Matching Items (3)

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Technology Integration with Teacher Educators

Description

Preservice teachers are faced with many challenges as they enter their first year of teaching. This is particularly true when dealing with future-ready skills, such as technology integration in

Preservice teachers are faced with many challenges as they enter their first year of teaching. This is particularly true when dealing with future-ready skills, such as technology integration in K-12 classrooms, an area where many higher education or teaching faculty may not feel comfortable or fluent enough to support preservice teachers or to model in their own instruction.

This action research study aimed to understand how faculty develop Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) in ways that will help them to enhance their instruction and model technology integration for preservice teachers. An online community was created that allowed teacher educators to interact synchronously or asynchronously to collaborate, learn, and practice new technological skills. This community served as a place for teacher educators to play with new technology and to share their ideas and practices with their peers—ideally to begin the process of developing the knowledge and fluency with technology that would allow them to better support teacher education students.

Both qualitative and quantitative data were used to explore faculty’s development of TPACK. A pre-survey, retrospective pre-survey, and post-survey were administered and analyzed. Also, interviews of participants and observations of the online community were used to collect qualitative data.

The results of the study showed an increase in participants’ confidence for selecting technologies to enhance their instruction after they participated in the online community. Also, the participants felt more confident using strategies that combine content, technologies, and teaching approaches in their classrooms or other learning environments.

In Chapter 5, a discussion of the findings was presented, in which several main implications are shared for researchers who might be engaged in similar work. Also, the lessons learned from this action research are explained, as well as the limitations experienced in this study.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Teacher educator collaboration using portfolios: using peer and student feedback as a process for continuous reflection and learning

Description

This action research study examined the influence of teacher educator collaboration using portfolios. The participants in this study were teacher educators in a university. The study was designed to combat

This action research study examined the influence of teacher educator collaboration using portfolios. The participants in this study were teacher educators in a university. The study was designed to combat the limited ways in which teacher educators receive feedback on their teaching. Teacher educator collaboration using portfolios enabled teacher educators to engage in professional learning around the teacher educator pedagogy of rehearsal, receive feedback in multiple ways over one semester, and utilize the feedback to make changes in their instruction. Because the process was cyclical, the measures enabled them to set goals, apply new learning, and engage in continual reflection and growth. A qualitative methods study was employed to investigate: (a) how teacher educators engaged in the collaborative portfolio process, (b) ways in which they found value in the process, and (c) ways in which they made changes to their teaching as a result of the feedback. Data were collected through pre-and post-intervention interviews, observations, and peer triad feedback forms. The study design aligned with two theoretical frameworks: situated learning theory and adult learning theory. Participants filmed themselves teaching twice, administered two teacher candidate feedback surveys, collaborated with their peers to examine their teaching together, and applied the feedback they received in order to strengthen their teaching. Throughout the study and at the conclusion, teacher educators used feedback from their students and peers to reflect on their own practices as teacher educators. The results of this study indicated that the participants found value in the pedagogy of rehearsal, watching their peers teach, and receiving feedback from both their peers and students. The data also showed that the teacher educators made changes to their instruction. Lastly, the participants valued the time to collaborate with peers. Future research should include making modifications to the current collaborative portfolio process to involve evidence of teacher candidate learning, allowing teacher educators to investigate how their practices influence teacher candidate learning.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Situated hope: understanding teacher educators' notions of hope

Description

This study examines teacher educators' understandings of hope related to teacher education. The study provides a previously unforeseen perspective on teacher educators' hope or lack of hope, and gives

This study examines teacher educators' understandings of hope related to teacher education. The study provides a previously unforeseen perspective on teacher educators' hope or lack of hope, and gives insight into that hope's foundation and maintenance. I have designed and implemented a rigorous multi-method study, beginning with developing and conducting a nationwide on-line survey with 625 participants. From a pool of 326 participants expressing interest in participating in interviews, I interviewed 23 teacher educators selected from a randomized and purposive sample. Finally, 25 participants took part in a writing prompt sent in lieu of an interview. Findings reflect that teacher educators' "hope" is a construct, a mixture of abstract ideas, emotions, dispositions, attitudes, that is hard to conceptualize or measure, but appears to be a very relevant and influential and hope for teacher educators takes place on a continuum from bystander to actualizing. The results of this study serve as a way to encourage educators to be more explicit about hope and discourses about teaching. It raises awareness about "false senses" of hope, which arise from narratives of redemption, paving the way for a conception of hope grounded in a strong understanding of the multiplicities of teaching, and how things "are." This conception of hope has the potential to foster discussions and actions of what education can be, rather than dwelling in the rhetoric of what education is not. Further, this research has the potential to open up spaces to discuss both the importance of and how to begin to think about incorporating hope into curricula through critical pedagogy and pedagogies of hope.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011