Matching Items (2)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

151644-Thumbnail Image.png

Divorce access attitudes in America: exploring structure and values for a new theoretical framework

Description

This thesis builds upon previous research exploring the different factors that influence divorce access attitudes, using data drawn from the General Social Survey in 1991, 1994, and 2008. I examine different social values and economic characteristics and their influence on

This thesis builds upon previous research exploring the different factors that influence divorce access attitudes, using data drawn from the General Social Survey in 1991, 1994, and 2008. I examine different social values and economic characteristics and their influence on divorce access attitudes, and explore gender differences within these factors. I examine how information drawn from this analysis supports the argument for Second Demographic Transition Theory as a theoretical framework to explain influential factors in the formation of divorce access attitudes. I conclude that social values variables related to attitudes towards sex behaviors remain significant predictors of divorce access attitudes. I also recognize that socioeconomic context bears influence on the formation of divorce access attitudes. Gender differences lead to the conclusion that behavior and interactions around divorce access attitude formation are dynamic and complex, but are effectively explained using Second Demographic Transition Theory.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013

150011-Thumbnail Image.png

Return migration: modes of incorporation for mixed nativity households in Mexico

Description

United States and Mexico population statistics show clear evidence of return migration. This study uses qualitative data collected in a municipality in the State of Mexico during the summer of 2010 from families comprised of Mexican nationals and United States-born

United States and Mexico population statistics show clear evidence of return migration. This study uses qualitative data collected in a municipality in the State of Mexico during the summer of 2010 from families comprised of Mexican nationals and United States-born children post-relocation to Mexico. Using Portes and Zhou's theoretical framework on modes of incorporation, this study illustrates the government policy, societal reception and coethnic community challenges the first and second generation face in their cases of family return migration. This study finds that the municipal government is indifferent to foreign children and their incorporation in Mexico schools. Furthermore, extended family and community, may not always aid the household's adaptation to Mexico. Despite the lack of a coethnic community, parents eventually acclimate into manual and entrepreneurial positions in society and the children contend to find a place called home.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011