Matching Items (5)

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To help others like me: Quechan and Cocopah postsecondary persistence for nation-building

Description

Native American students often enter postsecondary education as means of serving a broader community. Studies among a broad base of tribes found that the desire to serve a larger community

Native American students often enter postsecondary education as means of serving a broader community. Studies among a broad base of tribes found that the desire to serve a larger community acts as a motivation to persist through college. However, institutions of higher education often center on individualistic empowerment rather than focusing on how to empower tribal communities.

Due to the lack of quality datasets that lend to quantitative research, our understanding of factors related to American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) postsecondary persistence has primarily been based on qualitative studies The purpose of this study is to understand how the desire to serve a larger community influences current and former Cocopah and Quechan undergraduate students’ college persistence. The study adds to the Native American postsecondary persistence literature base, that up till now, has not quantitatively examined students’ desire to serve a larger community as a persistence factor while intentionally sampling two smaller tribes with tribal enrollments less than four thousand.

This dissertation presents a Native American persistence model and alternative method of sampling small Indigenous nations, establishes construct validity for an instrument measuring the proposed persistence model and provides evidence the proposed model predicts postsecondary persistence and academic performance. The design of the model derives from a review theories and scholarship on Native American persistence. Subsequently, construction of an instrument measuring the model emerged from the theories, literature, expert feedback, and pilot testing. Using data collected from an online survey of a sample of Cocopah and Quechan students (n=117), the study provides evidence of construct validity of the instrument through an exploratory factor analysis. Following the instrument validation, regression analyses indicates that AI/AN postsecondary persistence within both two-year and four-year institutions is positively associated with student desire to give back. The evidence further suggests that researchers, practitioners, and administrators should expand programs that center on nation-building to increase the persistence of Native American students while simultaneously meeting the needs of tribal nations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Individual and combined impact of institutional student support strategies on first-time, full-time, degree-seeking community college students

Description

Although U.S. rates of college enrollment among 18-24 year olds have reached historic highs, rates of degree completion have not kept pace. This is especially evident at community colleges, where

Although U.S. rates of college enrollment among 18-24 year olds have reached historic highs, rates of degree completion have not kept pace. This is especially evident at community colleges, where a disproportionate number of students from groups who, historically, have had low college-completion rates enroll. One way community colleges are attempting to address low completion rates is by implementing institutional interventions intended to increase opportunities for student engagement at their colleges. Utilizing logistic and linear regression analyses, this study focused on community college students, examining the association between participation in institutional support activities and student outcomes, while controlling for specific student characteristics known to impact student success in college. The sample included 746 first-time, full-time, degree-seeking students at a single community college located in the U.S. Southwest. Additional analyses were conducted for the 440 first-time, full-time, degree-seeking students in this sample who placed into at least one developmental education course. Findings indicate that significant associations exist between different types of participation in institutional interventions and various student outcomes: Academic advising was found to be related to increased rates of Fall to Spring and Fall to Fall persistence and, for developmental education students, participation in a student success course was found to be related to an increase in the proportion of course credit hours earned. The results of this study provide evidence that student participation in institutional-level support may relate to increased rates of college persistence and credit hour completion; however, additional inquiry is warranted to inform specific policy and program decision-making at the college and to determine if these findings are generalizable to populations outside of this college setting.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Indigenous students navigating community college: an assessment of culturally-based empowerment workshops

Description

Indigenous students have not been achieving their educational goals similar to other racial and ethnic groups. In 2008 Native American students completed a bachelor's degree at a rate of 38.3%

Indigenous students have not been achieving their educational goals similar to other racial and ethnic groups. In 2008 Native American students completed a bachelor's degree at a rate of 38.3% the lowest rate of all racial and ethnic groups and lower than the national average of 57.2%. The high attrition rate of Native students in post-secondary education, nationally, suggests that on-going colonization may be to blame. Much of the research exploring retention strategies found culturally sensitive institutions, family and peer support, supportive relationships with faculty and staff, skill development, and financial aid knowledge were consistent factors for student retention. No studies have examined the effects of cultural workshops as decolonizing practices, however. This action research examined the influence of a series of cultural workshops to address Native student and college community needs. Employing a mixed-methods design, this project framed the cultural workshops within decolonization and historical trauma. Five student participants attended five cultural workshops and completed questionnaires to offer insight into their college behaviors while journals were used to learn about their experiences within the workshops. The results of this study are consistent with the literature. There was no change in relationships as a result of the intervention, but relationships with faculty and staff that mimicked family were reported as important for student success. Participating students were at early stages in the decolonization process but were further along when they had experiences in college with American Indian Studies or faculty. Students felt that colonizing practices at the college must be challenged and Indigenous traditional practices must be integrated to create a culturally competent institution. Additional sessions are recommended to increase data collection and allow participants to develop and share their rich feedback with the college.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Evaluation of a biofeedback intervention in college students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders

Description

This study used exploratory data analysis (EDA) to examine the use of a biofeedback intervention in the treatment of anxiety for college students diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

This study used exploratory data analysis (EDA) to examine the use of a biofeedback intervention in the treatment of anxiety for college students diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (n=10) and in a typical college population (n=37). The use of EDA allowed for trends to emerge from the data and provided a foundation for future research in the areas of biofeedback and accommodations for college students with ASD. Comparing the first five weeks of the study with the second five weeks of the 10 week study, both groups showed improvement in their control of heart rate variability, a physiological marker for anxiety used in biofeedback. The ASD group showed greater gains, more consistent gains, and less variability in raw scores than the typical group. EDA also revealed a pattern between participant attrition and a participant's biofeedback progress. Implications are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Postsecondary transition in Individuals on the autism spectrum

Description

Literature reviews, books, and research studies are reviewed in this thesis with the purpose of examining the postsecondary transition of young adults on the autism spectrum (AS). Previous research on

Literature reviews, books, and research studies are reviewed in this thesis with the purpose of examining the postsecondary transition of young adults on the autism spectrum (AS). Previous research on the specific social, legislative, victimization, and self-determination issues that young adults on the AS face during their postsecondary transition process is extensively examined as well as research that addresses the viewpoints of postsecondary programs from the perspectives of caregivers and young adults. Research studies and literature reviews that address current postsecondary programs for those on the AS and current adult outcomes for those on the AS are also included in the literature review section. The research aspect of the current thesis involved a postsecondary education transition team at Arizona State University who compared the viewpoints of young adults and parents of young adults on the AS on their experience with the postsecondary transition process and what they believe should be fundamental aspects of the postsecondary transition process. Two forms of a survey were administered (one for the young adult population and another for the parent population). Survey results found a lot of similarities and differences in terms of how caregivers and young adults felt about postsecondary transition. Although both young adults and caregivers expressed a strong interest in postsecondary programs for students with autism, both groups expressed that the likelihood of the young adult attending such a program would be significantly less. Differing viewpoints between the two populations existed on what a postsecondary program should look like. Although the two groups did agree that such programs should consist of an employment and social activities component, young adults felt that programs should have a more diverse set of criteria. Following completion of a secondary program, caregivers saw young adults attending a postsecondary education institution, while young adults perceived themselves as transferring directly into the workforce. On the contrary, caregivers did demonstrate an even variability in choice for opinions. The thesis concludes with the many implications for this study and suggestions for future research.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011