Matching Items (3)

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Resource allocation in communication and social networks

Description

As networks are playing an increasingly prominent role in different aspects of our lives, there is a growing awareness that improving their performance is of significant importance. In order to enhance performance of networks, it is essential that scarce networking

As networks are playing an increasingly prominent role in different aspects of our lives, there is a growing awareness that improving their performance is of significant importance. In order to enhance performance of networks, it is essential that scarce networking resources be allocated smartly to match the continuously changing network environment. This dissertation focuses on two different kinds of networks - communication and social, and studies resource allocation problems in these networks. The study on communication networks is further divided into different networking technologies - wired and wireless, optical and mobile, airborne and terrestrial. Since nodes in an airborne network (AN) are heterogeneous and mobile, the design of a reliable and robust AN is highly complex. The dissertation studies connectivity and fault-tolerance issues in ANs and proposes algorithms to compute the critical transmission range in fault free, faulty and delay tolerant scenarios. Just as in the case of ANs, power optimization and fault tolerance are important issues in wireless sensor networks (WSN). In a WSN, a tree structure is often used to deliver sensor data to a sink node. In a tree, failure of a node may disconnect the tree. The dissertation investigates the problem of enhancing the fault tolerance capability of data gathering trees in WSN. The advent of OFDM technology provides an opportunity for efficient resource utilization in optical networks and also introduces a set of novel problems, such as routing and spectrum allocation (RSA) problem. This dissertation proves that RSA problem is NP-complete even when the network topology is a chain, and proposes approximation algorithms. In the domain of social networks, the focus of this dissertation is study of influence propagation in presence of active adversaries. In a social network multiple vendors may attempt to influence the nodes in a competitive fashion. This dissertation investigates the scenario where the first vendor has already chosen a set of nodes and the second vendor, with the knowledge of the choice of the first, attempts to identify a smallest set of nodes so that after the influence propagation, the second vendor's market share is larger than the first.

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Date Created
2014

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Design, analysis and resource allocations in networks in presence of region-based faults

Description

Communication networks, both wired and wireless, are expected to have a certain level of fault-tolerance capability.These networks are also expected to ensure a graceful degradation in performance when some of the network components fail. Traditional studies on fault tolerance in

Communication networks, both wired and wireless, are expected to have a certain level of fault-tolerance capability.These networks are also expected to ensure a graceful degradation in performance when some of the network components fail. Traditional studies on fault tolerance in communication networks, for the most part, make no assumptions regarding the location of node/link faults, i.e., the faulty nodes and links may be close to each other or far from each other. However, in many real life scenarios, there exists a strong spatial correlation among the faulty nodes and links. Such failures are often encountered in disaster situations, e.g., natural calamities or enemy attacks. In presence of such region-based faults, many of traditional network analysis and fault-tolerant metrics, that are valid under non-spatially correlated faults, are no longer applicable. To this effect, the main thrust of this research is design and analysis of robust networks in presence of such region-based faults. One important finding of this research is that if some prior knowledge is available on the maximum size of the region that might be affected due to a region-based fault, this piece of knowledge can be effectively utilized for resource efficient design of networks. It has been shown in this dissertation that in some scenarios, effective utilization of this knowledge may result in substantial saving is transmission power in wireless networks. In this dissertation, the impact of region-based faults on the connectivity of wireless networks has been studied and a new metric, region-based connectivity, is proposed to measure the fault-tolerance capability of a network. In addition, novel metrics, such as the region-based component decomposition number(RBCDN) and region-based largest component size(RBLCS) have been proposed to capture the network state, when a region-based fault disconnects the network. Finally, this dissertation presents efficient resource allocation techniques that ensure tolerance against region-based faults, in distributed file storage networks and data center networks.

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Date Created
2013

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Quantitative evaluation of control flow based soft error protection mechanisms

Description

Rapid technology scaling, the main driver of the power and performance improvements of computing solutions, has also rendered our computing systems extremely susceptible to transient errors called soft errors. Among the arsenal of techniques to protect computation from soft errors,

Rapid technology scaling, the main driver of the power and performance improvements of computing solutions, has also rendered our computing systems extremely susceptible to transient errors called soft errors. Among the arsenal of techniques to protect computation from soft errors, Control Flow Checking (CFC) based techniques have gained a reputation of effective, yet low-cost protection mechanism. The basic idea is that, there is a high probability that a soft-fault in program execution will eventually alter the control flow of the program. Therefore just by making sure that the control flow of the program is correct, significant protection can be achieved. More than a dozen techniques for CFC have been developed over the last several decades, ranging from hardware techniques, software techniques, and hardware-software hybrid techniques as well. Our analysis shows that existing CFC techniques are not only ineffective in protecting from soft errors, but cause additional power and performance overheads. For this analysis, we develop and validate a simulation based experimental setup to accurately and quantitatively estimate the architectural vulnerability of a program execution on a processor micro-architecture. We model the protection achieved by various state-of-the-art CFC techniques in this quantitative vulnerability estimation setup, and find out that software only CFC protection schemes (CFCSS, CFCSS+NA, CEDA) increase system vulnerability by 18% to 21% with 17% to 38% performance overhead. Hybrid CFC protection (CFEDC) increases vulnerability by 5%, while the vulnerability remains almost the same for hardware only CFC protection (CFCET); notwithstanding the hardware overheads of design cost, area, and power incurred in the hardware modifications required for their implementations.

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Date Created
2013