a leader, instructor and researcher. Implications for future implementation and research are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Education abroad as a catalyst for impactful global development: the global impact of the missing focus on the re-entry phase

Description

Education abroad participants worldwide are often positively transformed by their experiences and, as a result, gain a great deal of knowledge, resources, ideas, and high levels of inspiration which can

Education abroad participants worldwide are often positively transformed by their experiences and, as a result, gain a great deal of knowledge, resources, ideas, and high levels of inspiration which can positively impact the individual, and local and global communities—contributing to global development. However, education abroad participants face challenges and are often not prepared for making lasting positive change in their local and global communities post-education abroad, known as the reentry phase. Moreover, they do not fully understand the potential positive impacts they can have on society as a result of their education abroad experiences. This is of significant importance for a world that continues to rapidly globalize, advance technologically faster than ever before, and faces challenges and opportunities that require globally experienced people. Through surveys and interviews with 156 participants from 32 countries, this transformative mixed methods research provides strong evidence for the high levels of benefits participants gain, and how they are positively transformed and motivated to make local and global impacts after their education abroad experiences. The data provides insights into participant perceptions, ideas, opportunities, and challenges surrounding these topics, and identifies differences and similarities in participant and program types that best prepare, support, and enable participants during the re-entry phase. It also provides insights on how stakeholders (e.g. educational, public, private, non-governmental, civil society, and personal support systems) can transform current research, models, and policies to be able to support participants in becoming social entrepreneur change agents, and forge a more holistic approach towards global education mobility and global development. The more than 4.5 million people that currently engage in education abroad annually is a population projected to increase to more than 8 million participants by 2025. They represent only 0.06% of the world’s 7 billion population from almost all countries, including developing, emerging, and highly developed. Therefore, this unique population of highly educated and globally exposed future world leaders and decision-makers represents a comparatively uniquely privileged group that have the potential (and responsibility) to make important global development impacts after their education abroad experiences.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016