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Privacy preserving service discovery and ranking for multiple user QoS requirements in service-based software systems

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Service based software (SBS) systems are software systems consisting of services based on the service oriented architecture (SOA). Each service in SBS systems provides partial functionalities and collaborates with other

Service based software (SBS) systems are software systems consisting of services based on the service oriented architecture (SOA). Each service in SBS systems provides partial functionalities and collaborates with other services as workflows to provide the functionalities required by the systems. These services may be developed and/or owned by different entities and physically distributed across the Internet. Compared with traditional software system components which are usually specifically designed for the target systems and bound tightly, the interfaces of services and their communication protocols are standardized, which allow SBS systems to support late binding, provide better interoperability, better flexibility in dynamic business logics, and higher fault tolerance. The development process of SBS systems can be divided to three major phases: 1) SBS specification, 2) service discovery and matching, and 3) service composition and workflow execution. This dissertation focuses on the second phase, and presents a privacy preserving service discovery and ranking approach for multiple user QoS requirements. This approach helps service providers to register services and service users to search services through public, but untrusted service directories with the protection of their privacy against the service directories. The service directories can match the registered services with service requests, but do not learn any information about them. Our approach also enforces access control on services during the matching process, which prevents unauthorized users from discovering services. After the service directories match a set of services that satisfy the service users' functionality requirements, the service discovery approach presented in this dissertation further considers service users' QoS requirements in two steps. First, this approach optimizes services' QoS by making tradeoff among various QoS aspects with users' QoS requirements and preferences. Second, this approach ranks services based on how well they satisfy users' QoS requirements to help service users select the most suitable service to develop their SBSs.

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Date Created
  • 2011

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Discovering and using patterns for countering security challenges

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Most existing security decisions for both defending and attacking are made based on some deterministic approaches that only give binary answers. Even though these approaches can achieve low false positive

Most existing security decisions for both defending and attacking are made based on some deterministic approaches that only give binary answers. Even though these approaches can achieve low false positive rate for decision making, they have high false negative rates due to the lack of accommodations to new attack methods and defense techniques. In this dissertation, I study how to discover and use patterns with uncertainty and randomness to counter security challenges. By extracting and modeling patterns in security events, I am able to handle previously unknown security events with quantified confidence, rather than simply making binary decisions. In particular, I cope with the following four real-world security challenges by modeling and analyzing with pattern-based approaches: 1) How to detect and attribute previously unknown shellcode? I propose instruction sequence abstraction that extracts coarse-grained patterns from an instruction sequence and use Markov chain-based model and support vector machines to detect and attribute shellcode; 2) How to safely mitigate routing attacks in mobile ad hoc networks? I identify routing table change patterns caused by attacks, propose an extended Dempster-Shafer theory to measure the risk of such changes, and use a risk-aware response mechanism to mitigate routing attacks; 3) How to model, understand, and guess human-chosen picture passwords? I analyze collected human-chosen picture passwords, propose selection function that models patterns in password selection, and design two algorithms to optimize password guessing paths; and 4) How to identify influential figures and events in underground social networks? I analyze collected underground social network data, identify user interaction patterns, and propose a suite of measures for systematically discovering and mining adversarial evidence. By solving these four problems, I demonstrate that discovering and using patterns could help deal with challenges in computer security, network security, human-computer interaction security, and social network security.

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  • 2014