Matching Items (5)

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Adolescent motivation for healthy behaviors: a theory-based enhanced health curriculum for adolescents

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ABSTRACT

Adolescence is a period marked by significant physical, developmental, cognitive, and social changes, all of which contribute to health concerns for teens. A steady rise in life expectancy over

ABSTRACT

Adolescence is a period marked by significant physical, developmental, cognitive, and social changes, all of which contribute to health concerns for teens. A steady rise in life expectancy over the past two centuries is potentially diminishing due to the increase in prevalence, severity, and consequences of obesity in children and adolescents related to unhealthy lifestyle behaviors. Health behaviors are often established during childhood and adolescence that continue into adulthood. The development and integration of healthy lifestyle behaviors are vital through adolescence. Self-determination theory (SDT) offers a theoretical framework for attempting to understand individual differences in motivation and behavior. Recent studies have primarily focused on how adolescents make choices related to eating behaviors, physical activity, and self-care habits, and how the resultant behaviors are measured. Participants in this study were 63 healthy adolescents enrolled in 9th grade health class. All participants provided baseline data at Time 1 and again following the five-week pretest posttest intervention study at Time 2. This study examined the utility of SDT in the development of the Adolescent Intrinsic Motivation, a healthy lifestyle behavior intervention, using the tenets of SDT to explain healthy lifestyle motivational beliefs in adolescents, along with healthy lifestyle behaviors and knowledge. The AIM intervention study introduced basic health recommendations to adolescents in an autonomy-supportive environment, which has been shown to encourage the adolescent to make healthy behavior choices based on their own interest and enjoyment. Preliminary effects of the study indicated that participants receiving the AIM intervention demonstrated significant differences in motivational beliefs, healthy lifestyle knowledge, as well as healthy lifestyle behaviors from Time 1 (baseline) to Time 2 (post-intervention). Results of this study provide support for the use of SDT to address the competence, relatedness, and autonomy of adolescents in the development of health education material. Testing this intervention in a larger, random sampling of schools within the state, or even in more than one state, with a three- or six-month follow-up would be useful in determining the longer-term effects of the intervention.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Collateral effects of a family-focused behavioral intervention on physical activity

Description

There are significant and wide-ranging health benefits of physical activity, yet the majority of adolescents in the United States do not engage in the recommended amount. This poses a significant

There are significant and wide-ranging health benefits of physical activity, yet the majority of adolescents in the United States do not engage in the recommended amount. This poses a significant public health challenge. Parents have a substantial influence on adolescents' levels of activity, indicating that parenting may be an especially salient target of interventions designed to promote physical activity. The current study tested the hypothesis that a family intervention to promote effective parenting would have a positive collateral effect on adolescent physical activity. This study also tested whether the increase in activity was mediated by changes in parental monitoring and family relationship quality. Furthermore, the current study assessed whether adolescent gender moderated the relationship between parental monitoring and physical activity, such that increased parental monitoring predicted increases in physical activity for girls, but not for boys. Participants were 232 adolescents at risk for behavior problems drawn from a larger randomized controlled trial of the Family Check-Up. Adolescents completed questionnaires and participated in a family assessment with their caregivers in the 6th through 9th grades. Youth randomized to the intervention reported significantly more physical activity at follow-up relative to controls. Results failed to confirm the role of family factors as mediators of the effect of the intervention on physical activity. When gender was considered as a moderator, it appeared that parental monitoring was strongly and positively correlated with physical activity for girls, but not for boys. While the mechanism by which the Family Check-Up leads to increased physical activity remains unclear, its robust effects suggest that family intervention can be used to promote physical activity and might therefore have further-reaching health benefits.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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The acceptability, feasibility, and preliminary effects of a cognitive behavioral skills building intervention in adolescents with chronic daily headaches

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ABSTRACT Approximately 3.5% of adolescents in the United States have chronic daily headache (CDH). Chronic daily headaches in adolescents are often refractory to the adult pharmacological interventions. And as a

ABSTRACT Approximately 3.5% of adolescents in the United States have chronic daily headache (CDH). Chronic daily headaches in adolescents are often refractory to the adult pharmacological interventions. And as a result, adolescents typically experience increased levels of stress, which exacerbates their headaches. Chronic daily headaches negatively impact both the adolescent and their family. Adolescents with CDHs frequently exemplify comorbid psychiatric symptoms such as anxiety, depression, and increased risk for suicide. Risk factors for CDH in adolescents have been well studied; however, few studies have focused on psychologically based interventions to enhance effective coping, positive mental health, and pain relief in this group of teens. Given the paucity of psychologically focused interventions in this group, further research is necessary to test and develop the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral skills building (CBSB) interventions. This pilot study focused on the use of a CBSB intervention that emphasized problem solving, cue recognition, effective communication, behavior modeling, cognitive reappraisal, stress management, effective coping, and positive thinking. A randomized controlled trial pilot study was conducted. The intervention group received a seven-week intervention focused on CBSB techniques and headache education, while the comparison headache education group received a seven-week program focused on basic headache hygiene measures (e.g., adequate sleep, adequate hydration, dietary triggers, environmental triggers). The total sample included 32 adolescents inclusive of the ages 13 and 17 years. Paired t-tests resulted in significant preliminary positive effects for COPE-HEP on anxiety, depression, beliefs, headache disability, headache frequency, and headache duration. Comparison group education resulted in significant preliminary positive effects on anxiety, depression, headache disability, headache frequency, headache pain level, headache duration, and medication frequency. There were no significant changes over time in means of parent perception of pain interference for both groups. Independent t-tests revealed that COPE-HEP teens had significantly less anxiety and headache duration at post-intervention. The acceptability of the COPE-HEP intervention with adolescents with CDHs in a specialty care setting is supported by this study, while the feasibility of conducting this study in a specialty care setting is partially supported. These findings support a need to refine the intervention and test both its short and long-term effects in a full-scale randomized controlled trial with adolescents who have CDHs.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Effects of an acute bout of aerobic exercise on motor performance, executive function and intrinsic motivation in adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome

Description

The benefits of exercise have been recommended in typical and other special populations. However, the evidence for persons with Down syndrome (DS) is still limited. This study was aimed at

The benefits of exercise have been recommended in typical and other special populations. However, the evidence for persons with Down syndrome (DS) is still limited. This study was aimed at investigating the impact of an acute bout of aerobic exercise intervention on motor performance, executive function and intrinsic motivation in adolescents and young adults with DS. Ten participants with DS were assigned to an exercise group, who walked on a incremental treadmill protocol for 20 minutes. The exercise intensity was achieved at 66% of their predicted maximum heart rate. Another ten participants with DS were assigned to an attentional control group, who watched a video for 20 minutes. Measures of fine manual dexterity (e.g., Purdue Pegboard test), manual force production (e.g., grip strength test), processing speed (e.g., visual choice reaction time test), verbal processing (e.g., verbal fluency test), attention shifting ability (e.g., The Dimensional Card sorting test), and inhibitory control (e.g., Knock and Tap test) were tested pre and post intervention. An intrinsic motivation scale (e.g., enjoyment and effort) was conducted after the intervention. First, results showed participants significantly improved their performance in manual force production and Knock and Tap Test after the exercise intervention. While it has been proposed that exercise increases arousal status, neurotransmitters, or cerebral vasculature, the exact mechanisms in persons with DS are still unknown. However, our results showed that after treadmill walking, motor and cognitive improvements can be found in individuals with DS, even in a single exercise session. In addition, participants reported higher scores in enjoyment after video viewing than exercise, which may a result from musical effect or too much emphasis on external rewards in their early participation in exercise. These may imply that participants had low intrinsic motivation to an active lifestyle. Further, scores in effort were significantly higher after exercise than video viewing, which indicated their capabilities to perceive their physical exertion. However, other motivational regulations (e.g., introjected and identified regulations) have shown the relationship with exercise behavior in this population. Thus, further study should consider divergent motivational factors in order to implement an effective exercise program.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Journey to wellness: a health portfolio for adolescents

Description

Adolescents and their parents have a unique opportunity to learn from one another and encourage mutual pursuit of a healthy lifestyle. Discussing beneficial habits and how to ensure wellness are

Adolescents and their parents have a unique opportunity to learn from one another and encourage mutual pursuit of a healthy lifestyle. Discussing beneficial habits and how to ensure wellness are uncommon topics for student consideration in the classroom and seldom included in education programs developed to assist parents. The purpose of this project is to identify important health concerns for decision making by adolescents. Each topic is presented in a manner that enables students to explore their personal risk factors, gain knowledge through individual surveys, set personal goals, promote conversation with parents and peers, and provide online resources that foster understanding. The protocol includes a statement of the problem; recent statistical information regarding each of the topics, commonly used tools for goal setting, relevant web sites, and questions to promote interaction. These collective sources of guidance are intended to support good health practices, empower students to make wise healthy choices about self-care, and promote reciprocal learning between adolescents and their parents.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2010