Matching Items (3)

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iPhone applications and improvement in weight and health parameters: a randomized controlled trial

Description

Dietary counseling from a registered dietitian has been shown in previous studies to aid in weight loss for those receiving counseling. With the increasing use of smartphone diet/weight loss applications (app), this study sought to investigate if an iPhone diet

Dietary counseling from a registered dietitian has been shown in previous studies to aid in weight loss for those receiving counseling. With the increasing use of smartphone diet/weight loss applications (app), this study sought to investigate if an iPhone diet app providing feedback from a registered dietitian improved weight loss and bio-markers of health. Twenty-four healthy adults who owned iPhones (BMI > 24 kg/m2) completed this trial. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three app groups: the MyDietitian app with daily feedback from a registered dietitian (n=7), the MyDietitian app without feedback (n=7), and the MyPlate feedback control app (n=10). Participants used their respective diet apps daily for 8-weeks while their weight loss, adherence to self-monitoring, blood bio-markers of health, and physical activity were monitored. All of the groups had a significant reduction in waist and hip circumference (p<0.001), a reduction in A1c (p=0.002), an increase in HDL cholesterol levels (p=0.012), and a reduction in calories consumed (p=0.022) over the duration of the trial. Adherence to diet monitoring via the apps did not differ between groups during the study. Body weight did not change during the study for any groups. However, when the participants were divided into low (<50% of days) or high adherence (>50% of days) groups, irrespective of study group, the high adherence group had a significant reduction in weight when compared to the low adherence group (p=0.046). These data suggest that diet apps may be useful tools for self-monitoring and even weight loss, but that the value appears to be the self-monitoring process and not the app specifically.

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Date Created
2014

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TEXT2COPE program for parents of overweight or obese preschool-aged children

Description

Children are five times more likely to be overweight at the age of 12 years if they are overweight during the preschool period, and 60% of overweight preschoolers are overweight at the age of 12 years (Matusik & Malecka-Tendera, 2011).

Children are five times more likely to be overweight at the age of 12 years if they are overweight during the preschool period, and 60% of overweight preschoolers are overweight at the age of 12 years (Matusik & Malecka-Tendera, 2011). Primary care interventions are urgently needed to improve healthy lifestyle behaviors in families. Parental influence plays an important factor in the development of healthy behaviors in children. Cognitive behavioral interventions have demonstrated preliminary success in promoting healthy lifestyle behaviors in both adults and children. Mobile technology used to supplement interventions aimed at behavior change offers an outlet to bridge gaps in health disparities and generate innovative evidence. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to establish the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effects of a cognitive-behavioral intervention (TEXT2COPE) synergized with mobile technology on the healthy lifestyle behaviors of parents of overweight and obese preschoolers. Primary aims of the proposed pilot study were to (a) examine the feasibility and acceptability of the TEXT2COPE program among parents of overweight or obese preschoolers with mobile phones; (b) evaluate the preliminary effects of the TEXT2COPE program on healthy lifestyle behaviors in families with overweight or obese preschoolers; and (c) evaluate the relationship among the study variables (i.e., cognitive beliefs, perceived difficulty, and healthy lifestyle behaviors). Findings indicate that this program is feasible and acceptable in this population. The intervention improved healthy lifestyle beliefs and behaviors in parents. Further supported are the interconnected relationships between parental beliefs, thoughts, and behaviors.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2014

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Experience, communication and trust: the role of cultural health navigators in mediating refugee families' access to health literacy and pediatrics care

Description

This dissertation explores findings from a year-long investigation of the context-driven practices, strategies and beliefs of five multilingual Cultural Health Navigators (CHNs) working in a local pediatrics clinic serving large numbers of refugee families from a variety of cultural backgrounds

This dissertation explores findings from a year-long investigation of the context-driven practices, strategies and beliefs of five multilingual Cultural Health Navigators (CHNs) working in a local pediatrics clinic serving large numbers of refugee families from a variety of cultural backgrounds who are experiencing a range of healthcare challenges. Grounded in a methodology of engagement (Grabill, 2010), this inquiry systematically documents and analyzes the range of ways in which the CHNs assist refugee families and their healthcare providers, their rationale for the decisions made and actions taken, and their concerns about the challenges they encounter. I show that while much of what the CHNs do to assist refugee families and their healthcare providers is routine and can be expected, CHNs also tend to manage complex work involved in mediating refugee families’ interactions with healthcare providers and the healthcare system in ways that cannot always be anticipated in advance. Through a close analysis of their practices and reflections, I show how their various interactions, actions and decisions are responsive to specifics of the situation at hand, informed by their lived experiences as CHNs and immigrants/refugees, and influenced by a dynamic, emergent and embodied notion of context. The findings of this study demonstrate how the CHNs’ collective and distributed knowledge production work shapes experiences with acquiring health literacy, and the material consequences of such efforts and practices.

Drawing on ethnographic research methods and critical-incident methodologies that involved the CHNs in the inquiry process, this study provides a nuanced analysis of the different kinds of work they do, the constraints they encounter, and how they creatively respond to such constraints in real time. The findings demonstrate that a collaborative engagement with critical incidents as a method of intercultural inquiry facilitates a more robust and dynamic understanding of the distributed nature of decision-making practices and ways of knowing. Embodying sensitivity to situated ways of knowing and dynamic practices in institutional settings, this study demonstrates the value of combining social science methodologies with rhetorical inquiry methods to conduct interdisciplinary and cross-institutional research to address pressing social problems in ways that benefit historically marginalized groups.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2018