Matching Items (40)
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This study is intended as a catalyst to inspire new ways of thinking by educators, school administrators, and museum educators. It is a study of six K-12 art teachers who have both the technology and the opportunity at their school campuses to use collaborative videoconferencing as part of their instruction

This study is intended as a catalyst to inspire new ways of thinking by educators, school administrators, and museum educators. It is a study of six K-12 art teachers who have both the technology and the opportunity at their school campuses to use collaborative videoconferencing as part of their instruction in multicultural art, linking their students to the resources of the Smithsonian Institute in Washington D.C. The art unit used for the purpose of this study was Latina/o art. Findings show the Smithsonian American Art Museum program to be of high quality and useful i students see the connection between identity of self and multicultural art.
ContributorsFosnight, Estelle (Author) / Erickson, Mary (Thesis advisor) / Stokrocki, Mary (Committee member) / Young, Bernard (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2013
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This qualitative case study of 12, eighteen to twenty-four-year-olds from seven countries provided insight into the learning practices on an art-centered, social media platform. The study addressed two guiding questions; (a) what art related skills, knowledge, and dispositions do community members acquire using a social media platform? (b), What new

This qualitative case study of 12, eighteen to twenty-four-year-olds from seven countries provided insight into the learning practices on an art-centered, social media platform. The study addressed two guiding questions; (a) what art related skills, knowledge, and dispositions do community members acquire using a social media platform? (b), What new literacy practices, e.g., the use of new technologies and an ethos of participation, collective intelligence, collaboration, dispersion of abundant resources, and sharing (Knobel & Lankshear, 2007), do members use in acquiring of art-related skills, concepts, knowledge, and dispositions? Data included interviews, online documents, artwork, screen capture of online content, threaded online discussions, and a questionnaire. Drawing on theory and research from both new literacies and art education, the study identified five practices related to learning in the visual arts: (a) practicing as professional artists; (b) engaging in discovery based search strategies for viewing and collecting member produced content; (c) learning by observational strategies; (d) giving constructive criticism and feedback; (e) making learning resources. The study presents suggestions for teachers interested in empowering instruction with new social media technologies.
ContributorsJones, Brian (Author) / Stokrocki, Mary (Thesis advisor) / Young, Bernard (Committee member) / Guzzetti, Barbara (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2012
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We live in a world of rapidly changing technologies that bathe us in visual images and information, not only challenging us to find connections and make sense of what we are learning, but also allowing us to learn and to collaborate in new ways. Art educators are using one of

We live in a world of rapidly changing technologies that bathe us in visual images and information, not only challenging us to find connections and make sense of what we are learning, but also allowing us to learn and to collaborate in new ways. Art educators are using one of these new technologies, virtual worlds, to create educational environments and curricula. This study looks at how post-secondary art educators are using Second Life in their undergraduate and graduate level curricula and what perceived benefits, challenges, and unique learning experiences they feel this new educational venue offers. This study uses qualitative and participant observation methodologies, including qualitative interviews, observations, and collection of generated works, to look at the practices of six art educators teaching university level undergraduate and graduate courses. Data are compared internally between the participants and externally by correlating to current research. Art education in Second Life includes many curricula activities and strategies often seen in face-to-face classes, including writing reflections, essays, and papers, creating presentations and Power Points, conducting research, and creating art. Challenges include expense, student frustration and anxiety issues, and the transience of Second Life sites. Among the unique learning experiences are increased opportunities for field trips, student collaboration, access to guest speakers, and the ability to set up experiences not practical or possible in the real world. The experiences of these six art educators can be used as a guide for art educators just beginning exploration of virtual world education and encouragement when looking for new ways to teach that may increase our students' understanding and knowledge and their access and connections to others.
ContributorsSchlegel, Deborah (Author) / Stokrocki, Mary (Thesis advisor) / Erickson, Mary (Committee member) / Young, Bernard (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2014
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ABSTRACT This qualitative study examines how high school art teachers conceive of being a good art teacher. Motivated by my own experiences as an art teacher, I designed this study to add teachers' voices to the conversation surrounding quality in education. My research design included a narrative strand and an

ABSTRACT This qualitative study examines how high school art teachers conceive of being a good art teacher. Motivated by my own experiences as an art teacher, I designed this study to add teachers' voices to the conversation surrounding quality in education. My research design included a narrative strand and an arts-based strand. In the narrative strand, I interviewed and observed 12 high school art educators from a major city in the southwest. I conducted an autoethnographic reflection exploring my connection to the research topic and research process. In the arts-based strand I used fiber-arts to further understand my topic. I wrote this dissertation using a narrative approach, blending the traditional research format, voices of participants, and my autoethnographic reflection. I included the results of my arts-based approach in the final chapter. Findings suggest that the teachers in this study conceptualize being a good art teacher as a process of identity construction. Each of the teachers understood what it meant to be a good art teacher in unique ways, connected to their personal experiences and backgrounds. As the teachers engaged in identity work to become the kind of art teacher they wanted to be, they engaged in a process of identity construction that consisted of four steps. I propose a model of identity construction in which the teachers chose teaching practices, evaluated those practices, identified challenges to their identities, and selected strategies to confirm, assert, or defend their desired identities. The findings have implications for teachers to become reflective practitioners; for teacher educators to prepare teachers to engage in reflective practices; and for administrators and policy makers to take into account the cyclical and personal nature of identity construction. This study also has implications for further research including the need to examine the dispositions of art teachers, teachers' evolving conceptions of what it means to be a good art teacher, and the effect labeling teachers' quality has on their identity construction.
ContributorsAndrelchik, Hillary (Author) / Erickson, Mary (Thesis advisor) / Young, Bernard (Committee member) / Margolis, Eric (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2014
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This study aimed to understand, compare and describe details about U.S children and Taiwanese children's visual image reading. The researcher interviewed thirty children ages 8 to 10 in the state of Arizona and Taiwan. The researcher employed quantitative and qualitative methods to analyze the data. The analysis using these two

This study aimed to understand, compare and describe details about U.S children and Taiwanese children's visual image reading. The researcher interviewed thirty children ages 8 to 10 in the state of Arizona and Taiwan. The researcher employed quantitative and qualitative methods to analyze the data. The analysis using these two methods provided different ways of comprehending the data. The results showed that the two groups of children's image reading did not have statistically significant differences in most categories; but there were demonstrable trends and viewpoints employed when both groups of children explained the details of the images. First, the children expressed what they saw in the images in six ways. The U.S. children were more able to describe contexts with self-experiences/opinions and/or associations than the Taiwanese children. Second, when interpreting the meanings, the Taiwanese children understood the concepts of the images better than the U.S. group. The U.S. children were more critical and expressed self-opinions/associations more. Third, when asked preferences, the U.S. children paid more attention to identify their favorites and express feeling the images brought to them. The Taiwanese children cared more about style and form. Fourth, when judging the images, the U.S. children emphasized the artist's devotion to creating while Taiwanese children considered the form, composition, colors, structure, design, and composition. The results also indicated that the children decided their preferences and their judgments of artworks might be based on multiple viewpoints instead of a single one, especially for the Taiwanese children. Some cultural differences between the two groups of children and their image readings were presented, such as, cultural differences made children have different learned symbolism.
ContributorsChiou, Yu-ting (Author) / Young, Bernard (Thesis advisor) / Margolis, Eric (Committee member) / Stokrocki, Mary (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2013
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Through the disciplines of art education, anthropology and psychology the researcher examined research-based traits and characteristics of the creative process among a second year Title 1 urban high school art class. Within the theoretical framework of social justice, this micro-ethnographic study explored exactly what teaching and learning to be creative

Through the disciplines of art education, anthropology and psychology the researcher examined research-based traits and characteristics of the creative process among a second year Title 1 urban high school art class. Within the theoretical framework of social justice, this micro-ethnographic study explored exactly what teaching and learning to be creative implies and proposes a potential resolution for art teachers learning how to enhance teaching children how to think creatively. The research proposition is that student creativity occurs as a function of a series of interrelated factors including a nurturing classroom context, strong teacher-student dialogue, strategic questioning, purposeful incorporation of visual culture, and manipulation of content in favor of student interests within the culturally situated context of the art classroom. Navigating teacher-student relationships at moments of creative origination produced results indicating that the art teacher alone is the single most influential factor for enhancing creative outcomes in a classroom. Through incorporation of a variety of collaborative activities and comparative analysis of dissimilar content-driven projects generated evidence that artistic skills and creativity do not necessarily go hand-in-hand. The study finds that the artworks produced evidence based nuances of the creative traits of originality, fluency, flexibility, and elaboration in which profoundly varied in character depending on the content and the context. The study concludes that creativity cannot be strictly taught or learned, but rather that it can be enhanced through teacher nurturing and manipulation of content to encompass a socially intelligent uptake in the culture of art-making. Broader implications are suggested focusing on the significance of creative education and the impact it can have for educational systems, schools and undergraduate programs in art education. The researcher proposes an art education curriculum model that fosters both creative thinking and the unique learning needs of Title 1 urban students. The curriculum suggests the art teacher begin initial instruction by teaching students about the traits, characteristics and obstructions of creativity prior to teaching artistic skills sets to serve as a foundation of creative awareness from the start.
ContributorsForeman, Angela (Author) / Young, Bernard (Thesis advisor) / Stokrocki, Mary (Committee member) / Fischman, Gustavo (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2014
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Benefits and Challenges of Collaboration and Autonomy in a High School Beginning Art Class In the twenty-first century students are used to communicating. Using social media they often collaborate with peers. Despite this students may prefer to work independently rather than collaborating with fellow students in art class. Also, collaboration

Benefits and Challenges of Collaboration and Autonomy in a High School Beginning Art Class In the twenty-first century students are used to communicating. Using social media they often collaborate with peers. Despite this students may prefer to work independently rather than collaborating with fellow students in art class. Also, collaboration has become more common with twenty-first century artists. This study addresses the possible disconnect between the popular culture of today's art students' preference for the traditional independent autonomous practices in the art classroom, and the collaborative practice of many contemporary artists. The purpose of this study is to investigate how working collaboratively or working autonomously affects the artworks and oral and written responses about their artwork of high school beginning art students. I used a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods to gather data. Data for this study are the artworks made by the participants, idea starter sheets, participant written reflections, their oral answers to interview questions, and my observations of the classes. The participants in this study are students from four intact classrooms of high school beginning art. This study produced multiple findings, such as: The artworks revealed differences between collaborative classes and autonomous classes. Additionally, no differences were revealed from the written and oral responses made by the participants in the two classes. I conclude that, when given the opportunity to collaborate or work autonomously, high school beginning art students in this study made different artworks but made no different oral and written responses.
ContributorsBomberg-Roth, Patricia (Author) / Erickson, Mary (Thesis advisor) / Stokrocki, Mary (Committee member) / Young, Bernard (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2014
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The general field of interest of this study was art education in the context of art museums in the United States. The vehicle of a mixed method, descriptive research design was used to investigate whether museum educator and curator participants had tendencies to use personal or communal approaches (Barrett, 2000)

The general field of interest of this study was art education in the context of art museums in the United States. The vehicle of a mixed method, descriptive research design was used to investigate whether museum educator and curator participants had tendencies to use personal or communal approaches (Barrett, 2000) to teaching art interpretation to adult visitors. While the personal approach to art interpretation focused on individuals' responses to artworks, the communal approach emphasized the community of art scholars' shared understandings of artworks.

Understanding the communities of practice of the participants was integral to the discovery of meaning in the study's findings. Wenger (1998) introduced the theory of community of practice to explain how individuals, who are united in a particular context, shared similar perspectives, learned socially from each other, and gained a sense of identity through their routines and interactions. The study examined how museum educators' and curators' separate communities of practice influenced their members' teaching approaches through the development of distinct teacher personae. Teacher personae reflected the educational values and priorities of museum educators' and curators' communities of practice. And, teacher personae had tendencies to adopt personal or communal approaches to art interpretation.
ContributorsSchmitt, Rory (Author) / Erickson, Mary L (Thesis advisor) / Toon, Richard (Committee member) / Young, Bernard (Committee member) / Held, Peter (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2014
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In this action research, the need for high schools to embrace a pedagogical shift to teaching 21st century computer and online literacy skills is investigated. This study explored areas of secondary and higher education, technology usage, and online pedagogies, 21st century skill frameworks, and brain function as they pertain to

In this action research, the need for high schools to embrace a pedagogical shift to teaching 21st century computer and online literacy skills is investigated. This study explored areas of secondary and higher education, technology usage, and online pedagogies, 21st century skill frameworks, and brain function as they pertain to learning and decision-making, with the aim of comprehending the differing high school levels of preparedness for college in regards to 21st century skills. Through literature reviews, a research was designed to further explore the specific areas of a discovered gap in high school students' 21st century skills for college. Pre- and post-unit surveys, in combination with student assignment scores, were complied and examined to reveal a weakness in academic habits and computer literacy skills associated with 21st century learning. The study results support literature review findings of a breach between high school 21st century skill levels and collegiate level necessities. With these findings, it is suggested that instructors become choice architects, giving them the unique ability to nudge high school policy makers and students towards identifying the gaps between the analog and digital worlds of academia, generating more successful students as they transition to university online courses.
ContributorsHorn, Timothy (Author) / Patel, Mookesh (Thesis advisor) / Giard, Jacques (Committee member) / Marsh, Josephine (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2015
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Description
In contemporary society, educators teach adolescent students about the importance of developmental growth. This growth transitions into leadership, which prepares youth to collaborate with adults in a working environment. Additionally, youth mural programs generate leadership skills, yet not many art educators are using mural projects as a means to develo

In contemporary society, educators teach adolescent students about the importance of developmental growth. This growth transitions into leadership, which prepares youth to collaborate with adults in a working environment. Additionally, youth mural programs generate leadership skills, yet not many art educators are using mural projects as a means to develop leadership in their students. This study explored the connection between working collaboratively on a mural project and the impact it had on leadership traits and skills in adolescent girls. I created an action research project in conjunction with Girl Scouts to encourage a group of girls while creating a mural. The mural project took place at an Arizona Girl Scout resident camp for a total of 11 days. Seven participants between the ages of 14-17 engaged in planning and executing a tile mosaic mural. The image they created remains as a permanent mural for the camp. Qualitative data includes responses to reflection questions and observations. Quantitative data consist of self-reported questionnaire scores before and after the mural project. The data is analyzed to understand if there was a difference in leadership traits and skills before and after instruction. Data is also used to see which leadership traits and/ or skills, if any, were impacted. Findings in the study reveal differences in leadership skills before and after instruction. However, there was not a significant impact to leadership traits. Specific skills that improved include those that involve communication and working with others. I conclude that adolescent girls became more aware of communicating effectively, adapting ideas to others, and working with others after they finished the mural. Additionally participants were more open to sharing thoughts near the end of the project than at the start.
ContributorsMarcinko, Aimee (Author) / Erickson, Mary (Thesis advisor) / Stokrocki, Mary (Committee member) / Young, Bernard (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2014