Matching Items (4)

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Triple sampling an application to a 14b 10 MS/s cyclic converter

Description

Semiconductor device scaling has kept up with Moore's law for the past decades and they have been scaling by a factor of half every one and half years. Every new

Semiconductor device scaling has kept up with Moore's law for the past decades and they have been scaling by a factor of half every one and half years. Every new generation of device technology opens up new opportunities and challenges and especially so for analog design. High speed and low gain is characteristic of these processes and hence a tradeoff that can enable to get back gain by trading speed is crucial. This thesis proposes a solution that increases the speed of sampling of a circuit by a factor of three while reducing the specifications on analog blocks and keeping the power nearly constant. The techniques are based on the switched capacitor technique called Correlated Level Shifting. A triple channel Cyclic ADC has been implemented, with each channel working at a sampling frequency of 3.33MS/s and a resolution of 14 bits. The specifications are compared with that based on a traditional architecture to show the superiority of the proposed technique.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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A 1.2V 25MSPS pipelined ADC using split CLS with Op-amp sharing

Description

ABSTRACT As the technology length shrinks down, achieving higher gain is becoming very difficult in deep sub-micron technologies. As the supply voltages drop, cascodes are very difficult to implement and

ABSTRACT As the technology length shrinks down, achieving higher gain is becoming very difficult in deep sub-micron technologies. As the supply voltages drop, cascodes are very difficult to implement and cascade amplifiers are needed to achieve sufficient gain with required output swing. This sets the fundamental limit on the SNR and hence the maximum resolution that can be achieved by ADC. With the RSD algorithm and the range overlap, the sub ADC can tolerate large comparator offsets leaving the linearity and accuracy requirement for the DAC and residue gain stage. Typically, the multiplying DAC requires high gain wide bandwidth op-amp and the design of this high gain op-amp becomes challenging in the deep submicron technologies. This work presents `A 12 bit 25MSPS 1.2V pipelined ADC using split CLS technique' in IBM 130nm 8HP process using only CMOS devices for the application of Large Hadron Collider (LHC). CLS technique relaxes the gain requirement of op-amp and improves the signal-to-noise ratio without increase in power or input sampling capacitor with rail-to-rail swing. An op-amp sharing technique has been incorporated with split CLS technique which decreases the number of op-amps and hence the power further. Entire pipelined converter has been implemented as six 2.5 bit RSD stages and hence decreases the latency associated with the pipelined architecture - one of the main requirements for LHC along with the power requirement. Two different OTAs have been designed to use in the split-CLS technique. Bootstrap switches and pass gate switches are used in the circuit along with a low power dynamic kick-back compensated comparator.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Adaptive signal to noise ratio scalable analog front-end continuous time sigma delta converter for digital hearing aids

Description

A dual-channel directional digital hearing aid (DHA) front end using Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) microphones and an adaptive-power analog processing signal chain is presented. The analog front end consists

A dual-channel directional digital hearing aid (DHA) front end using Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) microphones and an adaptive-power analog processing signal chain is presented. The analog front end consists of a double differential amplifier (DDA) based capacitance to voltage conversion circuit, 40dB variable gain amplifier (VGA) and a continuous time sigma delta analog to digital converter (CT - ΣΔ ADC). Adaptive power scaling of the 4th order CT - ΣΔ achieves 68dB SNR at 120μW, which can be scaled down to 61dB SNR at 67μW. This power saving will increse the battery life of the DHA.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2010

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Design of a continuous time sigma delta analog-to-digital converter for operation in extreme environments

Description

In this work, a high resolution analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for use in harsh environments is presented. The ADC is implemented in bulk CMOS technology and is intended for space exploration,

In this work, a high resolution analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for use in harsh environments is presented. The ADC is implemented in bulk CMOS technology and is intended for space exploration, mining and automotive applications with a range of temperature variation in excess of 250°C. A continuous time (CT) sigma delta modulator employing a cascade of integrators with feed forward (CIFF) architecture in a single feedback loop topology is used for implementing the ADC. In order to enable operation in the intended application environments, an RC time constant tuning engine is proposed. The tuning engine is used to maintain linearity of a 10 ksps 20 bit continuous time sigma delta ADC designed for spectroscopy applications in space. The proposed circuit which is based on master slave architecture automatically selects on chip resistors to control RC time constants to an accuracy range of ±5% to ±1%. The tuning range, tuning accuracy and circuit non-idealities are analyzed theoretically. To verify the concept, an experimental chip was fabricated in JAZZ .18µm 1.8V CMOS technology. The tuning engine which occupies an area of .065mm2; consists of only an integrator, a comparator and a shift register. It can achieve a signal to noise and distortion ratio (SNDR) greater than 120dB over a ±40% tuning range.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011