Matching Items (23)

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Advancing the New American University through innovative practices in the development of Barrett, The Honors College

Description

Barrett, The Honors College at Arizona State University (ASU) serves as a universal role model for organizing the resources of an institution to support highly motivated and prepared students. In

Barrett, The Honors College at Arizona State University (ASU) serves as a universal role model for organizing the resources of an institution to support highly motivated and prepared students. In 2009, Barrett, The Honors College (Barrett) opened the nation's first purposefully designed undergraduate honors residential college campus. Given the current demand by other American higher education institutions who wish to better understand how Barrett emerged as a distinct and singular model for an honors residential college experience, this action research study explores the effectiveness of the decisions, execution and outcomes central to Barrett's development. Five senior administrators of college units or universities were interviewed and provided insight for constructing a design for how other honors programs and colleges can learn from the challenges and accomplishments presented in developing an honors college for the 21st century while replicating Barrett's success. The study is framed in the overall context of how Barrett actualizes the New American University at ASU in meeting the demand for producing students that can compete in a global marketplace.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Social identity and the shift of student affairs staff to the academic unit

Description

This study explored the phenomenon of student affairs professionals working at Arizona State University who shifted from a student affairs unit to perform similar work in an academic unit. The

This study explored the phenomenon of student affairs professionals working at Arizona State University who shifted from a student affairs unit to perform similar work in an academic unit. The conceptual framework for this exploration was social identity theory (Tajfel, 1974), which asserts that individuals develop a self-concept or image that derives, in part, from her/his membership in a group or groups. This qualitative study utilized in-person interviews to capture raw data from four purposeful participants, and a software package (NVivo 9) aided in the grounded theory approach to data analysis (Charmaz, 2006). The study found that participants placed a high value on the college-centric approach to their student affairs work, but they still identified as student affairs professionals working inside the academic unit. Findings are useful to: supervisors who have an interest in the professional development and personal well-being of staff; faculty and administrators of master's and doctoral degree programs designed to prepare student affairs professionals; associations that serve student affairs professionals; higher education leaders engaged in organizational change; and higher education administrators interested in the roles of individual biases and values in organizations. This study will interest student affairs professionals making the shift from a student affairs unit to an academic unit, and it will inform the researcher's own practice and career development through his investigation of his own organization.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Novel approaches to increasing stair use in a university population

Description

Research indicates that adults are not acquiring enough physical activity. Increasing the use of stairs is an accessible way to weave high intensity physical activity into the daily routine. The

Research indicates that adults are not acquiring enough physical activity. Increasing the use of stairs is an accessible way to weave high intensity physical activity into the daily routine. The purpose of this study is to test the effect of four environmental changes on ascending stair use in a mixed population of college students, faulty, and staff on a southwest college campus. The study design included a 10-week time series design with alternating baseline and intervention phases, including a directional cue represented by footprints on the ground, a positive prompt, a deterrent prompt and a combination phase. Data was collected with both an in-person tally and a video recording device. The study included 6,140 observations and coded variables included stair use, sex, number of bags carried, temperature, and volume. Rater reliability ranged from .81 to 1.0. Multivariate logistic regression was used to perform the statistic analysis. Stair use increased significantly from Washout 1 and the positive prompting phase with a 7% absolute increase and an odds ratio of 1.35 (95% CI 1.080-1.696). Stair use during the footprint phase, deterrent phase and combination phase did not increase significantly compared to the previous baseline or washout phases. Day of the week (Monday=reference, Tuesday CI=1.626, 95% CI 1.298-2.011, Wednesday OR=0.457, 95% CI 0.248-0.841, Thursday OR=1.434, 95% CI 1.164-1.766), sex (OR=1.376, 95% CI 1.173-1.613) and volume (OR=1.007, 95% CI 1.005-1.008) were significantly correlated to stair use. Women used the stairs more than men and higher volume situations were related to increased stair use. Temperature and baggage number were not related to stair use. The results of this study indicate that positive prompting with an environmental message theme is an effective method to increase stair use in a university setting.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Enrollment management in academic units

Description

This study provides an understanding of how administrative leaders make decisions regarding enrollment management within academic units at a major research university in the southwestern United States. Key enrollment management

This study provides an understanding of how administrative leaders make decisions regarding enrollment management within academic units at a major research university in the southwestern United States. Key enrollment management functions of recruiting, admissions, marketing, orientation, financial aid/scholarships, academic advising, student engagement, retention and career services were identified from the literature. Typically applied at the institutional level, this study provides an understanding of how leaders in academic units decide to implement enrollment management. A case study was conducted using qualitative data collection methods which emphasized interviews. Senior administrators, such as associate deans within academic units who have responsibility for enrollment management, served as the sample. Three main theoretical constructs were derived after analysis of the data: Theoretical Construct 1: To meet enrollment and retention goals, leaders strategically plan structures and manage resources for enrollment management functions in their academic units. Theoretical Construct 2: To increase retention, leaders intentionally strive to develop a sense of community through customized programs and services for students in their academic units. Theoretical Construct 3: To achieve enrollment objectives within a school-centric model, leaders build relationships with centralized enrollment management functions and other academic units. The discussion and analysis of the study suggests that academic units follow a similar evolutionary model to institutions as they develop enrollment management functions. Five recommendations on how leaders in academic units can more strategically utilize enrollment management principles in decision making are offered.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Dissertation influences and processes: Ed.D. vs. A.B.D

Description

ABSTRACT

This study identified the influences and processes of the dissertation completers, currently enrolled students, and non-completers of four cohorts (59 participants) in the Ed.D. administration program.

ABSTRACT

This study identified the influences and processes of the dissertation completers, currently enrolled students, and non-completers of four cohorts (59 participants) in the Ed.D. administration program. The research questions sought answers as to why some students completed their dissertations and why some did not, the processes in completing a dissertation, and what should be included in a doctoral guide for completing the dissertation. The participants of this study were Ed.D. administration doctoral students in the field of educational leadership from a southwestern university. The job titles of the participants ranged from teacher to superintendent. The participants started the three-year doctoral program in the years 2004, 2005, 2006, or 2007. They were between the ages of 24 and 63. Survey Monkey provided the opportunity to request answers to different questions depending on the dissertation status—enrollee, completer, or non-completer.

This study entailed interviewing seven doctoral completers, five enrollees, and four non

completers. The significance of this mixed method study was to compare influences and

processes to determine suggestions for a study guide that could be used by future doctoral students, chairs, programs, and universities to help students complete their dissertations and become successful graduates. Recommendations are made (a) to recruit more African Americans and men into doctoral programs and the education field; (b) non-completers be invited to finish their dissertations with interventions and an accountable chair; (c) chairs provide his or her best help to meet the student half-way; (d) the department and university provide accountability measures and incentives for both the student and the chair; and (e) provide specific lessons that include finding a topic, researching a topic, and interacting with the chair; and (f) it was determined that non-completers were not timid as suggested in the literature but were found to have either changed their desire or fulfilled their desire by obtaining a promotion. In summary, a nurturing chair and a strong support system were found to be two major factors in determining the difference between doctoral completion and non-completion.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Rationales shaping international linkages in higher education: a qualitative case study of the ASU-ITESM strategic alliance

Description

This qualitative case study examines the rationales of the relationship between Arizona State University (ASU)--an American public research university--and Tecnologico de Monterrey (ITESM), a Mexican private not for profit research

This qualitative case study examines the rationales of the relationship between Arizona State University (ASU)--an American public research university--and Tecnologico de Monterrey (ITESM), a Mexican private not for profit research university. The focus of the study is to document the different meanings participants attached to the rationales of this international inter-university relationship. The conceptual framework draws from internationalization of higher education and interpretive policy analysis literature. Qualitative methodologies were utilized in both data collection and analysis. Data consisted of institutional policy documents, a ranking survey, and semi-structured interviews with faculty, administrators, and senior leadership from both universities. This study demonstrates that the rationales of the ASU-ITESM relationship are complex and dynamic. They have a function (e.g., declared, interpreted, enacted) and meanings attached (e.g., type, scope, and priority). Declared rationales were expressed in an ideal state in institutional policy. Those were interpreted by the participants according to their individual sense-making framework, thus becoming the interpreted rationales. Participants acted upon such understandings; these enacted rationales refer to the real rationales shaping the inter-university relationship. Findings also show there were three different categories of meanings participants attached to rationales, based on their type, scope and priority. In terms of type, rationales took the form of values, interests and needs, or expected benefits; they can also be academic, economic, political, or social/cultural. In scope, rationales are broad or specific addressing the relationship overall or specific initiatives within; they target individual, organizational, or societal levels. As for priority, participants interpreted and acted upon rationales with high, moderate or low importance influenced by their job position (e.g., faculty, administrators, senior leadership).

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Women in student service roles: self-authorship and early career experiences

Description

Most research on the experience of young women in student service roles in higher education is focused on a reflection of the early career experiences of mid and senior level

Most research on the experience of young women in student service roles in higher education is focused on a reflection of the early career experiences of mid and senior level professionals. Young women enter the field with a set of expectations about the work and their early career experiences need to be uncovered in order to better understand what they expect from their roles in student services. This study focused on the experience of young women in student services and the dynamics they identify as being significant to their work experience. Six women in their mid-twenties working in student service roles participated in two dialogic interviews regarding their work experience. Findings from these women's stories suggest that women are aware of internal and external dynamics that shaped their work experience, and are engaged in their journey toward Self-Authorship along intrapersonal and interpersonal dimensions. Specifically, the women actively chose their career path, looked for opportunities to develop their professional cache, and were impacted by their relationships with their supervisors and colleagues. The women are interested in their professional development in student services in higher education and are active in shaping the experience to meet their expectations. The findings suggest that to understand the experience of young women in student service roles in higher education, women should be asked to share their stories on their early career experiences, including interactions with supervisors and other professional colleagues. By representing these voices in the dialogue on the experience of young women in student service roles, the dynamics that shaped those experiences can be better understood.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Faculty perspectives on critical pedagogy and social justice

Description

In an attempt to gain a greater understanding of the interpretations and attitudes of higher education faculty in education programs teaching critical pedagogy, social justice, student empowerment and related concepts

In an attempt to gain a greater understanding of the interpretations and attitudes of higher education faculty in education programs teaching critical pedagogy, social justice, student empowerment and related concepts I conducted interviews with twenty faculty members in education programs in the New York City area. It is a study looking at the philosophies and conceptions of faculty and the relationship between those philosophies and their actions in the classroom. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed for trends and patterns. The nature of the questions focused on various aspects of critical pedagogy and allowed for an easy transition to preliminary categories based on the interview questions. The data was reviewed again for similarities and trends, and then again for comparison between the three identified perspectives: Professionalization Perspective, Democratic Student Development Perspective, and Critical Action Perspective.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Presenting ASU's ethos: Old Main as a seat of argument

Description

Scholarship on the rhetoric of place and space provides ample precedent for the study of structures as rhetorical texts; real and imagined places which convey meaning or memory, particularly monuments,

Scholarship on the rhetoric of place and space provides ample precedent for the study of structures as rhetorical texts; real and imagined places which convey meaning or memory, particularly monuments, memorials, and museums have been extensively studied, but loci of identity and history in institutions of higher education are under- examined. The following analysis of Arizona State University's Old Main building seeks to fill a gap in the study of place and space. As an entity which produces its own powerful discourses, Arizona State University expresses its historicity and institutional goals through varied and numerous media, but Old Main is one of the most critical, for the structure acts as an ethical proof in ASU's argument for its character, endurance, and worth. This examination addresses how ASU's ethos is articulated through the experiences of Old Main's past and current users, the instructional historical texts and artifacts displayed in the structure, the way that the building is mediated by ASU discourses, and the agency of the edifice itself. This work endeavors to answer Henri Lefebvre's call to improve widespread understanding of spaces as texts and their dialogue with users, and builds on the work of Carol Blair, Richard P. Dober, Diane Favro, and Bruno Latour, as well as that of Henri Lefebvre. To provide full context, this analysis integrates scholarship from the disciplines of campus planning, architecture, classical rhetoric, and the rhetoric of place and space.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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The impact of a workplace environmental change on work-related outcomes: productivity, presenteeism and cognition

Description

The purpose of this study was to examine whether a workplace environmental intervention would improve work-related outcomes including productivity, presenteeism and cognition. The secondary aim was to investigate whether work-related

The purpose of this study was to examine whether a workplace environmental intervention would improve work-related outcomes including productivity, presenteeism and cognition. The secondary aim was to investigate whether work-related outcomes are correlated to observed changes in sitting time, physical activity, and sleep. The study was introduced as part of a naturalistic environmental change in which university staff and faculty were relocated into a new building (n=23). The comparison group consisted of university staff within the same college with no imminent plans to re-locate during the intervention period; there were no environmental changes to this workplace (n =10). Participants wore two behavioral monitoring devices, activPAL and GeneActiv, for 7 consecutive days at two time points (immediately prior and 16 weeks following the office relocation). Measures of productivity and presenteeism were obtained via four validated questionnaires and participants underwent cognitive performance testing. Baseline adjusted analysis of covariance statistical analyses were used to examine differences between groups in work-related outcomes. A residual analysis in regression was conducted to determine the differences between observed changes in sitting time, physical activity and sleep, and work-related outcomes. The results showed that a reduction in work hour sitting time was not detrimental to work related outcomes. Decreased sitting was observed to potentially improve presenteeism and absenteeism. Additionally, physical activity was shown to modestly improve productivity, presenteeism and absenteeism. Poor sleep patterns were associated with work impairment and increased absenteeism.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014