Matching Items (7)

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Multiscale reduced order models for the geometrically nonlinear response of complex structures

Description

The focus of this investigation includes three aspects. First, the development of nonlinear reduced order modeling techniques for the prediction of the response of complex structures exhibiting "large" deformations, i.e.

The focus of this investigation includes three aspects. First, the development of nonlinear reduced order modeling techniques for the prediction of the response of complex structures exhibiting "large" deformations, i.e. a geometrically nonlinear behavior, and modeled within a commercial finite element code. The present investigation builds on a general methodology, successfully validated in recent years on simpler panel structures, by developing a novel identification strategy of the reduced order model parameters, that enables the consideration of the large number of modes needed for complex structures, and by extending an automatic strategy for the selection of the basis functions used to represent accurately the displacement field. These novel developments are successfully validated on the nonlinear static and dynamic responses of a 9-bay panel structure modeled within Nastran. In addition, a multi-scale approach based on Component Mode Synthesis methods is explored. Second, an assessment of the predictive capabilities of nonlinear reduced order models for the prediction of the large displacement and stress fields of panels that have a geometric discontinuity; a flat panel with a notch was used for this assessment. It is demonstrated that the reduced order models of both virgin and notched panels provide a close match of the displacement field obtained from full finite element analyses of the notched panel for moderately large static and dynamic responses. In regards to stresses, it is found that the notched panel reduced order model leads to a close prediction of the stress distribution obtained on the notched panel as computed by the finite element model. Two enrichment techniques, based on superposition of the notch effects on the virgin panel stress field, are proposed to permit a close prediction of the stress distribution of the notched panel from the reduced order model of the virgin one. A very good prediction of the full finite element results is achieved with both enrichments for static and dynamic responses. Finally, computational challenges associated with the solution of the reduced order model equations are discussed. Two alternatives to reduce the computational time for the solution of these problems are explored.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Reduced order modeling with variable spatial fidelity for the linear and nonlinear dynamics of multi-bay structures

Description

This investigation develops small-size reduced order models (ROMs) that provide an accurate prediction of the response of only part of a structure, referred to as component-centric ROMs. Four strategies to

This investigation develops small-size reduced order models (ROMs) that provide an accurate prediction of the response of only part of a structure, referred to as component-centric ROMs. Four strategies to construct such ROMs are presented, the first two of which are based on the Craig-Bampton Method and start with a set of modes for the component of interest (the β component). The response in the rest of the structure (the α component) induced by these modes is then determined and optimally represented by applying a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition strategy using Singular Value Decomposition. These first two methods are effectively basis reductions techniques of the CB basis. An approach based on the “Global - Local” Method generates the “global” modes by “averaging” the mass property over α and β comp., respectively (to extract a “coarse” model of α and β) and the “local” modes orthogonal to the “global” modes to add back necessary “information” for β. The last approach adopts as basis for the entire structure its linear modes which are dominant in the β component response. Then, the contributions of other modes in this part of the structure are approximated in terms of those of the dominant modes with close natural frequencies and similar mode shapes in the β component. In this manner, the non-dominant modal contributions are “lumped” onto the dominant ones, to reduce the number of modes for a prescribed accuracy. The four approaches are critically assessed on the structural finite element model of a 9-bay panel with the modal lumping-based method leading to the smallest sized ROMs. Therefore, it is extended to the nonlinear geometric situation and first recast as a rotation of the modal basis to achieve unobservable modes. In the linear case, these modes completely disappear from the formulation owing to orthogonality. In the nonlinear case, however, the generalized coordinates of these modes are still present in the nonlinear terms of the observable modes. A closure-type algorithm is then proposed to eliminate the unobserved generalized coordinates. This approach, its accuracy and computational savings, was demonstrated on a simple beam model and the 9-bay panel model.

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Date Created
  • 2017

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Distinct feature learning and nonlinear variation pattern discovery using regularized autoencoders

Description

Feature learning and the discovery of nonlinear variation patterns in high-dimensional data is an important task in many problem domains, such as imaging, streaming data from sensors, and manufacturing. This

Feature learning and the discovery of nonlinear variation patterns in high-dimensional data is an important task in many problem domains, such as imaging, streaming data from sensors, and manufacturing. This dissertation presents several methods for learning and visualizing nonlinear variation in high-dimensional data. First, an automated method for discovering nonlinear variation patterns using deep learning autoencoders is proposed. The approach provides a functional mapping from a low-dimensional representation to the original spatially-dense data that is both interpretable and efficient with respect to preserving information. Experimental results indicate that deep learning autoencoders outperform manifold learning and principal component analysis in reproducing the original data from the learned variation sources.

A key issue in using autoencoders for nonlinear variation pattern discovery is to encourage the learning of solutions where each feature represents a unique variation source, which we define as distinct features. This problem of learning distinct features is also referred to as disentangling factors of variation in the representation learning literature. The remainder of this dissertation highlights and provides solutions for this important problem.

An alternating autoencoder training method is presented and a new measure motivated by orthogonal loadings in linear models is proposed to quantify feature distinctness in the nonlinear models. Simulated point cloud data and handwritten digit images illustrate that standard training methods for autoencoders consistently mix the true variation sources in the learned low-dimensional representation, whereas the alternating method produces solutions with more distinct patterns.

Finally, a new regularization method for learning distinct nonlinear features using autoencoders is proposed. Motivated in-part by the properties of linear solutions, a series of learning constraints are implemented via regularization penalties during stochastic gradient descent training. These include the orthogonality of tangent vectors to the manifold, the correlation between learned features, and the distributions of the learned features. This regularized learning approach yields low-dimensional representations which can be better interpreted and used to identify the true sources of variation impacting a high-dimensional feature space. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method for nonlinear variation pattern discovery on both simulated and real data sets.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Basins of attraction in human balance

Description

According to the CDC in 2010, there were 2.8 million emergency room visits costing $7.9 billion dollars for treatment of nonfatal falling injuries in emergency departments across the country. Falls

According to the CDC in 2010, there were 2.8 million emergency room visits costing $7.9 billion dollars for treatment of nonfatal falling injuries in emergency departments across the country. Falls are a recognized risk factor for unintentional injuries among older adults, accounting for a large proportion of fractures, emergency department visits, and urgent hospitalizations. The objective of this research was to identify and learn more about what factors affect balance using analysis techniques from nonlinear dynamics. Human balance and gait research traditionally uses linear or qualitative tests to assess and describe human motion; however, it is growing more apparent that human motion is neither a simple nor a linear task. In the 1990s Collins, first started applying stochastic processes to analyze human postural control system. Recently, Zakynthinaki et al. modeled human balance using the idea that humans will remain erect when perturbed until some boundary, or physical limit, is passed. This boundary is similar to the notion of basins of attraction in nonlinear dynamics and is referred to as the basin of stability. Human balance data was collected using dual force plates and Vicon marker position data for leans using only ankle movements and leans that were unrestricted. With this dataset, Zakynthinaki’s work was extended by comparing different algorithms used to create the critical curve (basin of stability boundary) that encloses the experimental data points as well as comparing the differences between the two leaning conditions.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Three essays on shrinkage estimation and model selection of linear and nonlinear time series models

Description

The primary objective in time series analysis is forecasting. Raw data often exhibits nonstationary behavior: trends, seasonal cycles, and heteroskedasticity. After data is transformed to a weakly stationary process,

The primary objective in time series analysis is forecasting. Raw data often exhibits nonstationary behavior: trends, seasonal cycles, and heteroskedasticity. After data is transformed to a weakly stationary process, autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models may capture the remaining temporal dynamics to improve forecasting. Estimation of ARMA can be performed through regressing current values on previous realizations and proxy innovations. The classic paradigm fails when dynamics are nonlinear; in this case, parametric, regime-switching specifications model changes in level, ARMA dynamics, and volatility, using a finite number of latent states. If the states can be identified using past endogenous or exogenous information, a threshold autoregressive (TAR) or logistic smooth transition autoregressive (LSTAR) model may simplify complex nonlinear associations to conditional weakly stationary processes. For ARMA, TAR, and STAR, order parameters quantify the extent past information is associated with the future. Unfortunately, even if model orders are known a priori, the possibility of over-fitting can lead to sub-optimal forecasting performance. By intentionally overestimating these orders, a linear representation of the full model is exploited and Bayesian regularization can be used to achieve sparsity. Global-local shrinkage priors for AR, MA, and exogenous coefficients are adopted to pull posterior means toward 0 without over-shrinking relevant effects. This dissertation introduces, evaluates, and compares Bayesian techniques that automatically perform model selection and coefficient estimation of ARMA, TAR, and STAR models. Multiple Monte Carlo experiments illustrate the accuracy of these methods in finding the "true" data generating process. Practical applications demonstrate their efficacy in forecasting.

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Date Created
  • 2018

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Nonlinear dynamics of uncertain multi-joint structures

Description

The present investigation is part of a long-term effort focused on the development of a methodology for the computationally efficient prediction of the dynamic response of structures with multiple joints.

The present investigation is part of a long-term effort focused on the development of a methodology for the computationally efficient prediction of the dynamic response of structures with multiple joints. The first part of this thesis reports on the dynamic response of nominally identical beams with a single lap joint (“Brake-Reuss” beam). The observed impact responses at different levels clearly demonstrate the occurrence of both micro- and macro-slip, which are reflected by increased damping and a lowering of natural frequencies. Significant beam-to-beam variability of impact responses is also observed.

Based on these experimental results, a deterministic 4-parameter Iwan model of the joint was developed. These parameters were randomized following a previous investigation. The randomness in the impact response predicted from this uncertain model was assessed in a Monte Carlo format through a series of time integrations of the response and found to be consistent with the experimental results.

The availability of an uncertain computational model for the Brake-Reuss beam provides a starting point to analyze and model the response of multi-joint structures in the presence of uncertainty/variability. To this end, a 4-beam frame was designed that is composed of three identical Brake-Reuss beams and a fourth, stretched one. The response of that structure to impact was computed and several cases were identified.

The presence of uncertainty implies that an exact prediction of the response of a particular frame cannot be achieved. Rather, the response can only be predicted to lie within a band reflecting the level of uncertainty. In this perspective, the computational model adopted for the frame is only required to provide a good estimate of this uncertainty band. Equivalently, a relaxation of the model complexity, i.e., the introduction of epistemic uncertainty, can be performed as long as it does not affect significantly the uncertainty band of the predictions. Such an approach, which holds significant promise for the efficient computational of the response of structures with many uncertain joints, is assessed here by replacing some joints by linear spring elements. It is found that this simplification of the model is often acceptable at lower excitation/response levels.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Reduced order modeling for the nonlinear geometric response of a curved beam

Description

The focus of this investigation is on the renewed assessment of nonlinear reduced order models (ROM) for the accurate prediction of the geometrically nonlinear response of a curved beam. In

The focus of this investigation is on the renewed assessment of nonlinear reduced order models (ROM) for the accurate prediction of the geometrically nonlinear response of a curved beam. In light of difficulties encountered in an earlier modeling effort, the various steps involved in the construction of the reduced order model are carefully reassessed. The selection of the basis functions is first addressed by comparison with the results of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis. The normal basis functions suggested earlier, i.e. the transverse linear modes of the corresponding flat beam, are shown in fact to be very close to the POD eigenvectors of the normal displacements and thus retained in the present effort. A strong connection is similarly established between the POD eigenvectors of the tangential displacements and the dual modes which are accordingly selected to complement the normal basis functions. The identification of the parameters of the reduced order model is revisited next and it is observed that the standard approach for their identification does not capture well the occurrence of snap-throughs. On this basis, a revised approach is proposed which is assessed first on the static, symmetric response of the beam to a uniform load. A very good to excellent matching between full finite element and ROM predicted responses validates the new identification procedure and motivates its application to the dynamic response of the beam which exhibits both symmetric and antisymmetric motions. While not quite as accurate as in the static case, the reduced order model predictions match well their full Nastran counterparts and support the reduced order model development strategy.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011