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Space Radiation Effects in Conductive Bridging Random Access Memory

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This work investigates the effects of ionizing radiation and displacement damage on the retention of state, DC programming, and neuromorphic pulsed programming of Ag-Ge30Se70 conductive bridging random access memory (CBRAM)

This work investigates the effects of ionizing radiation and displacement damage on the retention of state, DC programming, and neuromorphic pulsed programming of Ag-Ge30Se70 conductive bridging random access memory (CBRAM) devices. The results show that CBRAM devices are susceptible to both environments. An observable degradation in electrical response due to total ionizing dose (TID) is shown during neuromorphic pulsed programming at TID below 1 Mrad using Cobalt-60. DC cycling in a 14 MeV neutron environment showed a collapse of the high resistance state (HRS) and low resistance state (LRS) programming window after a fluence of 4.9x10^{12} n/cm^2, demonstrating the CBRAM can fail in a displacement damage environment. Heavy ion exposure during retention testing and DC cycling, showed that failures to programming occurred at approximately the same threshold, indicating that the failure mechanism for the two types of tests may be the same. The dose received due to ionizing electronic interactions and non-ionizing kinetic interactions, was calculated for each ion species at the fluence of failure. TID values appear to be the most correlated, indicating that TID effects may be the dominate failure mechanism in a combined environment, though it is currently unclear as to how the displacement damage also contributes to the response. An analysis of material effects due to TID has indicated that radiation damage can limit the migration of Ag+ ions. The reduction in ion current density can explain several of the effects observed in CBRAM while in the LRS.

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  • 2018

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Defect Induced Aging and Breakdown in High-k Dielectrics

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High-k dielectrics have been employed in the metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) since 45 nm technology node. In this MOSFET industry, Moore’s law projects the feature size of MOSFET

High-k dielectrics have been employed in the metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) since 45 nm technology node. In this MOSFET industry, Moore’s law projects the feature size of MOSFET scales half within every 18 months. Such scaling down theory has not only led to the physical limit of manufacturing but also raised the reliability issues in MOSFETs. After the incorporation of HfO2 based high-k dielectrics, the stacked oxides based gate insulator is facing rather challenging reliability issues due to the vulnerable HfO2 layer, ultra-thin interfacial SiO2 layer, and even messy interface between SiO2 and HfO2. Bias temperature instabilities (BTI), hot channel electrons injections (HCI), stress-induced leakage current (SILC), and time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) are the four most prominent reliability challenges impacting the lifetime of the chips under use.

In order to fully understand the origins that could potentially challenge the reliability of the MOSFETs the defects induced aging and breakdown of the high-k dielectrics have been profoundly investigated here. BTI aging has been investigated to be related to charging effects from the bulk oxide traps and generations of Si-H bonds related interface traps. CVS and RVS induced dielectric breakdown studies have been performed and investigated. The breakdown process is regarded to be related to oxygen vacancies generations triggered by hot hole injections from anode. Post breakdown conduction study in the RRAM devices have shown irreversible characteristics of the dielectrics, although the resistance could be switched into high resistance state.

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  • 2018

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Programmable metallization cell devices for flexible electronics

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Programmable metallization cell (PMC) technology is based on an electrochemical phenomenon in which a metallic electrodeposit can be grown or dissolved between two electrodes depending on the voltage applied between

Programmable metallization cell (PMC) technology is based on an electrochemical phenomenon in which a metallic electrodeposit can be grown or dissolved between two electrodes depending on the voltage applied between them. Devices based on this phenomenon exhibit a unique, self-healing property, as a broken metallic structure can be healed by applying an appropriate voltage between the two broken ends. This work explores methods of fabricating interconnects and switches based on PMC technology on flexible substrates. The objective was the evaluation of the feasibility of using this technology in flexible electronics applications in which reliability is a primary concern. The re-healable property of the interconnect is characterized for the silver doped germanium selenide (Ag-Ge-Se) solid electrolyte system. This property was evaluated by measuring the resistances of the healed interconnect structures and comparing these to the resistances of the unbroken structures. The reliability of the interconnects in both unbroken and healed states is studied by investigating the resistances of the structures to DC voltages, AC voltages and different temperatures as a function of time. This work also explores replacing silver with copper for these interconnects to enhance their reliability. A model for PMC-based switches on flexible substrates is proposed and compared to the observed device behavior with the objective of developing a formal design methodology for these devices. The switches were subjected to voltage sweeps and their resistance was investigated as a function of sweep voltage. The resistance of the switches as a function of voltage pulse magnitude when placed in series with a resistance was also investigated. A model was then developed to explain the behavior of these devices. All observations were based on statistical measurements to account for random errors. The results of this work demonstrate that solid electrolyte based interconnects display self-healing capability, which depends on the applied healing voltage and the current limit. However, they fail at lower current densities than metal interconnects due to an ion-drift induced failure mechanism. The results on the PMC based switches demonstrate that a model comprising a Schottky diode in parallel with a variable resistor predicts the behavior of the device.

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  • 2011