Matching Items (161)

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Creating the Prison-to-College Pipeline An Examination of the Educational Experiences of Formerly Incarcerated Women

Description

The United States accounts for only 4% of the world’s female population, but it is home to more than 30% of the world’s incarcerated women, the majority of whom will

The United States accounts for only 4% of the world’s female population, but it is home to more than 30% of the world’s incarcerated women, the majority of whom will eventually attempt a successful reentry into society. Almost half of the incarcerated women in the United States have not obtained a high school diploma or equivalency, and only 31% have attempted some college, compared to 58% among the general public (Ewert & Wildhagen, 2011). There is ample evidence of the impact of a post-secondary degree on reducing recidivism and increasing reentry success. However, the Arizona Department of Corrections reports that of the more than 40,000 people incarcerated in November of 2019, only 5,333, or 12.5%, were involved in any type of educational programming while incarcerated (2019).

Few studies have looked closely at the barriers to higher education for formerly incarcerated individuals, and even fewer have focused on women. The purpose of this qualitative action research study was to examine the educational experiences of formerly incarcerated women through the lenses of critical social theory (Freeman & Vasconcelos, 2010; Freire, 1970) and possible selves theory (Markus & Nurius, 1986) in an effort to more fully understand low educational attainment in this population and use this knowledge to develop an effective, participant-informed intervention and provide recommendations for university outreach programs. Study participants were formerly incarcerated women and individuals who work with this population. Data were collected from in-depth semi-structured interviews and materials created during the College After Prison Workshop which was developed for this project.

Interviews revealed that the women in this study crave a sense of belonging, feel regret over their lost possible selves, experience a fear of standing still or going backward, and have a strong desire to help others. Findings suggest that colleges and universities can support formerly incarcerated women in the post-secondary system by curating a community of scholars and demonstrating a clear path forward for formerly incarcerated women by reducing systemic barriers.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Family Engagement in a Teacher Preparation Program

Description

There are many benefits for children, teachers, families, and schools when partnerships are formed between families and teachers. However, many new teachers are entering the teaching profession not feeling confident

There are many benefits for children, teachers, families, and schools when partnerships are formed between families and teachers. However, many new teachers are entering the teaching profession not feeling confident about communicating and engaging with parents. This lack of confidence stems from some teacher preparation programs not including curriculum that explicitly addresses how to communicate and engage with parents. The focus of this study was to investigate the extent to which four Family Engagement Trainings affected preservice teachers during their student teaching practicum. A quasi-experimental approach using an explanatory sequential mixed method action research design was used to measure changes in preservice teachers’ knowledge, value, and self-efficacy regarding communicating and engaging with parents throughout the 19 weeks of the study. A survey instrument, personal meaning maps, and reflections were used to gather data. Results indicated the Family Engagement Trainings were effective in positively changing the preservice teachers’ knowledge, value, and self-efficacy to communicate and engage with families.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Called to Serve Local and Global Communities: How Internationalization at Public Research Universities Differs with Varying Levels of Publicness

Description

Universities have played a key, but often understudied, role in international development throughtechnical assistance, the education of international students and the research of critical global issues (Morgan, 1979; BIFAD, 2011).

Universities have played a key, but often understudied, role in international development throughtechnical assistance, the education of international students and the research of critical global issues (Morgan, 1979; BIFAD, 2011). Understanding internationalization in higher education can help uncover nuances of the role that United States (U.S.) universities play in U.S. international development efforts. This paper seeks to answer: “How do internationalization activities differ in public research universities with varying levels of publicness?” The study follows multicase qualitative methodology and a framework from Horn et al. to collect data on 5 dimensions of internationalization, students, scholars, research orientation, curriculum content and organizational support, to compare internationalization at four U.S. public research universities with varying levels of state funding and state change (2007). Case selection is grounded on dimensional publicness theory to provide a theoretical foundation for the variables used: level of state appropriations and percent change of state appropriations. Through a purposeful case selection process, four U.S. public research intensive universities with similar size, endowment and research activity were selected. Results showed that all universities have internationalization efforts across all dimensions but nuances exist in how internationalization is actualized at institutions. Cases with low state funding differed noticeably in student and research characteristics but did not differ in curricular and organizational support. Differences across cases can be explained by an economic rationale for the need to subsidize state budget cuts with full- paying international students and increased research grants. Similarities can be explained by other non-economic rationales that may insulate curriculum and organizational support from budgetary costs. While results demonstrate a clear commitment to internationalization, further research will need to be conducted to determine if results hold true against a dramatic shift in world events since 2017 which include a rise in nationalism, a global pandemic and decrease global standing of the United States.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Equity in Action: Estimating the Association Between Funding, Expenditures, Tuition, and Affirmative Action Case Law on Enrollment and Completion Rates at Selective Colleges

Description

I conduct a series of analyses aimed at assessing equity in selective American colleges over a 20+ year time frame. My main measures of equity are enrollment and completion

I conduct a series of analyses aimed at assessing equity in selective American colleges over a 20+ year time frame. My main measures of equity are enrollment and completion in selective colleges, which I disaggregate by race/ethnicity. After creating an institutional-level panel data set with variables on college revenues and expenses, tuition, institutional control, and affirmative action case law decisions, I estimate a Generalized Least Squares (GLS) model with institutional level random fixed effects to identify factors associated with enrollment and degree completion for white and non-white students at selective United States colleges. My results suggest that affirmative action case law is associated with changes in enrollment and degree completion rates of white and non-white student alike. Increasing equity for non-white students does not compromise equity for white students. There was a statistically significant relationship between federal spending, enrollment, and degree completion for non-white students. When selective colleges increased tuition, instructional costs, academic support services expenditures, and student support services, Asian American/Pacific Islander students were likely to see enrollment and degree completion declines. Degree completion and enrollment differences were observed for Asian American/Pacific Islander, Hispanic, and white students at public, private and for-profit colleges. In the years after the Adams and Hopwood court decisions, equity for non-white students declined at selective colleges. Enrollment and degree completion for non-white students increased following Grutter, Gratz, Coalition, and Fisher decisions. Enrollment of white students increased following Fordice and Hopwood. Degree completion for white students increased post Coalition and decreased post Fisher.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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A case study on the processes of academic advising in a school-centric environment

Description

This study examined the processes of academic advisement in a school-centric university environment utilizing the O'Banion Model of Academic Advising (1972) as a baseline for theoretical comparison. The primary research

This study examined the processes of academic advisement in a school-centric university environment utilizing the O'Banion Model of Academic Advising (1972) as a baseline for theoretical comparison. The primary research question sought to explore if the O'Banion Model of Academic Advising, a dominant theory of advisement processes, was still representative of and present in contemporary advisement. A qualitative case study methodology was utilized to explore the lived experiences of professional staff academic advisors in the academic advisement process. Eleven professional staff advisors were interviewed for up to 90 minutes each about their lived experience in providing academic advisement services. A structured series of questions were asked about the academic advisors' experiences with the process and their daily advisement activities. The participants were asked how the vision, mission, philosophies, and structures of the institution impacted their role and responsibilities in the advisement process. Mixed results were found over the presence of the O'Banion Model in contemporary advisement. The results revealed significant additional workloads, unique structures, and complex roles as a result of the institution's school-centric philosophy. Role ambiguity and confusion over responsibility for the advisement process were found.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Corporate mentors and undergraduate students: a qualitative study of the Advancing Women in Construction Mentorship Program

Description

In a conscious effort to combat the low enrollment of women in construction management, a program was created to retain women through a mentorship program - Advancing Women in Construction.

In a conscious effort to combat the low enrollment of women in construction management, a program was created to retain women through a mentorship program - Advancing Women in Construction. A qualitative analysis, facilitated through a grounded theory approach, sought to understand if the program was indeed successful, and what value did the students derive from the programs and participating in the mentoring process.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Fostering Creative Compassion in Honors Students Through Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and Mindfulness

Description

This quasi-experimental, concurrent, mixed method, action research study sought to evaluate how an elective 1-credit course informed by mindfulness and culturally sustaining pedagogy influenced honors students’ academic self-efficacy, self-compassion, and

This quasi-experimental, concurrent, mixed method, action research study sought to evaluate how an elective 1-credit course informed by mindfulness and culturally sustaining pedagogy influenced honors students’ academic self-efficacy, self-compassion, and their meaning-making about what it means to be an honors student. Theoretical perspectives and research guiding the study included: academic self-efficacy, culturally sustaining pedagogy, mindfulness, and third space. Drawing from these perspectives, the 9-week Creative Compassion course utilized poetry and rap as a way to enact culturally sustaining pedagogy and also as a vehicle for students to practice mindfulness. Findings from quantitative data from pre- and post- surveys of a treatment and control population, as well as qualitative data (open-ended survey questions, focus groups, and student artifacts) from the treatment population are presented here. This study revealed the following: practices informed by culturally sustaining pedagogy positively impacted students’ mindfulness, these same practices allowed for the creation of a third space within the classroom, and improving student self-compassion should be an increased priority. Additional implications for research and practice are also presented.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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University Club Advising: Learning and Connecting Through Formal Practices

Description

This mixed methods action research study closely examines what Club Advisors need in order to be successful in their role, develops an intervention that supports Club Advisors in skill-building along

This mixed methods action research study closely examines what Club Advisors need in order to be successful in their role, develops an intervention that supports Club Advisors in skill-building along with Club Advisor’s self-motivation and the development of self-efficacy in their role. The purpose of this study was to understand what skills and motivations Club Advisors had and after an intervention occurred, observing whether their self-efficacy around club advising increased. While there has been growth in the area of student affairs and focus on student involvement outside of the classroom, there is currently limited research in the field of university Club Advising as the resources exist informally. The formal literature which does exist does not agree on what skills are needed to be a Club Advisor and does not bridge the gap between theory and practice. The lack of formal research on Club Advising impacts the student experience through Club Advisors not receiving the resources they need. Ensuring the Club Advisors who do volunteer their time are set-up to develop their students successfully requires additional research. This research study used surveys, interviews, memos, and workshop interventions to understand where Club Advisors were developmentally and how to develop them further. Club Advisors in the study wanted to use the resources and connect with others, but before this study did not know how or where to connect. Future cycles of research beyond this study would expand upon the findings and create a foundation for Club Advisor development.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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How PA Programs Successfully Promote Diversity in Admissions

Description

More underrepresented minority (URM) healthcare professionals are needed to improve health equity. Although holistic review in admissions has the potential to increase URM participation in health professions, recent data suggest

More underrepresented minority (URM) healthcare professionals are needed to improve health equity. Although holistic review in admissions has the potential to increase URM participation in health professions, recent data suggest that its impact varies substantially. The purpose of the dissertation research described here was to identify interventions to increase diversity among healthcare professionals and explore holistic review use in physician assistant (PA) program admissions to advance understanding of effective practices. PA programs were selected as an important prototype for exploratory studies since the extent of holistic review use in PA programs was unknown; at the same time, URM representation among PA students has decreased over the last 15 years.

A critical review of the literature revealed that various holistic review practices have been used by several health professions programs to successfully increase URM enrollment and that organizational culture may be a factor that promotes success. Following this, 2017 Physician Assistant Education Association survey data were analyzed to assess the frequency of holistic review in PA programs and examine its association with URM matriculation. Results from 221 of the 223 PA programs accredited at the time showed that 77.5% used holistic review, and its use modestly correlated with proportion of first-year students identified as ethnic minorities (rs = .20, p < .01). Of particular interest, some programs using holistic review had substantially higher proportions of URM students than others. This finding laid the foundation for a qualitative multiple case study to explore the role of organizational culture as a hypothesized antecedent to effective holistic admissions processes.

Survey study responses were used to select two PA program ‘cases’ that met criteria consistent with a proposed conceptual framework linking organizational culture that values diversity (or ‘diversity culture’) to holistic admissions associated with high URM enrollment. Directed content analysis of data revealed that diversity culture appears to be a strong driver of practices that support enrolling diverse classes of students.

Overall, this mixed methods program of research advances understanding of holistic review, its utility, and the influence of organizational culture. The research generated important insights with ramifications for current practice and future studies within PA and across health professions programs.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Faculty and Staff Perception of Their Role in Student Success

Description

ABSTRACT

Faculty and staff can create barriers by not understanding their role in student success. This study began with an artifact analysis of 20 documents to better understand how

ABSTRACT

Faculty and staff can create barriers by not understanding their role in student success. This study began with an artifact analysis of 20 documents to better understand how faculty and staff at Concordia University Texas were operationalizing student success. The results of the artifact analysis showed a lack of recorded dialogue around student success at regular business meetings, as well as pattern of deficit language approach to policy and procedure in the student handbooks Next, this study evaluated the impacts of using a Community of Practice as a change agent to help faculty and staff better understand their roles in student success and specifically to establish a definition of student success. Using a mixed method, action research approach, results showed that the Community of Practice was successful in terms of transfer or knowledge and creating a sense of purpose for participants regarding their role in student success. Results showed that participating in a Community of Practice was successful in helping faculty and staff not only understand their own role in student success, but understand their place among others in the unified goal to help students succeed. The Community of Practice participants completed the research with a better understanding of how and why collaborating with different departments enables faculty and staff to better help students. Additionally, the participants concluded that a visual reminder of student success (figurines, students stories, student pictures) ensured that student success was the first thing they thought about when completing their daily work.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020