Matching Items (6)

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An airline pilot attitude evaluation: transportation security administration's federal flight deck officer program

Description

The Federal Flight Deck Officer (FFDO) program was mandated legislatively, as part of the Homeland Security Act of 2002. This study replicated earlier research that investigated pilots’ opinions of the

The Federal Flight Deck Officer (FFDO) program was mandated legislatively, as part of the Homeland Security Act of 2002. This study replicated earlier research that investigated pilots’ opinions of the current state of the FFDO program based on interviews. A Likert survey was created to allow simpler quantitative collection and analysis of opinions from large groups of pilots. A total of 43 airline pilots participated in this study. Responses to the Likert questions were compared with demographics, searching for significance through a Pearson chi-square test and frequencies were compared to earlier research findings. Significant chi-square results showed that those familiar with the program were more likely to agree the program should continue, it was effective, the screening and selection process of program applicants was adequate and the Federal Air Marshal Service’s management of the FFDO program was effective. Those with Military experience were more likely to disagree it was reasonable that FFDOs were required to pay for their own room and board during training or train on their own time. All those who shared an opinion agreed there should be a suggestion medium between FFDOs and their management. Unlike the prior study, all those familiar with the program agreed the weapons transportation and carriage procedures were adequate. Furthermore, all those who shared an opinion found the holster locking mechanism adequate, which was another reversal of opinion from the prior study. Similar to the prior study, pilots unanimously agree FFDOs were well trained and agreed that the program was effective and should continue.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Rates of depression, anxiety, and stress in collegiate aviators

Description

The purpose of this research was to determine if students who are enrolled in a professional flight program exhibit significantly higher rates of depression, stress, and anxiety. This study compared

The purpose of this research was to determine if students who are enrolled in a professional flight program exhibit significantly higher rates of depression, stress, and anxiety. This study compared professional flight students to non-professional flight students to determine whether professional flight students have higher rates of depression and anxiety. In addition, this study sought to determine if there were higher depression, anxiety, and stress levels in upperclassmen (juniors and seniors) than in lowerclassmen (freshman and sophomore). Finally, upperclassmen and underclassmen within professional flight programs were compared to test if upperclassmen professional flight students exhibit higher rates for depression, anxiety and stress. These groups were compared to each other by using a survey that measures depression, anxiety, and stress. There were no statistically significant results. No singular group is more or less prone to depression, anxiety, or stress.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Training in a modern age

Description

This study was undertaken to ascertain to what degree, if any, virtual reality training was superior to monitor based training. By analyzing the results in a 2x3 ANOVA it was

This study was undertaken to ascertain to what degree, if any, virtual reality training was superior to monitor based training. By analyzing the results in a 2x3 ANOVA it was found that little difference in training resulted from using virtual reality or monitor interaction to facilitate training. The data did suggest that training involving rich textured environments might be more beneficial under virtual reality conditions, however nothing significant was found in the analysis. It might be possible that significance could be obtained by comparing a virtual reality set-up with higher fidelity to a monitor trial.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Hypoxia: an analysis of hypobaric chamber training

Description

Hypoxic hypoxia is a physiological condition which can manifest as a result of reduced barometric pressure, resulting in an insufficient amount of oxygen for use by the tissues in the

Hypoxic hypoxia is a physiological condition which can manifest as a result of reduced barometric pressure, resulting in an insufficient amount of oxygen for use by the tissues in the body. Hypoxic hypoxia is of concern to pilots due to dangerous impairment the condition can cause in-flight, such as short term memory loss, incoordination, or incapacitation. Several aircraft incidents and accidents have been attributed to hypoxia in the past ten years. To train for hypoxia recognition, high altitude chambers are used to induce hypoxia in participants, through a reduction of pressure inside a reinforced chamber. The training allows participants to experience their personal physiological symptoms of hypoxia in a controlled environment, in order to be trained in recognition and intervention techniques. This study surveyed 110 participants of high altitude chamber training to analyze perceptions, experience, and attitudes of respondents toward the training. Significant results were found; to include 99% of participants stating they would recommend the training to others, and 96.8% stating they felt they were a safer pilot, crewmember, or other support personnel due to attending high altitude chamber training. Two questions related to formal regulatory oversight revealed non-significant results. The purpose and results of this study are intended to support the improvement of aviation physiological training practices, in an effort to reduce hypoxia-related aircraft incidents an accidents in the future.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Generational differences in safety attitudes among commercial airline pilots

Description

The objective of this study was to investigate the generational differences among US commercial airline pilots regarding their attitudes toward safety. A survey was distributed to three different US airlines:

The objective of this study was to investigate the generational differences among US commercial airline pilots regarding their attitudes toward safety. A survey was distributed to three different US airlines: one major commercial airline, one regional airline, and one charter airline. A total of 106 pilots participated in this study. The pilots were categorized into three groups of generations based on birth years: Baby Boomers: 1946-1964, Generation X: 1965-1980, and Generation Y: 1981-2000. Through the use of one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), the results of the analyses found that there was no significant difference between the generations of pilots regarding safety attitudes. In the subcategory of self-confidence, the results indicated no significant differences between the different generations of pilots. However, in the subcategories of risk orientation and safety orientation, significant differences were detected among the three generations of pilots. Baby Boomers were found to have the lowest risk tolerance, while Generation Y had the highest. Conversely, Baby Boomers were found to have the highest safety orientation, with the lowest being that of Generation Y.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Engagement across the customer experience landscape: : the drivers of brand performance

Description

Understanding the customer experience, which requires a thorough knowledge of all touchpoints that can result from the way that a product is marketed, sold, and used has recently been identified

Understanding the customer experience, which requires a thorough knowledge of all touchpoints that can result from the way that a product is marketed, sold, and used has recently been identified as a research priority by the Marketing Science Institute. Although recent research has examined some aspects of the customer experience, research has yet to examine the way in which the full spectrum of touchpoint experiences may drive particular marketing performance metrics. Significant challenges to this line of research are the complex network of relationships that competing firms have forged with channel partners, the relationships that focal customers have with other customers in social networks and user communities, and the relationships that customers have with the brand and with channel partners. To address these challenges, this paper examined the customer experience and its effects on loyalty and commitment through three research projects conducted in the consumer aviation market. The first and second studies examined these touchpoint experiences using archival data supplied by an avionics manufacturer. Results from these studies showed the importance of the customer experience in accounting for customer loyalty. The final study examined the role of identity in shaping the customer experience among aircraft owners through a series of depth interviews. Results from these interviews illustrated the importance of identity in shaping the customer experience, and provided insights into how individuals attempt to use their consumption experiences to reinforce a sense of identity

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011