Matching Items (3)

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Validation of the Rapid Eating and Activity Assessment for diet quality measurement in young adult males

Description

The Rapid Eating and Activity Assessment for Participants Short Version (REAP-S), represents a method for rapid diet quality assessment, however, few studies have tested its validity. The Healthy Eating Index-2005

The Rapid Eating and Activity Assessment for Participants Short Version (REAP-S), represents a method for rapid diet quality assessment, however, few studies have tested its validity. The Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005) and the Diet Quality Index Revised (DQI-R) are tools that effectively assess diet quality, however, both are complex and time consuming. The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of the REAP-S against the HEI-2005 and the DQI-R. Fifty males, 18 to 33 years of age, completed the REAP-S as well as a 24-hour diet recall. HEI-2005 and DQI-R scores were determined for each 24-hour recall. Scores from the REAP-S were evaluated against the HEI-2005 and DQI-R scores using Spearman rank order correlations and chi square. Modifications were also made to the original method of scoring the REAP-S to evaluate how the correlations transformed when certain questions were removed. The correlation coefficient for REAP-S and the HEI-2005 was 0.367 (P=0.009), and the correlation coefficient for REAP-S and the DQI-R was 0.323 (P=0.022). Chi square determined precision of the REAP-S to the HEI-2005 for overall diet quality at 64% and 62% for the DQI-R and REAP-S. Scores that were considered extreme (n=21) by the HEI-2005 (scores <40 and >60) had 76% precision with REAP-S. The correlation for the modified version of scoring REAP-S with the overall HEI-2005 and DQI-R were 0.395 (P=0.005) and 0.417 (P=0.003) respectively. Chi square statistics revealed the REAP-S accurately captured the diets of high quality versus low quality with 64% precision to the HEI-2005 and 62% of the DQI-R. When evaluating the modified REAP-S scores against the extreme HEI-2005 scores, precision increased to 81%. It appears the REAP-S is an acceptable tool to rapidly assess diet quality. It has a significant, moderate correlation to both the HEI-2005 and the DQI-R, with strong precision as well. Both correlation and precision is strengthened when values are compared to only the extreme scores of the HEI-2005; however, more research studies are needed to evaluate the validity of REAP-S in a more diverse population and to evaluate if changes to select questions can improve its accuracy in assessing diet quality.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Diet quality of omnivores, vegans and vegetarians as measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2010 and the Rapid Eating and Activity Assessment for Participants short version

Description

Diet quality is closely intertwined with overall health status and deserves close examination. Healthcare providers are stretched thin in the current stressed system and would benefit from a validated tool

Diet quality is closely intertwined with overall health status and deserves close examination. Healthcare providers are stretched thin in the current stressed system and would benefit from a validated tool for rapid assessment of diet quality. The Rapid Eating and Activity Assessment for Participants Short Version (REAP-S) represents one such option. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the REAP-S and Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010) for scoring the diet quality of omnivorous, vegetarian and vegan diets. Eighty-one healthy male and female subjects with an average age of 30.9 years completed the REAP-S as well as a 24-hour dietary recall. REAP-S and HEI-2010 scores were calculated for each subject and evaluated against each other using Spearman correlations and Chi Square. Further analysis was completed to compare diet quality scores of the HEI-2010 and REAP-S by tertiles to examine how closely these two tools score diet quality. The mean HEI-2010 score was 47.4/100 and the mean REAP-S score was 33.5/39. The correlation coefficient comparing the REAP-S to the HEI-2010 was 0.309 (p=0.005), and the REAP-S exhibited a precision of 44.4% to the HEI-2010 for diet quality. The REAP-S significantly correlated with the HEI-2010 for whole fruit (r=0.247, p=0.026), greens and beans (r=0.276, p=0.013), seafood proteins (r=0.298, p=0.007), and fatty acids (r=0.400, p<0.001). When evaluated by diet type, the REAP-S proved to have increased precision in plant-based diets, 50% for vegetarian and 52% for vegan, over omnivorous diets (32%). The REAP-S is a desirable tool to rapidly assess diet quality in the community setting as it is significantly correlated to the HEI-2010 and requires less time, labor and money to score and assess than the HEI-2010. More studies are needed to evaluate the precision and validity of REAP-S in a broader, more diverse population.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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A novel "Food Lists" app to promote weight loss, improve diet quality, and strengthen diet adherence: the Foodmindr study

Description

Background: Smartphone diet tracking applications (apps) are increasing in popularity but may not adequately address the important concerns of proper intake and of diet quality. Two novel weight loss

Background: Smartphone diet tracking applications (apps) are increasing in popularity but may not adequately address the important concerns of proper intake and of diet quality. Two novel weight loss apps were designed based on the popular dietary frameworks: MyPlate and FoodLists. MyPlate, the dietary guidelines put forth by the U.S. government, encourages a balanced diet from five primary food groups, but does not specify intake limits. The Food Lists set upper intake limits on all food groups except vegetables, and these guidelines extend to include fats, sweets, and alcohol.

Objective: The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to determine whether adherence to a weight loss app providing intake limits and more food group detail (the Food Lists app) facilitated more weight loss and better diet quality than adherence to a weight loss app based on the MyPlate platform. An additional objective was to examine whether higher app adherence would lead to greater weight loss.

Design: Thirty seven adults from a campus population were recruited, randomized, and instructed to follow either the Food Lists app (N=20) or the MyPlate app (N=17) for eight weeks. Subjects received one 15 minute session of diet and app training at baseline, and their use of the app was tracked daily. Body mass was measured at baseline and post-test.

Participants/setting: Healthy adults from a university campus population in downtown Phoenix, Arizona with BMI 24 to 40, medically stable, and who owned a smartphone.

Main outcome measures: Outcome measures included weight change, days of adherence, and diet quality change. Secondary measures included BMI, fat %, and waist circumference.

Statistical analysis: Descriptive statistics (means and standard errors); Repeated measures ANOVAs analyzing weight, diet quality, and BMI; Pearson and Spearman correlations analyzing adherence and weight loss.

Results: Repeated measures ANOVAs and correlations revealed no significant mean differences in primary outcome variables of weight loss, adherence, or diet quality (P=0.140; P=0.790; P=0.278). However, there was a significant mean reduction of BMI favoring the group using the Food Lists app (P=0.041).

Conclusion: The findings strengthen the idea that intake limits and food group detail may be associated with weight loss. Further investigation is warranted to determine whether longer use of the Food Lists app can produce more significant dieting successes and encourage healthier behavioral outcomes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016