Matching Items (4)

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Professional development in early childhood education: effects of a virtual community of practice on implementing best practices

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This mixed methods study examined whether participation in a virtual community of practice (vCoP) could impact the implementation of new skills learned in a professional development session and help to

This mixed methods study examined whether participation in a virtual community of practice (vCoP) could impact the implementation of new skills learned in a professional development session and help to close the research to implementation gap.

Six participants attended a common professional development session and completed pre- , mid- , and post-intervention surveys regarding their implementation of social emotional teaching strategies as well as face-to-face interviews.

Both quantitative and qualitative data was examined to determine if participation in the vCoP impacted implementation of skills learned in the PD session. Quantitative data was inconclusive but qualitative data showed an appreciation for participation in the vCoP and access to the resources shared by the participants. Limitations and implications for future cycles of research are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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The impact of a focused professional development project on the practices and career paths of early childhood education teachers

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ABSTRACT Early childhood education (ECE) teacher professional development refers to the various modalities of providing new and or additional content knowledge to the teachers who work with children birth to

ABSTRACT Early childhood education (ECE) teacher professional development refers to the various modalities of providing new and or additional content knowledge to the teachers who work with children birth to five. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an Arizona United Way-administered intervention project designed to provide focused professional development activities to 15 ECE teachers at seven high-need, center-based early care and education settings. Specifically, this study determined if these interventions influenced the teachers to undertake formative career path changes such as college coursework. In addition, the study also sought to understand the views, beliefs, and attitudes of these ECE teachers and if/how their perspectives influenced their educational career paths. Data were gathered through the triangulated use of participants' responses to a survey, face-to-face interviews, and a focus group. Findings demonstrate that the teachers understand that professional development, such as college coursework, can increase a person's knowledge on a given topic or field of study, but that they feel qualified to be a teacher for children birth to five even though 12 of the 15 teachers do not hold an AA/AAS or BA/BS degree in any area of study. Further, the teachers suggested that if they were to earn a degree it would most likely be in another field of study beside education. These responses provide another reason professional development efforts to encourage ECE teachers to seek degrees in the field of education may be failing. If ECE teachers wanted to invest time, energy and funds they would acquire a degree, which provided more financial reward and professional respect. 

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Date Created
  • 2011

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Lost in transition: the effect of split student teaching experience on beginning early childhood teachers' practices

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Arizona State University's (ASU) teacher education program has been restructured several times in the last two decades to train teachers to teach children more effectively by responding to their individual

Arizona State University's (ASU) teacher education program has been restructured several times in the last two decades to train teachers to teach children more effectively by responding to their individual needs and learning demands. One of the reasons for restructuring was to respond to new licensing requirements by the State. To serve young children's needs, the state of Arizona required individuals working with young children to obtain either early childhood licensing or endorsement by January, 2009. Responding to these new requirements, ASU now requires student teaching in a preschool setting in addition to the existing Kindergarten to third grade student teaching and internship requirements. This study addressed the question of teacher preparation and self-efficacy based on this newly restructured teaching model used in the ASU Tempe teacher education program. The following questions guided this study: 1) What effects do beginning teachers perceive that their split-student teaching experiences have on their experience as a new teacher; 2) How do beginning teachers' prior schooling, educational, and personal background influence their current teaching; and 3) What role does home, family, and collegial support play as beginning teachers start their teaching career? A qualitative case study research method was utilized in this study. Two face-to-face, in-depth individual interviews and one focus group interview with three second-year and two third-year beginning teachers were utilized to understand their experiences in the program and in their beginning years of teaching. An analysis of interview data revealed beginning teachers' student teaching experiences partially fulfilled their need of having adequate in-classroom experience before starting their teaching careers; yet they highlighted some suggestions for student teaching assignments to better prepare prospective teacher candidates in the program. Moreover, they expressed both satisfaction and dissatisfaction toward courses taken in the program. Their statements also emphasized the importance of having effective mentorship in their student teaching and first year of teaching. Support from administration, experienced colleagues, friends, and family members were also acknowledged as highly valuable as they struggled with issues in their beginning career.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2010

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A descriptive study of early childhood teachers' music practices in the state of Arizona

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This dissertation discusses the findings of a descriptive study of early childhood teachers' musical practices in the state of Arizona. Drawing from socio-cultural and cultural-historical activity theory perspectives, this study

This dissertation discusses the findings of a descriptive study of early childhood teachers' musical practices in the state of Arizona. Drawing from socio-cultural and cultural-historical activity theory perspectives, this study utilized an online survey design for 2 months in which 312 participants from distinctive types of programs responded to 42 items that addressed early childhood teachers' music practices, perceived role of music, the teachers' preparation, challenges and needs for teaching music in their programs. The study uses the findings to explore how music is incorporated into the curriculum, its role, challenges and needs for teachers as well as inform policy makers of the effectiveness of music in early childhood curriculum that might bring about a resurgence of thinking about funding opportunities to promote music in different programs that serve children. These results reflected the diversity of most early childhood programs in the U.S in areas of scheduling, types of programs, working environments and curricular approaches used as well as in the duration and frequencies of music activities. However, there was a significant difference between how music was used in elementary versus early childhood centers. The results revealed that, although teachers used music at various times, for various reasons, planned or unplanned and as an integral part of other content areas, there was great variance in the manner in which music was emphasized in the total curriculum. In this study context, music in early childhood education centers was mostly teacher led and its value was geared towards specific behavioral outcome such as enhancement of language development rather than sheer enjoyment and relaxation. Although teachers used music on a daily basis, they were inadequately prepared and most teachers were looking for opportunities to improve their music abilities including required courses and workshops on ways of effectively incorporating music into curriculum/classroom. Funding, time and lack of confidence remain top challenges for early childhood and elementary teachers. The study recommends that music courses be required in teacher education programs and refresher workshops for in-service teachers about how to effectively use music in classrooms be more widely available.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011