Matching Items (11)

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White College Boy Steelbands" in 1950s Trinidad: how middle-class teenagers helped the steelpan gain national acceptance

Description

This document highlights the increased involvement of “ college boys ” or “ white college boys ” - better-educated middle-class white and light-skinned persons - in steelbands in the late

This document highlights the increased involvement of “ college boys ” or “ white college boys ” - better-educated middle-class white and light-skinned persons - in steelbands in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Following an introductory overview of the demography of Trinidad and Tobago, the history of Carnival, and the interregnum of the temporary instruments used between the ban of indigenous drums in the 1880s and the invention of the steelpan at the end of the 1930s, this document will examine the history and membership of these college boy bands, with particular emphasis on the Hit Paraders. Two factors that highlight the vital role played by these college boy steelbands are discussed: commercial sponsorship of bands, and support that bands received from the People's National Movement Party. A detailed timeline of steelpan invention and innovations is also included.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Yoga and saxophone performance: the integration of two disciplines

Description

The integration of yoga into the music curriculum has the potential of offering many immediate and life-long benefits to musicians. Yoga can help address issues such as performance anxiety and

The integration of yoga into the music curriculum has the potential of offering many immediate and life-long benefits to musicians. Yoga can help address issues such as performance anxiety and musculoskeletal problems, and enhance focus and awareness during musical practice and performance. Although the philosophy of yoga has many similarities to the process of learning a musical instrument, the benefits of yoga for musicians is a topic that has gained attention only recently. This document explores several ways in which the practice and philosophy of yoga can be fused with saxophone pedagogy as one way to prepare students for a healthy and successful musical career. A six-week study at Arizona State University was conducted to observe the effects of regular yoga practice on collegiate saxophone students. Nine participants attended a sixty-minute "yoga for musicians" class twice a week. Measures included pre- and post- study questionnaires as well as personal journals kept throughout the duration of the study. These self-reported results showed that yoga had positive effects on saxophone playing. It significantly increased physical comfort and positive thinking, and improved awareness of habitual patterns and breath control. Student participants responded positively to the idea of integrating such a course into the music curriculum. The integration of yoga and saxophone by qualified professionals could also be a natural part of studio class and individual instruction. Carrie Koffman, professor of saxophone at The Hartt School, University of Hartford, has established one strong model for the combination of these disciplines. Her methods and philosophy, together with the basics of Western-style hatha yoga, clinical reports on performance injuries, and qualitative data from the ASU study are explored. These inquiries form the foundation of a new model for integrating yoga practice regularly into the saxophone studio.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Biographies of the most influential twentieth century trumpet players in Asia

Description

ABSTRACT:

The research for this paper is intended to introduce the reader to many of the influential trumpet performers and pedagogues in East

ABSTRACT:

The research for this paper is intended to introduce the reader to many of the influential trumpet performers and pedagogues in East Asian countries and territories along the Western Pacific Ocean Rim, including China, Hong Kong, Japan, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan (R.O.C.), Thailand, and Vietnam.

Shao-Chun Tsai, the author of this research paper, finds it important for musicians to recognize that they are often influenced by other musicians in addition to their own efforts and self-discovery of who they are as artists. The author is a trumpeter and pianist from Taiwan, and would like to acknowledge the many outstanding trumpet players from Asia that have made important contributions to the discipline of trumpet playing. Unfortunately, there are very limited English resources available for the recognition of these pioneers, and as such they are often unknown to the general public and even to aspiring musicians. By gathering a collection of biographies, the author’s goal is to shed greater light on the rich trumpet playing and pedagogy heritage and influence in this region.

The research information contained within was primarily gathered through personal interviews conducted by the author in order to ensure that the most up-to-date and accurate information was collected for the project. This project studies nine regions and includes thirty-seven trumpeters deemed to be influential by the author, who has invested her best efforts to acquire the most in-depth and current facts obtainable. The author hopes that the stories behind each of these successful musicians will stimulate trumpeters of all ages and inspire them to pursue their own development and goals in music.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Pilates and string musicians: an exploration of the issues addressed by the pilates method, an illustrated guide to adapted exercises, and a pilates course for university string players

Description

String players have been identified as the most affected group of instrumentalists suffering from musculoskeletal disorders, and most of the problems are related to posture. The high prevalence of injuries

String players have been identified as the most affected group of instrumentalists suffering from musculoskeletal disorders, and most of the problems are related to posture. The high prevalence of injuries among string players suggests that there is room in the music curriculum for a program tailored to this population and that can provide both immediate and long-term solutions. Pilates is a mind-body conditioning method of exercises and a philosophy that shares many similarities with string playing technique and performance, which suggests that its practice can be beneficial to improve not only the posture of string players but also various other areas. Studies about Pilates as a treatment show the varied areas in which Pilates can help, which are all of interest to instrumentalists. However, the application of Pilates into the music curriculum as a way to help string players improve awareness and reduce injuries has not yet been fully explored. This document addresses the similarities between Pilates and string playing, identifies postural tendencies of string players, and demonstrates how specific Pilates exercises can help counteract asymmetries, restore balance, and reduce the number of musculoskeletal injuries of string players. All anatomical drawings included in this document were adapted from other sources, as cited, or originally drawn by the author.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Bullying and Performance Anxiety in Classically Trained Singers

Description

A strong correlation exists between the effects of bullying on a singer and his or her performance anxiety. An exhaustive literature review and a survey of classical singers were used

A strong correlation exists between the effects of bullying on a singer and his or her performance anxiety. An exhaustive literature review and a survey of classical singers were used to assess this hypothesis. The survey was compiled using standard psychological and current performance anxiety questionnaires with additional questions created by the author. The data were analyzed using a Pearson Product-Moment Correlation, a regression analysis, and an Analysis of Variance.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Wellness resources at postsecondary music schools: a survey of how this information is being offered

Description

Musicians have the potential to experience health problems related to their

profession. The National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) requires schools to

provide information about wellness. There are 634 degree-granting, not

Musicians have the potential to experience health problems related to their

profession. The National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) requires schools to

provide information about wellness. There are 634 degree-granting, not for profit, NASM

accredited postsecondary music schools in America. This study examined the types of

wellness resources offered at 387 of these schools or 60%. Wellness information was

divided into three categories: physical, psychological and hearing. The types of resources

offered, category of information and the size of the school were considered. Schools were

emailed and their websites were searched for wellness information.

Forty-eight percent of the schools had website information, 32% offered wellness

workshops, 16% of the schools offered wellness courses, and 32% of the schools covered

wellness information through other methods. Nineteen percent of the schools said that

they did not offer courses or workshops and did not say how they are meeting the

requirement. Physical wellness information was most widely available, followed by

hearing information, while psychological wellness information was harder to find.

Smaller schools were less likely to offer wellness courses but otherwise the size of a

school did not play a significant role in the types of wellness resources they were able to

offer.

Based on the findings, more schools should incorporate wellness information on

their websites and hold wellness workshops. Psychological wellness information should

be more widely available. Schools should advertise the wellness information that they

offer so that students are aware of the options available to them.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Three Interviews: Diverse Career Paths of Female-Identifying Professional Trombonists

Description

The purpose of this document is to identify contemporary issues facing female-identifying professional trombonists today. Interviews were conducted with three prominent women in the international trombone community, including questions that

The purpose of this document is to identify contemporary issues facing female-identifying professional trombonists today. Interviews were conducted with three prominent women in the international trombone community, including questions that sought to foster discussion on the extent to which their experience as professional trombonists was influenced by their gender. The topic of microaggressions emerged as significant, as it became clear throughout the interview process that these women experience microaggressions far more commonly than overt gender discrimination, as did the topic of coping mechanisms. The interview questions also sparked discussions of identity, self-motivation, and local cultural norms within the context of each woman’s musical career.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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An ethnology of Arizona early music performers in the twentieth century

Description

ABSTRACT A cultural overview of the so-called "early music movement" in Arizona, specifically the musicians who performed early music in the mid-to-late twentieth century, has never been undertaken. In applying

ABSTRACT A cultural overview of the so-called "early music movement" in Arizona, specifically the musicians who performed early music in the mid-to-late twentieth century, has never been undertaken. In applying ethnographic methods to Western art music, Kay Kaufman Shelemay suggests, in her 2001 article, "Toward an Ethnomusicology of the Early Music Movement," that a musical anthropology "would seem to hold great potential for the study of `Western music.'" In this paper I analyze and discuss issues related to "early music" in Arizona from roughly 1960 to 2008. In focusing primarily on the musicians themselves, I address issues in three primary areas: 1) the repertory and the so-called "early music revival;" 2) specific types of early music which have been presented in Arizona and the effects of economic factors; and 3) Arizona musicians' attitudes toward the repertory and their motivations for specializing in it. I then analyze Arizona musicians' involvement with both the early music repertory itself and with the community, identifying how musicians were exposed to early music and whether or not those first exposures began a long-lasting involvement with the repertory. In this section I also describe ways in which musicians define early music for themselves as well as analyze more critical areas such as musicians' formation of an "early music identity." I also asked informants to discuss how they see early music as being fundamentally different from other types of "classical" music and how they view their own places in that community of "difference." Finally, I compare musicians' thoughts on the "transformative" effect that some early music can have on performers and listeners and how that effect compares with similar phenomena in other types of Western art music.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2010

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Standards of professionalism in the music community: surveys and conclusions

Description

This study seeks to identify the unwritten rules and standards of professional conduct followed by the music community. Its central source of information is a pair of surveys sent

This study seeks to identify the unwritten rules and standards of professional conduct followed by the music community. Its central source of information is a pair of surveys sent to professional musicians, specifically members of large instrumental ensembles across the United States. The first survey posed multiple-choice questions on topics related to personal professional standards, rehearsal and concert etiquette and protocol, and ethical obligations. The second survey followed up with consenting individual participants and requested stories and anecdotes from the respondents’ professional careers. The surveys yielded 70 responses from the initial 350 solicitations, representing 35 professional ensembles in 30 cities and 20 states, 18 different instruments, 41 principal players, and nearly 2,000 combined years of professional music experience. The findings shed light on many specific aspects of professionalism in the music community, and they demonstrate that an unwritten code of largely understood and observed expectations both exists and varies minimally throughout professional ensembles across the United States. The consummate professional musician is prompt, prepared, and observant of an array of expectations generated by the routines and hierarchies of rehearsals and concerts. Understanding the professional attributes and practices of successful ensemble members is important to aspiring musicians, and so this study is intended as a useful resource both for students and their teachers.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Motivational and social network dynamics of ensemble music making: a longitudinal investigation of a collegiate marching band

Description

People are motivated to participate in musical activities for many reasons. Whereas musicians may be driven by an intrinsic desire for musical growth, self-determination theory suggests that this drive must

People are motivated to participate in musical activities for many reasons. Whereas musicians may be driven by an intrinsic desire for musical growth, self-determination theory suggests that this drive must also be sustained and supported by the social environment. Social network analysis is an interdisciplinary theoretical framework and collection of analytical methods that allows us to describe the social context of a musical ensemble. These frameworks are utilized to investigate the relationship of participatory motivation and social networks in a large Division I collegiate marching band. This study concludes that marching band members are predominantly self-determined to participate in marching band and are particularly motivated for social reasons, regardless of their experience over the course of the band season. The members who are highly motived are also more integrated into the band's friendship and advice networks. These highly integrated members also tend to be motivated by the value and importance others display for the marching band activity suggesting these members have begun to internalized those values and seek out others with similar viewpoints. These findings highlight the central nature of the social experience of marching band and have possible implications for other musical leisure ensembles. After a brief review of social music making and the theoretical frameworks, I will provide illustrations of the relationship between motivation and social networks in a musical ensemble, consider the implications of these findings for promoting self-determined motivation and the wellbeing of musical ensembles, and identify directions for future research.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015