Matching Items (6)

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Static behavior of chalcogenide based programmable metallization cells

Description

Nonvolatile memory (NVM) technologies have been an integral part of electronic systems for the past 30 years. The ideal non-volatile memory have minimal physical size, energy usage, and cost while

Nonvolatile memory (NVM) technologies have been an integral part of electronic systems for the past 30 years. The ideal non-volatile memory have minimal physical size, energy usage, and cost while having maximal speed, capacity, retention time, and radiation hardness. A promising candidate for next-generation memory is ion-conducting bridging RAM which is referred to as programmable metallization cell (PMC), conductive bridge RAM (CBRAM), or electrochemical metallization memory (ECM), which is likely to surpass flash memory in all the ideal memory characteristics. A comprehensive physics-based model is needed to completely understand PMC operation and assist in design optimization.

To advance the PMC modeling effort, this thesis presents a precise physical model parameterizing materials associated with both ion-rich and ion-poor layers of the PMC's solid electrolyte, so that captures the static electrical behavior of the PMC in both its low-resistance on-state (LRS) and high resistance off-state (HRS). The experimental data is measured from a chalcogenide glass PMC designed and manufactured at ASU. The static on- and off-state resistance of a PMC device composed of a layered (Ag-rich/Ag-poor) Ge30Se70 ChG film is characterized and modeled using three dimensional simulation code written in Silvaco Atlas finite element analysis software. Calibrating the model to experimental data enables the extraction of device parameters such as material bandgaps, workfunctions, density of states, carrier mobilities, dielectric constants, and affinities.

The sensitivity of our modeled PMC to the variation of its prominent achieved material parameters is examined on the HRS and LRS impedance behavior.

The obtained accurate set of material parameters for both Ag-rich and Ag-poor ChG systems and process variation verification on electrical characteristics enables greater fidelity in PMC device simulation, which significantly enhances our ability to understand the underlying physics of ChG-based resistive switching memory.

Contributors

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Multilevel resistance programming in conductive bridge resistive memory

Description

This work focuses on the existence of multiple resistance states in a type of emerging non-volatile resistive memory device known commonly as Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC) or Conductive Bridge Random

This work focuses on the existence of multiple resistance states in a type of emerging non-volatile resistive memory device known commonly as Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC) or Conductive Bridge Random Access Memory (CBRAM), which can be important for applications such as multi-bit memory as well as non-volatile logic and neuromorphic computing. First, experimental data from small signal, quasi-static and pulsed mode electrical characterization of such devices are presented which clearly demonstrate the inherent multi-level resistance programmability property in CBRAM devices. A physics based analytical CBRAM compact model is then presented which simulates the ion-transport dynamics and filamentary growth mechanism that causes resistance change in such devices. Simulation results from the model are fitted to experimental dynamic resistance switching characteristics. The model designed using Verilog-a language is computation-efficient and can be integrated with industry standard circuit simulation tools for design and analysis of hybrid circuits involving both CMOS and CBRAM devices. Three main circuit applications for CBRAM devices are explored in this work. Firstly, the susceptibility of CBRAM memory arrays to single event induced upsets is analyzed via compact model simulation and experimental heavy ion testing data that show possibility of both high resistance to low resistance and low resistance to high resistance transitions due to ion strikes. Next, a non-volatile sense amplifier based flip-flop architecture is proposed which can help make leakage power consumption negligible by allowing complete shutdown of power supply while retaining its output data in CBRAM devices. Reliability and energy consumption of the flip-flop circuit for different CBRAM low resistance levels and supply voltage values are analyzed and compared to CMOS designs. Possible extension of this architecture for threshold logic function computation using the CBRAM devices as re-configurable resistive weights is also discussed. Lastly, Spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) based gradual resistance change behavior in CBRAM device fabricated in back-end-of-line on a CMOS die containing integrate and fire CMOS neuron circuits is demonstrated for the first time which indicates the feasibility of using CBRAM devices as electronic synapses in spiking neural network hardware implementations for non-Boolean neuromorphic computing.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Analysis and design of native file system enhancements for storage class memory

Description

As persistent non-volatile memory solutions become integrated in the computing ecosystem and landscape, traditional commodity file systems architected and developed for traditional block I/O based memory solutions must be reevaluated.

As persistent non-volatile memory solutions become integrated in the computing ecosystem and landscape, traditional commodity file systems architected and developed for traditional block I/O based memory solutions must be reevaluated. A majority of commodity file systems have been architected and designed with the goal of managing data on non-volatile storage devices such as hard disk drives (HDDs) and solid state drives (SSDs). HDDs and SSDs are attached to a computing system via a controller or I/O hub, often referred to as the southbridge. The point of HDD and SSD attachment creates multiple levels of translation for any data managed by the CPU that must be stored in non-volatile memory (NVM) on an HDD or SSD. Storage Class Memory (SCM) devices provide the ability to store data at the CPU and DRAM level of a computing system. A novel set of modifications to the ext2 and ext4 commodity file systems to address the needs of SCM will be presented and discussed. An in-depth analysis of many existing file systems, from multiple sources, will be presented along with an analysis to identify key modifications and extensions that would be necessary to execute file system on SCM devices. From this analysis, modifications and extensions have been applied to the FAT commodity file system for key functional tests that will be presented to demonstrate the operation and execution of the file system extensions.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Retention of programmable metallization cells during ionizing radiation exposure

Description

Non-volatile memory (NVM) has become a staple in the everyday life of consumers. NVM manifests inside cell phones, laptops, and most recently, wearable tech such as smart watches. NAND Flash

Non-volatile memory (NVM) has become a staple in the everyday life of consumers. NVM manifests inside cell phones, laptops, and most recently, wearable tech such as smart watches. NAND Flash has been an excellent solution to conditions requiring fast, compact NVM. Current technology nodes are nearing the physical limits of scaling, preventing flash from improving. To combat the limitations of flash and to appease consumer demand for progressively faster and denser NVM, new technologies are needed. One possible candidate for the replacement of NAND Flash is programmable metallization cells (PMC). PMC are a type of resistive memory, meaning that they do not rely on charge storage to maintain a logic state. Depending on their application, it is possible that devices containing NVM will be exposed to harsh radiation environments. As part of the process for developing a novel memory technology, it is important to characterize the effects irradiation has on the functionality of the devices.

This thesis characterizes the effects that ionizing γ-ray irradiation has on the retention of the programmed resistive state of a PMC. The PMC devices tested used Ge30Se70 doped with Ag as the solid electrolyte layer and were fabricated by the thesis author in a Class 100 clean room. Individual device tiles were wire bonded into ceramic packages and tested in a biased and floating contact scenario.

The first scenario presented shows that PMC devices are capable of retaining their programmed state up to the maximum exposed total ionizing dose (TID) of 3.1 Mrad(Si). In this first scenario, the contacts of the PMC devices were left floating during exposure. The second scenario tested shows that the PMC devices are capable of retaining their state until the maximum TID of 10.1 Mrad(Si) was reached. The contacts in the second scenario were biased, with a 50 mV read voltage applied to the anode contact. Analysis of the results show that Ge30Se70 PMC are ionizing radiation tolerant and can retain a programmed state to a higher TID than NAND Flash memory.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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VerilogA modelling of programmable metallization cells

Description

There is an ever growing need for larger memories which are reliable and fast. New technologies to implement non-volatile memories which are large, fast, compact and cost-efficient are being studied

There is an ever growing need for larger memories which are reliable and fast. New technologies to implement non-volatile memories which are large, fast, compact and cost-efficient are being studied extensively. One of the most promising technologies being developed is the resistive RAM (ReRAM). In ReRAM the resistance of the device varies with the voltage applied across it. Programmable metallization cells (PMC) is one of the devices belonging to this category of non-volatile memories.

In order to advance the development of these devices, there is a need to develop simulation models which replicate the behavior of these devices in circuits. In this thesis, a verilogA model for the PMC has been developed. The behavior of the model has been tested using DC and transient simulations. Experimental data obtained from testing PMC devices fabricated at Arizona State University have been compared to results obtained from simulation.

A basic memory cell known as the 1T 1R cell built using the PMC has also been simulated and verified. These memory cells have the potential to be building blocks of large scale memories. I believe that the verilogA model developed in this thesis will prove to be a powerful tool for researchers and circuit developers looking to develop non-volatile memories using alternative technologies.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Characterization of copper-doped silicon dioxide programmable metallization cells

Description

Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC) is a resistance-switching device based on migration of nanoscale quantities of cations in a solid electrolyte and formation of a conducting electrodeposit by the reductions of

Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC) is a resistance-switching device based on migration of nanoscale quantities of cations in a solid electrolyte and formation of a conducting electrodeposit by the reductions of these cations. This dissertation presents electrical characterization results on Cu-SiO2 based PMC devices, which due to the na- ture of materials can be easily integrated into the current Complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process line. Device structures representing individual mem- ory cells based on W bottom electrode and n-type Si bottom electrode were fabricated for characterization. For the W bottom electrode based devices, switching was ob- served for voltages in the range of 500mV and current value as low as 100 nA showing the electrochemical nature and low power potential. The ON state showed a direct de- pendence on the programming current, showing the possibility of multi-bit storage in a single cell. Room temperature retention was demonstrated in excess of 105 seconds and endurance to approximately 107 cycles. Switching was observed for microsecond duration 3 V amplitude pulses. Material characterization results from Raman, X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering and Secondary-ion mass spectroscopy analysis shows the influence of processing conditions on the Cu concentration within the film and also the presence of Cu as free atoms. The results seemed to indicate stress-induced void formation in the SiO2 matrix as the driving mechanism for Cu diffusion into the SiO2 film. Cu/SiO2
Si based PMC devices were characterized and were shown to have inherent isolation characteristics, proving the feasibility of such a structure for a passive array. The inherent isolation property simplifies fabrication by avoiding the need for a separate diode element in an array. The isolation characteristics were studied mainly in terms of the leakage current. The nature of the diode interface was further studied by extracting a barrier potential which shows it can be approximated to a Cu-nSi metal semiconductor Schottky diode.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011