Matching Items (3)

151621-Thumbnail Image.png

Pregnancy and postpartum: a guide for singers

Description

The trained singer utilizes an awareness of her body as an instrument. When she becomes pregnant, her body changes in numerous ways to support the pregnancy. Many of these changes

The trained singer utilizes an awareness of her body as an instrument. When she becomes pregnant, her body changes in numerous ways to support the pregnancy. Many of these changes have great impact on her ability to sing during the pregnancy and postpartum periods. The voice may be altered positively or negatively by the release of hormones. The body undergoes many changes that affect the posture and breathing required for singing. Most notably, the abdominal muscles are greatly impacted by the pregnancy. They are stretched by the growing uterus, and this affects their function. In addition, the linea alba (the connective tissue between the halves of the rectus abdominis) is softened by hormonal increases and subject to stretching as the uterus grows, predisposing it to weakness. Since the other abdominal muscles attach to the linea alba via connective tissue, maintaining the integrity of the linea alba during pregnancy and postpartum is vital to the operational function of the abdominal muscles. Protecting the vulnerable linea alba must be deliberately undertaken in two parts. First, conscious exercise is needed to preserve the linea alba during pregnancy and to rehabilitate it after pregnancy. Targeted exercises strengthen the transverse abdominis and shorten and approximate the two halves of the rectus abdominis. Second, modifications in daily movement are necessary to protect the linea alba while performing routine activities. Cesarean sections present additional surgical concerns for singers, including abdominal incisions, use of medication, and the rare need for general anesthesia via intubation. Recovery from a cesarean can be difficult due to abdominal pain, yet steps may be taken to speed healing at the hospital and at home. This paper provides an overview of how pregnancy affects the singer, discusses the effects of pregnancy and cesarean section, and provides a plan to protect the abdominal muscles during pregnancy and rehabilitate them in the postpartum period. It combines information from the fields of physical therapy, medicine, and surgery into a guide for the singer and voice teacher.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

153964-Thumbnail Image.png

Interest in alternative approaches for gestational weight gain and maternal stress management: a survey

Description

Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) during pregnancy is a major public health concern. Studies have reported more than 70% of pregnant women gain excessive weight which may pose increased maternal

Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) during pregnancy is a major public health concern. Studies have reported more than 70% of pregnant women gain excessive weight which may pose increased maternal and fetal risks. Little is known about the relationships of GWG to behavioral factors (i.e., physical activity, sleep, social support) and maternal mental health (i.e., stress, anxiety, depression) during pregnancy. This descriptive, cross-sectional study explored the relationships of GWG to behavioral factors and maternal mental health during pregnancy. Secondarily, this study described the preferences, uses of, and interests in alternative approaches as well as the mental health differences between users and non-users of alternative approaches during pregnancy. A national survey was administered to women ≥8 weeks pregnant, ≥18 years old, and residing in the United States (N=968). Bivariate correlations were used to determine relationships between GWG and variables of interest. Independent t-tests were used to observe mental health differences between users and non-users of alternative approaches. Data were analyzed throughout pregnancy and by trimester. Throughout pregnancy, significant relationships were found in GWG to stressful events (r=-.112, p<.01), depression (r=.066, p<.05), mindfulness (r=-.067, p<.05), and sleep (r=.089, p<.01). When GWG was assessed by trimester, stressful events were significant in the second (r=-.216, p<.01) and third trimesters (r=-.085, p<.05). Depression remained positively related to GWG in the first (r=.409, p<.01) and second trimesters (r=.162, p<.01). A positive relationship emerged between GWG and anxiety in the first trimester (r=.340, p<.01) and physical activity became significant in the second (r=-.136; p<.05) and third trimesters (r=-.100; p<.05). Mindfulness was the only variable significantly related to GWG throughout all time points. Mean anxiety (d=.236; p=.001) and depression (d=.265; p<.001) scores were significantly lower in users compared to non-users of alternative approaches throughout pregnancy and when assessed by trimester anxiety (d=.424; p=.001) and depression (d=.526; p<.001) were significant in the second trimester. This study provides a framework for future analyses in GWG and maternal mental health. The information presented here may inform future interventions to test the effectiveness of alternative approaches to simultaneously manage maternal mental health and GWG due to the integrative nature of alternative approaches.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

154385-Thumbnail Image.png

A pilot study to assess nutrition knowledge and behaviors of low-income, pregnant adolescents and adult women

Description

Low income, pregnant adolescents have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as preterm birth, delivery of low birth weight babies and excessive gestational weight gain that increases the

Low income, pregnant adolescents have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as preterm birth, delivery of low birth weight babies and excessive gestational weight gain that increases the risk of postpartum overweight and obesity. Inadequate dietary intake is a modifiable risk factor that may differentially impact maternal health and fetal outcomes for pregnant adults and adolescents. To evaluate the effectiveness of a social media intervention on improving prenatal health knowledge and dietary intake, 22 racially diverse pregnant women (59% Black and 36% White) were recruited and adolescent (n=10) outcomes compared to those of adults (n=12) across the intervention. Pre- and post-intervention nutrition knowledge questionnaires and diet recalls were completed to assess nutrition knowledge and dietary intake. When assessing dietary change across the intervention, significant decreases in fat (pre vs. post, 97.9 ± 0.2 g vs. 90.2 ± 0.2 g, P=0.047) and folate intake (pre vs. post, 537.6 ± 0.3 μg vs. 531.2 ± 0.2 μg, P=0.041) were observed while significant increases in carbohydrate (pre vs. post, 318.9 ± 0.2 g vs. 335.9 ± 0.2 g, P<0.001), calcium (pre vs. post, 851.3 ± 0.3 mg vs. 893.5 ± 0.2 mg, P<0.001) and magnesium intakes (pre vs. post, 212.9 ± 0.2 mg vs. 227.8 ± 0.2 mg, P<0.001) occurred. These time effects occurred independent of group (adolescents vs. adults) as time*group interactions were not significant (p>0.05) with the exception of sugar intake. Increases in sugar intake across the intervention were greater among the adolescent group (adolescent vs. adult, 7.9 ± 0.2 g vs. 6.0 ± 0.2 g, P=0.023). Overall nutrition knowledge was limited and confusion regarding MyPlate recommendations persisted. The inadequate dietary behaviors observed suggest that future interventions should focus education on specific dietary nutrients such as added sugars and fiber to improve dietary intakes. The best way to actively engage pregnant adolescents is unknown: however, social media has the potential to reach teens and low-income women with education that may be key in allowing interventions to change dietary habits and behaviors.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016