Matching Items (26)
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Description
Nonregular screening designs can be an economical alternative to traditional resolution IV 2^(k-p) fractional factorials. Recently 16-run nonregular designs, referred to as no-confounding designs, were introduced in the literature. These designs have the property that no pair of main effect (ME) and two-factor interaction (2FI) estimates are completely confounded. In

Nonregular screening designs can be an economical alternative to traditional resolution IV 2^(k-p) fractional factorials. Recently 16-run nonregular designs, referred to as no-confounding designs, were introduced in the literature. These designs have the property that no pair of main effect (ME) and two-factor interaction (2FI) estimates are completely confounded. In this dissertation, orthogonal arrays were evaluated with many popular design-ranking criteria in order to identify optimal 20-run and 24-run no-confounding designs. Monte Carlo simulation was used to empirically assess the model fitting effectiveness of the recommended no-confounding designs. The results of the simulation demonstrated that these new designs, particularly the 24-run designs, are successful at detecting active effects over 95% of the time given sufficient model effect sparsity. The final chapter presents a screening design selection methodology, based on decision trees, to aid in the selection of a screening design from a list of published options. The methodology determines which of a candidate set of screening designs has the lowest expected experimental cost.
ContributorsStone, Brian (Author) / Montgomery, Douglas C. (Thesis advisor) / Silvestrini, Rachel T. (Committee member) / Fowler, John W (Committee member) / Borror, Connie M. (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2013
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Description
Parallel Monte Carlo applications require the pseudorandom numbers used on each processor to be independent in a probabilistic sense. The TestU01 software package is the standard testing suite for detecting stream dependence and other properties that make certain pseudorandom generators ineffective in parallel (as well as serial) settings. TestU01 employs

Parallel Monte Carlo applications require the pseudorandom numbers used on each processor to be independent in a probabilistic sense. The TestU01 software package is the standard testing suite for detecting stream dependence and other properties that make certain pseudorandom generators ineffective in parallel (as well as serial) settings. TestU01 employs two basic schemes for testing parallel generated streams. The first applies serial tests to the individual streams and then tests the resulting P-values for uniformity. The second turns all the parallel generated streams into one long vector and then applies serial tests to the resulting concatenated stream. Various forms of stream dependence can be missed by each approach because neither one fully addresses the multivariate nature of the accumulated data when generators are run in parallel. This dissertation identifies these potential faults in the parallel testing methodologies of TestU01 and investigates two different methods to better detect inter-stream dependencies: correlation motivated multivariate tests and vector time series based tests. These methods have been implemented in an extension to TestU01 built in C++ and the unique aspects of this extension are discussed. A variety of different generation scenarios are then examined using the TestU01 suite in concert with the extension. This enhanced software package is found to better detect certain forms of inter-stream dependencies than the original TestU01 suites of tests.
ContributorsIsmay, Chester (Author) / Eubank, Randall (Thesis advisor) / Young, Dennis (Committee member) / Kao, Ming-Hung (Committee member) / Lanchier, Nicolas (Committee member) / Reiser, Mark R. (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2013
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Description
One dimensional (1D) and quasi-one dimensional quantum wires have been a subject of both theoretical and experimental interest since 1990s and before. Phenomena such as the "0.7 structure" in the conductance leave many open questions. In this dissertation, I study the properties and the internal electron states of semiconductor quantum

One dimensional (1D) and quasi-one dimensional quantum wires have been a subject of both theoretical and experimental interest since 1990s and before. Phenomena such as the "0.7 structure" in the conductance leave many open questions. In this dissertation, I study the properties and the internal electron states of semiconductor quantum wires with the path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) method. PIMC is a tool for simulating many-body quantum systems at finite temperature. Its ability to calculate thermodynamic properties and various correlation functions makes it an ideal tool in bridging experiments with theories. A general study of the features interpreted by the Luttinger liquid theory and observed in experiments is first presented, showing the need for new PIMC calculations in this field. I calculate the DC conductance at finite temperature for both noninteracting and interacting electrons. The quantized conductance is identified in PIMC simulations without making the same approximation in the Luttinger model. The low electron density regime is subject to strong interactions, since the kinetic energy decreases faster than the Coulomb interaction at low density. An electron state called the Wigner crystal has been proposed in this regime for quasi-1D wires. By using PIMC, I observe the zig-zag structure of the Wigner crystal. The quantum fluctuations suppress the long range correla- tions, making the order short-ranged. Spin correlations are calculated and used to evaluate the spin coupling strength in a zig-zag state. I also find that as the density increases, electrons undergo a structural phase transition to a dimer state, in which two electrons of opposite spins are coupled across the two rows of the zig-zag. A phase diagram is sketched for a range of densities and transverse confinements. The quantum point contact (QPC) is a typical realization of quantum wires. I study the QPC by explicitly simulating a system of electrons in and around a Timp potential (Timp, 1992). Localization of a single electron in the middle of the channel is observed at 5 K, as the split gate voltage increases. The DC conductance is calculated, which shows the effect of the Coulomb interaction. At 1 K and low electron density, a state similar to the Wigner crystal is found inside the channel.
ContributorsLiu, Jianheng, 1982- (Author) / Shumway, John B (Thesis advisor) / Schmidt, Kevin E (Committee member) / Chen, Tingyong (Committee member) / Yu, Hongbin (Committee member) / Ros, Robert (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2012
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Description
Monte Carlo methods often used in nuclear physics, such as auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo and Green's function Monte Carlo, have typically relied on phenomenological local real-space potentials containing as few derivatives as possible, such as the Argonne-Urbana family of interactions, to make sampling simple and efficient. Basis set methods

Monte Carlo methods often used in nuclear physics, such as auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo and Green's function Monte Carlo, have typically relied on phenomenological local real-space potentials containing as few derivatives as possible, such as the Argonne-Urbana family of interactions, to make sampling simple and efficient. Basis set methods such as no-core shell model or coupled-cluster techniques typically use softer non-local potentials because of their more rapid convergence with basis set size. These non-local potentials are typically defined in momentum space and are often based on effective field theory. Comparisons of the results of the two types of methods are complicated by the use of different potentials. This thesis discusses progress made in using such non-local potentials in quantum Monte Carlo calculations of light nuclei. In particular, it shows methods for evaluating the real-space, imaginary-time propagators needed to perform quantum Monte Carlo calculations using non-local potentials and universality properties of these propagators, how to formulate a good trial wave function for non-local potentials, and how to perform a "one-step" Green's function Monte Carlo calculation for non-local potentials.
ContributorsLynn, Joel E (Author) / Schmidt, Kevin E (Thesis advisor) / Alarcon, Ricardo (Committee member) / Lebed, Richard (Committee member) / Shovkovy, Igor (Committee member) / Shumway, John (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2013
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Description
The goal of this research work is to develop a particle-based device simulator for modeling strained silicon devices. Two separate modules had to be developed for that purpose: A generic bulk Monte Carlo simulation code which in the long-time limit solves the Boltzmann transport equation for electrons; and an extension

The goal of this research work is to develop a particle-based device simulator for modeling strained silicon devices. Two separate modules had to be developed for that purpose: A generic bulk Monte Carlo simulation code which in the long-time limit solves the Boltzmann transport equation for electrons; and an extension to this code that solves for the bulk properties of strained silicon. One scattering table is needed for conventional silicon, whereas, because of the strain breaking the symmetry of the system, three scattering tables are needed for modeling strained silicon material. Simulation results for the average drift velocity and the average electron energy are in close agreement with published data. A Monte Carlo device simulation tool has also been employed to integrate the effects of self-heating into device simulation for Silicon on Insulator devices. The effects of different types of materials for buried oxide layers have been studied. Sapphire, Aluminum Nitride (AlN), Silicon dioxide (SiO2) and Diamond have been used as target materials of interest in the analysis and the effects of varying insulator layer thickness have also been investigated. It was observed that although AlN exhibits the best isothermal behavior, diamond is the best choice when thermal effects are accounted for.
ContributorsQazi, Suleman (Author) / Vasileska, Dragica (Thesis advisor) / Goodnick, Stephen (Committee member) / Tao, Meng (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2013
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Description
This thesis presents a probabilistic evaluation of multiple laterally loaded drilled pier foundation design approaches using extensive data from a geotechnical investigation for a high voltage electric transmission line. A series of Monte Carlo simulations provide insight about the computed level of reliability considering site standard penetration test blow count

This thesis presents a probabilistic evaluation of multiple laterally loaded drilled pier foundation design approaches using extensive data from a geotechnical investigation for a high voltage electric transmission line. A series of Monte Carlo simulations provide insight about the computed level of reliability considering site standard penetration test blow count value variability alone (i.e., assuming all other aspects of the design problem do not contribute error or bias). Evaluated methods include Eurocode 7 Geotechnical Design procedures, the Federal Highway Administration drilled shaft LRFD design method, the Electric Power Research Institute transmission foundation design procedure and a site specific variability based approach previously suggested by the author of this thesis and others. The analysis method is defined by three phases: a) Evaluate the spatial variability of an existing subsurface database. b) Derive theoretical foundation designs from the database in accordance with the various design methods identified. c) Conduct Monti Carlo Simulations to compute the reliability of the theoretical foundation designs. Over several decades, reliability-based foundation design (RBD) methods have been developed and implemented to varying degrees for buildings, bridges, electric systems and other structures. In recent years, an effort has been made by researchers, professional societies and other standard-developing organizations to publish design guidelines, manuals and standards concerning RBD for foundations. Most of these approaches rely on statistical methods for quantifying load and resistance probability distribution functions with defined reliability levels. However, each varies with regard to the influence of site-specific variability on resistance. An examination of the influence of site-specific variability is required to provide direction for incorporating the concept into practical RBD design methods. Recent surveys of transmission line engineers by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) demonstrate RBD methods for the design of transmission line foundations have not been widely adopted. In the absence of a unifying design document with established reliability goals, transmission line foundations have historically performed very well, with relatively few failures. However, such a track record with no set reliability goals suggests, at least in some cases, a financial premium has likely been paid.
ContributorsHeim, Zackary (Author) / Houston, Sandra (Thesis advisor) / Witczak, Matthew (Committee member) / Kavazanjian, Edward (Committee member) / Zapata, Claudia (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2014
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Description
Dynamic channel selection in cognitive radio consists of two main phases. The first phase is spectrum sensing, during which the channels that are occupied by the primary users are detected. The second phase is channel selection, during which the state of the channel to be used by the secondary user

Dynamic channel selection in cognitive radio consists of two main phases. The first phase is spectrum sensing, during which the channels that are occupied by the primary users are detected. The second phase is channel selection, during which the state of the channel to be used by the secondary user is estimated. The existing cognitive radio channel selection literature assumes perfect spectrum sensing. However, this assumption becomes problematic as the noise in the channels increases, resulting in high probability of false alarm and high probability of missed detection. This thesis proposes a solution to this problem by incorporating the estimated state of channel occupancy into a selection cost function. The problem of optimal single-channel selection in cognitive radio is considered. A unique approach to the channel selection problem is proposed which consists of first using a particle filter to estimate the state of channel occupancy and then using the estimated state with a cost function to select a single channel for transmission. The selection cost function provides a means of assessing the various combinations of unoccupied channels in terms of desirability. By minimizing the expected selection cost function over all possible channel occupancy combinations, the optimal hypothesis which identifies the optimal single channel is obtained. Several variations of the proposed cost-based channel selection approach are discussed and simulated in a variety of environments, ranging from low to high number of primary user channels, low to high levels of signal-to-noise ratios, and low to high levels of primary user traffic.
ContributorsZapp, Joseph (Author) / Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia (Thesis advisor) / Kovvali, Narayan (Committee member) / Reisslein, Martin (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2014
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Description
Monte Carlo simulations are traditionally carried out for the determination of the amplification of forced vibration response of turbomachine/jet engine blades to mistuning. However, this effort can be computationally time consuming even when using the various reduced order modeling techniques. Accordingly, some investigations in the past have focused on obtaining

Monte Carlo simulations are traditionally carried out for the determination of the amplification of forced vibration response of turbomachine/jet engine blades to mistuning. However, this effort can be computationally time consuming even when using the various reduced order modeling techniques. Accordingly, some investigations in the past have focused on obtaining simple approximate estimates for this amplification. In particular, two of these have proposed the use of harmonic patterns of the blade properties around the disk as an approximate alternative to the many random patterns of Monte Carlo analyses. These investigations, while quite encouraging, have relied solely on single degree of freedom per sector models of the rotor.

In this light, the overall focus of the present effort is a revisit of harmonic

mistuning of rotors focusing first the confirmation of the previously obtained findings with a more detailed model of the blisk in both conditions of an isolated blade-dominated resonance and of a veering between blade and disk dominated modes. The latter condition cannot be simulated by a single degree of freedom per sector model. Further, the analysis will consider the distinct cases of mistuning due to variations of material properties (Young's modulus) and geometric properties (geometric mistuning). In the single degree of freedom model, both mistuning types are equivalent but they are not, as demonstrated here, in more realistic models. The difference arises because changes in geometry induce not only changes in natural frequencies of the blades alone but of their modes and the importance of these two sources of variability is discussed with both Monte Carlo simulation and harmonic mistuning results.

The present investigation focuses also on the possible extension of the harmonic mistuning concept and of its quantitative information that can be derived from such analyses. From it, a novel measure of blade-disk coupling is introduced and assessed in comparison with the coupling index introduced in the past. In conclusions, the low cost of harmonic mistuning computations in comparison with full Monte Carlo simulations is

demonstrated to be worthwhile to elucidate the basic behavior of the mistuned rotor in a random setting.
ContributorsSahoo, Saurav (Author) / Mignolet, Marc Paul (Thesis advisor) / Chattopadhyay, Aditi (Committee member) / Oswald, Jay (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2014
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Description
Spin-orbit interactions are important in determining nuclear structure. They lead to a shift in the energy levels in the nuclear shell model, which could explain the sequence of magic numbers in nuclei. Also in nucleon-nucleon scattering, the large nucleon polarization observed perpendicular to the plane of scattering needs to be

Spin-orbit interactions are important in determining nuclear structure. They lead to a shift in the energy levels in the nuclear shell model, which could explain the sequence of magic numbers in nuclei. Also in nucleon-nucleon scattering, the large nucleon polarization observed perpendicular to the plane of scattering needs to be explained by adding the spin-orbit interactions in the potential. Their effects change the equation of state and other properties of nuclear matter. Therefore, the simulation of spin-orbit interactions is necessary in nuclear matter.

The auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo is an effective and accurate method for calculating the ground state and low-lying exited states in nuclei and nuclear matter. It has successfully employed the Argonne v6' two-body potential to calculate the equation of state in nuclear matter, and has been applied to light nuclei with reasonable agreement with experimental results. However, the spin-orbit interactions were not included in the previous simulations, because the isospin-dependent spin-orbit potential is difficult in the quantum Monte Carlo method. This work develops a new method using extra auxiliary fields to break up the interactions between nucleons, so that the spin-orbit interaction with isospin can be included in the Hamiltonian, and ground-state energy and other properties can be obtained.
ContributorsZhang, Jie (Author) / Schmidt, Kevin E (Thesis advisor) / Alarcon, Ricardo (Committee member) / Lebed, Richard (Committee member) / Shumway, John (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2014
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Description
he accurate simulation of many-body quantum systems is a challenge for computational physics. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are a class of algorithms that can be used to solve the many-body problem. I study many-body quantum systems with Path Integral Monte Carlo techniques in three related areas of semiconductor physics: (1)

he accurate simulation of many-body quantum systems is a challenge for computational physics. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are a class of algorithms that can be used to solve the many-body problem. I study many-body quantum systems with Path Integral Monte Carlo techniques in three related areas of semiconductor physics: (1) the role of correlation in exchange coupling of spins in double quantum dots, (2) the degree of correlation and hyperpolarizability in Stark shifts in InGaAs/GaAs dots, and (3) van der Waals interactions between 1-D metallic quantum wires at finite temperature. The two-site model is one of the simplest quantum problems, yet the quantitative mapping from a three-dimensional model of a quantum double dot to an effective two-site model has many subtleties requiring careful treatment of exchange and correlation. I calculate exchange coupling of a pair of spins in a double dot from the permutations in a bosonic path integral, using Monte Carlo method. I also map this problem to a Hubbard model and find that exchange and correlation renormalizes the model parameters, dramatically decreasing the effective on-site repulsion at larger separations. Next, I investigated the energy, dipole moment, polarizability and hyperpolarizability of excitonic system in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots of different shapes and successfully give the photoluminescence spectra for different dots with electric fields in both the growth and transverse direction. I also showed that my method can deal with the higher-order hyperpolarizability, which is most relevant for fields directed in the lateral direction of large dots. Finally, I show how van der Waals interactions between two metallic quantum wires change with respect to the distance between them. Comparing the results from quantum Monte Carlo and the random phase approximation, I find similar power law dependance. My results for the calculation in quasi-1D and exact 1D wires include the effect of temperature, which has not previously been studied.
ContributorsZhang, Lei (Author) / Shumway, John (Thesis advisor) / Schmidt, Kevin (Committee member) / Bennet, Peter (Committee member) / Menéndez, Jose (Committee member) / Drucker, Jeff (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2011