Matching Items (6)

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Robust distributed parameter estimation in wireless sensor networks

Description

Fully distributed wireless sensor networks (WSNs) without fusion center have advantages such as scalability in network size and energy efficiency in communications. Each sensor shares its data only with neighbors

Fully distributed wireless sensor networks (WSNs) without fusion center have advantages such as scalability in network size and energy efficiency in communications. Each sensor shares its data only with neighbors and then achieves global consensus quantities by in-network processing. This dissertation considers robust distributed parameter estimation methods, seeking global consensus on parameters of adaptive learning algorithms and statistical quantities.

Diffusion adaptation strategy with nonlinear transmission is proposed. The nonlinearity was motivated by the necessity for bounded transmit power, as sensors need to iteratively communicate each other energy-efficiently. Despite the nonlinearity, it is shown that the algorithm performs close to the linear case with the added advantage of power savings. This dissertation also discusses convergence properties of the algorithm in the mean and the mean-square sense.

Often, average is used to measure central tendency of sensed data over a network. When there are outliers in the data, however, average can be highly biased. Alternative choices of robust metrics against outliers are median, mode, and trimmed mean. Quantiles generalize the median, and they also can be used for trimmed mean. Consensus-based distributed quantile estimation algorithm is proposed and applied for finding trimmed-mean, median, maximum or minimum values, and identification of outliers through simulation. It is shown that the estimated quantities are asymptotically unbiased and converges toward the sample quantile in the mean-square sense. Step-size sequences with proper decay rates are also discussed for convergence analysis.

Another measure of central tendency is a mode which represents the most probable value and also be robust to outliers and other contaminations in data. The proposed distributed mode estimation algorithm achieves a global mode by recursively shifting conditional mean of the measurement data until it converges to stationary points of estimated density function. It is also possible to estimate the mode by utilizing grid vector as well as kernel density estimator. The densities are estimated at each grid point, while the points are updated until they converge to a global mode.

Contributors

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

A distributed component-based software framework for laboratory automation systems

Description

Laboratory automation systems have seen a lot of technological advances in recent times. As a result, the software that is written for them are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Existing software architectures

Laboratory automation systems have seen a lot of technological advances in recent times. As a result, the software that is written for them are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Existing software architectures and standards are targeted to a wider domain of software development and need to be customized in order to use them for developing software for laboratory automation systems. This thesis proposes an architecture that is based on existing software architectural paradigms and is specifically tailored to developing software for a laboratory automation system. The architecture is based on fairly autonomous software components that can be distributed across multiple computers. The components in the architecture make use of asynchronous communication methodologies that are facilitated by passing messages between one another. The architecture can be used to develop software that is distributed, responsive and thread-safe. The thesis also proposes a framework that has been developed to implement the ideas proposed by the architecture. The framework is used to develop software that is scalable, distributed, responsive and thread-safe. The framework currently has components to control very commonly used laboratory automation devices such as mechanical stages, cameras, and also to do common laboratory automation functionalities such as imaging.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Consensus algorithms and distributed structure estimation in wireless sensor networks

Description

Distributed wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have attracted researchers recently due to their advantages such as low power consumption, scalability and robustness to link failures. In sensor networks with no fusion

Distributed wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have attracted researchers recently due to their advantages such as low power consumption, scalability and robustness to link failures. In sensor networks with no fusion center, consensus is a process where

all the sensors in the network achieve global agreement using only local transmissions. In this dissertation, several consensus and consensus-based algorithms in WSNs are studied.

Firstly, a distributed consensus algorithm for estimating the maximum and minimum value of the initial measurements in a sensor network in the presence of communication noise is proposed. In the proposed algorithm, a soft-max approximation together with a non-linear average consensus algorithm is used. A design parameter controls the trade-off between the soft-max error and convergence speed. An analysis of this trade-off gives guidelines towards how to choose the design parameter for the max estimate. It is also shown that if some prior knowledge of the initial measurements is available, the consensus process can be accelerated.

Secondly, a distributed system size estimation algorithm is proposed. The proposed algorithm is based on distributed average consensus and L2 norm estimation. Different sources of error are explicitly discussed, and the distribution of the final estimate is derived. The CRBs for system size estimator with average and max consensus strategies are also considered, and different consensus based system size estimation approaches are compared.

Then, a consensus-based network center and radius estimation algorithm is described. The center localization problem is formulated as a convex optimization problem with a summation form by using soft-max approximation with exponential functions. Distributed optimization methods such as stochastic gradient descent and diffusion adaptation are used to estimate the center. Then, max consensus is used to compute the radius of the network area.

Finally, two average consensus based distributed estimation algorithms are introduced: distributed degree distribution estimation algorithm and algorithm for tracking the dynamics of the desired parameter. Simulation results for all proposed algorithms are provided.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Materialized views over heterogeneous structured data sources in a distributed event stream processing environment

Description

Data-driven applications are becoming increasingly complex with support for processing events and data streams in a loosely-coupled distributed environment, providing integrated access to heterogeneous data sources such as relational databases

Data-driven applications are becoming increasingly complex with support for processing events and data streams in a loosely-coupled distributed environment, providing integrated access to heterogeneous data sources such as relational databases and XML documents. This dissertation explores the use of materialized views over structured heterogeneous data sources to support multiple query optimization in a distributed event stream processing framework that supports such applications involving various query expressions for detecting events, monitoring conditions, handling data streams, and querying data. Materialized views store the results of the computed view so that subsequent access to the view retrieves the materialized results, avoiding the cost of recomputing the entire view from base data sources. Using a service-based metadata repository that provides metadata level access to the various language components in the system, a heuristics-based algorithm detects the common subexpressions from the queries represented in a mixed multigraph model over relational and structured XML data sources. These common subexpressions can be relational, XML or a hybrid join over the heterogeneous data sources. This research examines the challenges in the definition and materialization of views when the heterogeneous data sources are retained in their native format, instead of converting the data to a common model. LINQ serves as the materialized view definition language for creating the view definitions. An algorithm is introduced that uses LINQ to create a data structure for the persistence of these hybrid views. Any changes to base data sources used to materialize views are captured and mapped to a delta structure. The deltas are then streamed within the framework for use in the incremental update of the materialized view. Algorithms are presented that use the magic sets query optimization approach to both efficiently materialize the views and to propagate the relevant changes to the views for incremental maintenance. Using representative scenarios over structured heterogeneous data sources, an evaluation of the framework demonstrates an improvement in performance. Thus, defining the LINQ-based materialized views over heterogeneous structured data sources using the detected common subexpressions and incrementally maintaining the views by using magic sets enhances the efficiency of the distributed event stream processing environment.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Establishing distributed social network trust model in MobiCloud system

Description

This thesis proposed a novel approach to establish the trust model in a social network scenario based on users' emails. Email is one of the most important social connections nowadays.

This thesis proposed a novel approach to establish the trust model in a social network scenario based on users' emails. Email is one of the most important social connections nowadays. By analyzing email exchange activities among users, a social network trust model can be established to judge the trust rate between each two users. The whole trust checking process is divided into two steps: local checking and remote checking. Local checking directly contacts the email server to calculate the trust rate based on user's own email communication history. Remote checking is a distributed computing process to get help from user's social network friends and built the trust rate together. The email-based trust model is built upon a cloud computing framework called MobiCloud. Inside MobiCloud, each user occupies a virtual machine which can directly communicate with others. Based on this feature, the distributed trust model is implemented as a combination of local analysis and remote analysis in the cloud. Experiment results show that the trust evaluation model can give accurate trust rate even in a small scale social network which does not have lots of social connections. With this trust model, the security in both social network services and email communication could be improved.

Contributors

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Detecting sybil nodes in static and dynamic networks

Description

Peer-to-peer systems are known to be vulnerable to the Sybil attack. The lack of a central authority allows a malicious user to create many fake identities (called Sybil nodes) pretending

Peer-to-peer systems are known to be vulnerable to the Sybil attack. The lack of a central authority allows a malicious user to create many fake identities (called Sybil nodes) pretending to be independent honest nodes. The goal of the malicious user is to influence the system on his/her behalf. In order to detect the Sybil nodes and prevent the attack, a reputation system is used for the nodes, built through observing its interactions with its peers. The construction makes every node a part of a distributed authority that keeps records on the reputation and behavior of the nodes. Records of interactions between nodes are broadcast by the interacting nodes and honest reporting proves to be a Nash Equilibrium for correct (non-Sybil) nodes. In this research is argued that in realistic communication schedule scenarios, simple graph-theoretic queries such as the computation of Strongly Connected Components and Densest Subgraphs, help in exposing those nodes most likely to be Sybil, which are then proved to be Sybil or not through a direct test executed by some peers.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2010