Matching Items (12)

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Ion transport in surface modified cylindrical silicon-on-insulator nanopore with field effect modulation

Description

Solid-state nanopore research, used in the field of biomolecule detection and separation, has developed rapidly during the last decade. An electric field generated from the nanopore membrane to the aperture

Solid-state nanopore research, used in the field of biomolecule detection and separation, has developed rapidly during the last decade. An electric field generated from the nanopore membrane to the aperture surface by a bias voltage can be used to electrostatically control the transport of charges. This results in ionic current rectification that can be used for applications such as biomolecule filtration and DNA sequencing.

In this doctoral research, a voltage bias was applied on the device silicon layer of Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) cylindrical single nanopore to analyze how the perpendicular gate electrical field affected the ionic current through the pore. The nanopore was fabricated using electron beam lithography (EBL) and reactive ion etching (RIE) which are standard CMOS processes and can be integrated into any electronic circuit with massive production. The long cylindrical pore shape provides a larger surface area inside the aperture compared to other nanopores whose surface charge is of vital importance to ion transport.

Ionic transport through the nanopore was characterized by measuring the ionic conductance of the nanopore in aqueous hydrochloric acid and potassium chloride solutions under field effect modulation. The nanopores were separately coated with negatively charged thermal silicon oxide and positively charged aluminum oxide using Atomic Layer Deposition. Both layers worked as electrical insulation layers preventing leakage current once the substrate bias was applied. Different surface charges also provided different counterion-coion configurations. The transverse conductance of the nanopore at low electrolyte concentrations (<10-4 M) changed with voltage bias when the Debye length was comparable to the dimensions of the nanopore.

Ionic transport through nanopores coated with polyelectrolyte (PE) brushes were also investigated in ionic solutions with various pH values using Electrochemical Impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The pH sensitive poly[2–(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) PE brushes were integrated on the inner walls as well as the surface of the thermal oxidized SOI cylindrical nanopore using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). An equivalent circuit model was developed to extract conductive and resistive values of the nanopore in ionic solutions. The ionic conductance of PE coated nanopore was effectively rectified by varying the pH and gate bias.

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Date Created
  • 2015

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Electrical and thermal transport in alternative device technologies

Description

The goal of this research work is to develop a particle-based device simulator for modeling strained silicon devices. Two separate modules had to be developed for that purpose: A generic

The goal of this research work is to develop a particle-based device simulator for modeling strained silicon devices. Two separate modules had to be developed for that purpose: A generic bulk Monte Carlo simulation code which in the long-time limit solves the Boltzmann transport equation for electrons; and an extension to this code that solves for the bulk properties of strained silicon. One scattering table is needed for conventional silicon, whereas, because of the strain breaking the symmetry of the system, three scattering tables are needed for modeling strained silicon material. Simulation results for the average drift velocity and the average electron energy are in close agreement with published data. A Monte Carlo device simulation tool has also been employed to integrate the effects of self-heating into device simulation for Silicon on Insulator devices. The effects of different types of materials for buried oxide layers have been studied. Sapphire, Aluminum Nitride (AlN), Silicon dioxide (SiO2) and Diamond have been used as target materials of interest in the analysis and the effects of varying insulator layer thickness have also been investigated. It was observed that although AlN exhibits the best isothermal behavior, diamond is the best choice when thermal effects are accounted for.

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Date Created
  • 2013

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Compact modeling of multi-gate transistors

Description

Scaling of the classical planar MOSFET below 20 nm gate length is facing not only technological difficulties but also limitations imposed by short channel effects, gate and junction leakage current

Scaling of the classical planar MOSFET below 20 nm gate length is facing not only technological difficulties but also limitations imposed by short channel effects, gate and junction leakage current due to quantum tunneling, high body doping induced threshold voltage variation, and carrier mobility degradation. Non-classical multiple-gate structures such as double-gate (DG) FinFETs and surrounding gate field-effect-transistors (SGFETs) have good electrostatic integrity and are an alternative to planar MOSFETs for below 20 nm technology nodes. Circuit design with these devices need compact models for SPICE simulation. In this work physics based compact models for the common-gate symmetric DG-FinFET, independent-gate asymmetric DG-FinFET, and SGFET are developed. Despite the complex device structure and boundary conditions for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the core structure of the DG-FinFET and SGFET models, are maintained similar to the surface potential based compact models for planar MOSFETs such as SP and PSP. TCAD simulations show differences between the transient behavior and the capacitance-voltage characteristics of bulk and SOI FinFETs if the gate-voltage swing includes the accumulation region. This effect can be captured by a compact model of FinFETs only if it includes the contribution of both types of carriers in the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. An accurate implicit input voltage equation valid in all regions of operation is proposed for common-gate symmetric DG-FinFETs with intrinsic or lightly doped bodies. A closed-form algorithm is developed for solving the new input voltage equation including ambipolar effects. The algorithm is verified for both the surface potential and its derivatives and includes a previously published analytical approximation for surface potential as a special case when ambipolar effects can be neglected. The symmetric linearization method for common-gate symmetric DG-FinFETs is developed in a form free of the charge-sheet approximation present in its original formulation for bulk MOSFETs. The accuracy of the proposed technique is verified by comparison with exact results. An alternative and computationally efficient description of the boundary between the trigonometric and hyperbolic solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the independent-gate asymmetric DG-FinFET is developed in terms of the Lambert W function. Efficient numerical algorithm is proposed for solving the input voltage equation. Analytical expressions for terminal charges of an independent-gate asymmetric DG-FinFET are derived. The new charge model is C-infinity continuous, valid for weak as well as for strong inversion condition of both the channels and does not involve the charge-sheet approximation. This is accomplished by developing the symmetric linearization method in a form that does not require identical boundary conditions at the two Si-SiO2 interfaces and allows for volume inversion in the DG-FinFET. Verification of the model is performed with both numerical computations and 2D TCAD simulations under a wide range of biasing conditions. The model is implemented in a standard circuit simulator through Verilog-A code. Simulation examples for both digital and analog circuits verify good model convergence and demonstrate the capabilities of new circuit topologies that can be implemented using independent-gate asymmetric DG-FinFETs.

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Date Created
  • 2012

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Full-band Schrödinger Poisson solver for DG UTB SOI MOSFET

Description

Moore's law has been the most important driving force for the tremendous progress of semiconductor industry. With time the transistors which form the fundamental building block of any integrated circuit

Moore's law has been the most important driving force for the tremendous progress of semiconductor industry. With time the transistors which form the fundamental building block of any integrated circuit have been shrinking in size leading to smaller and faster electronic devices.As the devices scale down thermal effects and the short channel effects become the important deciding factors in determining transistor architecture.SOI (Silicon on Insulator) devices have been excellent alternative to planar MOSFET for ultimate CMOS scaling since they mitigate short channel effects. Hence as a part of thesis we tried to study the benefits of the SOI technology especially for lower technology nodes when the channel thickness reduces down to sub 10nm regime. This work tries to explore the effects of structural confinement due to reduced channel thickness on the electrostatic behavior of DG SOI MOSFET. DG SOI MOSFET form the Qfinfet which is an alternative to existing Finfet structure. Qfinfet was proposed and patented by the Finscale Inc for sub 10nm technology nodes.

As part of MS Thesis we developed electrostatic simulator for DG SOI devices by implementing the self consistent full band Schrodinger Poisson solver. We used the Empirical Pseudopotential method in conjunction with supercell approach to solve the Schrodinger Equation. EPM was chosen because it has few empirical parameters which give us good accuracy for experimental results. Also EPM is computationally less expensive as compared to the atomistic methods like DFT(Density functional theory) and NEGF (Non-equilibrium Green's function). In our workwe considered two crystallographic orientations of Si,namely [100] and [110].

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Date Created
  • 2016

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Evaluation and characterization of Silicon MESFETs in low dropout regulators

Description

The partially-depleted (PD) silicon Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MESFET) is becoming more and more attractive for analog and RF applications due to its high breakdown voltage. Compared to conventional

The partially-depleted (PD) silicon Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MESFET) is becoming more and more attractive for analog and RF applications due to its high breakdown voltage. Compared to conventional CMOS high voltage transistors, the silicon MESFET can be fabricated in commercial standard Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) CMOS foundries without any change to the process. The transition frequency of the device is demonstrated to be 45GHz, which makes the MESFET suitable for applications in high power RF power amplifier designs. Also, high breakdown voltage and low turn-on resistance make it the ideal choice for switches in the switching regulator designs. One of the anticipated applications of the MESFET is for the pass device for a low dropout linear regulator. Conventional NMOS and PMOS linear regulators suffer from high dropout voltage, low bandwidth and poor stability issues. In contrast, the N-MESFET pass transistor can provide an ultra-low dropout voltage and high bandwidth without the need for an external compensation capacitor to ensure stability. In this thesis, the design theory and problems of the conventional linear regulators are discussed. N-MESFET low dropout regulators are evaluated and characterized. The error amplifier used a folded cascode architecture with gain boosting. The source follower topology is utilized as the buffer to sink the gate leakage current from the MESFET. A shunt-feedback transistor is added to reduce the output impedance and provide the current adaptively. Measurement results show that the dropout voltage is less than 150 mV for a 1A load current at 1.8V output. Radiation measurements were done for discrete MESFET and fully integrated LDO regulators, which demonstrate their radiation tolerance ability for aerospace applications.

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Date Created
  • 2013

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Characterization of high-resistivity silicon bulk and silicon-on-insulator wafers

Description

High-Resistivity Silicon (HRS) substrates are important for low-loss, high-performance microwave and millimeter wave devices in high-frequency telecommunication systems. The highest resistivity of up to ~10,000 ohm.cm is Float Zone (FZ)

High-Resistivity Silicon (HRS) substrates are important for low-loss, high-performance microwave and millimeter wave devices in high-frequency telecommunication systems. The highest resistivity of up to ~10,000 ohm.cm is Float Zone (FZ) grown Si which is produced in small quantities and moderate wafer diameter. The more common Czochralski (CZ) Si can achieve resistivities of around 1000 ohm.cm, but the wafers contain oxygen that can lead to thermal donor formation with donor concentration significantly higher (~1015 cm-3) than the dopant concentration (~1012-1013 cm-3) of such high-resistivity Si leading to resistivity changes and possible type conversion of high-resistivity p-type silicon. In this research capacitance-voltage (C-V) characterization is employed to study the donor formation and type conversion of p-type High-resistivity Silicon-On-Insulator (HRSOI) wafers and the challenges involved in C-V characterization of HRSOI wafers using a Schottky contact are highlighted. The maximum capacitance of bulk or Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) wafers is governed by the gate/contact area. During C-V characterization of high-resistivity SOI wafers with aluminum contacts directly on the Si film (Schottky contact); it was observed that the maximum capacitance is much higher than that due to the contact area, suggesting bias spreading due to the distributed transmission line of the film resistance and the buried oxide capacitance. In addition, an "S"-shape C-V plot was observed in the accumulation region. The effects of various factors, such as: frequency, contact and substrate sizes, gate oxide, SOI film thickness, film and substrate doping, carrier lifetime, contact work-function, temperature, light, annealing temperature and radiation on the C-V characteristics of HRSOI wafers are studied. HRSOI wafers have the best crosstalk prevention capability compared to other types of wafers, which plays a major role in system-on-chip configuration to prevent coupling between high frequency digital and sensitive analog circuits. Substrate crosstalk in HRSOI and various factors affecting the crosstalk, such as: substrate resistivity, separation between devices, buried oxide (BOX) thickness, radiation, temperature, annealing, light, and device types are discussed. Also various ways to minimize substrate crosstalk are studied and a new characterization method is proposed. Owing to their very low doping concentrations and the presence of oxygen in CZ wafers, HRS wafers pose a challenge in resistivity measurement using conventional techniques such as four-point probe and Hall measurement methods. In this research the challenges in accurate resistivity measurement using four-point probe, Hall method, and C-V profile are highlighted and a novel approach to extract resistivity of HRS wafers based on Impedance Spectroscopy measurements using polymer dielectrics such as Polystyrene and Poly Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA) is proposed.

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Date Created
  • 2012

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Modeling of self-heating effects in 25nm SOI devices

Description

Since its inception about three decades ago, silicon on insulator (SOI) technology has come a long way to be included in the microelectronics roadmap. Earlier, scientists and engineers focused on

Since its inception about three decades ago, silicon on insulator (SOI) technology has come a long way to be included in the microelectronics roadmap. Earlier, scientists and engineers focused on ways to increase the microprocessor clock frequency and speed. Today, with smart phones and tablets gaining popularity, power consumption has become a major factor. In this thesis, self-heating effects in a 25nm fully depleted (FD) SOI device are studied by implementing a 2-D particle based device simulator coupled self-consistently with the energy balance equations for both acoustic and optical phonons. Semi-analytical expressions for acoustic and optical phonon scattering rates (all modes) are derived and evaluated using quadratic dispersion relationships. Moreover, probability distribution functions for the final polar angle after scattering is also computed and the rejection technique is implemented for its selection. Since the temperature profile varies throughout the device, temperature dependent scattering tables are used for the electron transport kernel. The phonon energy balance equations are also modified to account for inelasticity in acoustic phonon scattering for all branches. Results obtained from this simulation help in understanding self-heating and the effects it has on the device characteristics. The temperature profiles in the device show a decreasing trend which can be attributed to the inelastic interaction between the electrons and the acoustic phonons. This is further proven by comparing the temperature plots with the simulation results that assume the elastic and equipartition approximation for acoustic and the Einstein model for optical phonons. Thus, acoustic phonon inelasticity and the quadratic phonon dispersion relationships play a crucial role in studying self-heating effects.

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Date Created
  • 2013

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MESFET optimization and innovative design for high current device applications

Description

There will always be a need for high current/voltage transistors. A transistor that has the ability to be both or either of these things is the silicon metal-silicon field effect

There will always be a need for high current/voltage transistors. A transistor that has the ability to be both or either of these things is the silicon metal-silicon field effect transistor (MESFET). An additional perk that silicon MESFET transistors have is the ability to be integrated into the standard silicon on insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process flow. This makes a silicon MESFET transistor a very valuable device for use in any standard CMOS circuit that may usually need a separate integrated circuit (IC) in order to switch power on or from a high current/voltage because it allows this function to be performed with a single chip thereby cutting costs. The ability for the MESFET to cost effectively satisfy the needs of this any many other high current/voltage device application markets is what drives the study of MESFET optimization. Silicon MESFETs that are integrated into standard SOI CMOS processes often receive dopings during fabrication that would not ideally be there in a process made exclusively for MESFETs. Since these remnants of SOI CMOS processing effect the operation of a MESFET device, their effect can be seen in the current-voltage characteristics of a measured MESFET device. Device simulations are done and compared to measured silicon MESFET data in order to deduce the cause and effect of many of these SOI CMOS remnants. MESFET devices can be made in both fully depleted (FD) and partially depleted (PD) SOI CMOS technologies. Device simulations are used to do a comparison of FD and PD MESFETs in order to show the advantages and disadvantages of MESFETs fabricated in different technologies. It is shown that PD MESFET have the highest current per area capability. Since the PD MESFET is shown to have the highest current capability, a layout optimization method to further increase the current per area capability of the PD silicon MESFET is presented, derived, and proven to a first order.

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Date Created
  • 2011

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Optimizing the design of partially and fully depleted MESFETs for low dropout regulators

Description

The constant scaling of supply voltages in state-of-the-art CMOS processes has led to severe limitations for many analog circuit applications. Some CMOS processes have addressed this issue by adding high

The constant scaling of supply voltages in state-of-the-art CMOS processes has led to severe limitations for many analog circuit applications. Some CMOS processes have addressed this issue by adding high voltage MOSFETs to their process. Although it can be a completely viable solution, it usually requires a changing of the process flow or adding additional steps, which in turn, leads to an increase in fabrication costs. Si-MESFETs (silicon-metal-semiconductor-field-effect-transistors) from Arizona State University (ASU) on the other hand, have an inherent high voltage capability and can be added to any silicon-on-insulator (SOI) or silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) CMOS process free of cost. This has been proved at five different commercial foundries on technologies ranging from 0.5 to 0.15 μm. Another critical issue facing CMOS processes on insulated substrates is the scaling of the thin silicon channel. Consequently, the future direction of SOI/SOS CMOS transistors may trend away from partially depleted (PD) transistors and towards fully depleted (FD) devices. FD-CMOS are already being implemented in multiple applications due to their very low power capability. Since the FD-CMOS market only figures to grow, it is appropriate that MESFETs also be developed for these processes. The beginning of this thesis will focus on the device aspects of both PD and FD-MESFETs including their layout structure, DC and RF characteristics, and breakdown voltage. The second half will then shift the focus towards implementing both types of MESFETs in an analog circuit application. Aside from their high breakdown ability, MESFETs also feature depletion mode operation, easy to adjust but well controlled threshold voltages, and fT's up to 45 GHz. Those unique characteristics can allow certain designs that were previously difficult to implement or prohibitively expensive using conventional technologies to now be achieved. One such application which benefits is low dropout regulators (LDO). By utilizing an n-channel MESFET as the pass transistor, a LDO featuring very low dropout voltage, fast transient response, and stable operation can be achieved without an external capacitance. With the focus of this thesis being MESFET based LDOs, the device discussion will be mostly tailored towards optimally designing MESFETs for this particular application.

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Date Created
  • 2010

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Cost-effective integrated wireless monitoring of wafer cleanliness using SOI technology

Description

The thesis focuses on cost-efficient integration of the electro-chemical residue sensor (ECRS), a novel sensor developed for the in situ and real-time measurement of the residual impurities left on the

The thesis focuses on cost-efficient integration of the electro-chemical residue sensor (ECRS), a novel sensor developed for the in situ and real-time measurement of the residual impurities left on the wafer surface and in the fine structures of patterned wafers during typical rinse processes, and wireless transponder circuitry that is based on RFID technology. The proposed technology uses only the NMOS FD-SOI transistors with amorphous silicon as active material with silicon nitride as a gate dielectric. The proposed transistor was simulated under the SILVACO ATLAS Simulation Framework. A parametric study was performed to study the impact of different gate lengths (6 μm to 56 μm), electron motilities (0.1 cm2/Vs to 1 cm2/Vs), gate dielectric (SiO2 and SiNx) and active materials (a-Si and poly-Si) specifications. Level-1 models, that are accurate enough to acquire insight into the circuit behavior and perform preliminary design, were successfully constructed by analyzing drain current and gate to node capacitance characteristics against drain to source and gate to source voltages. Using the model corresponding to SiNx as gate dielectric, a-Si:H as active material with electron mobility equal to 0.4 cm2/V-sec, an operational amplifier was designed and was tested in unity gain configuration at modest load-frequency specifications.

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Date Created
  • 2010