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A 280 mW, 0.07 % THD+N class-D audio amplifier using a frequency-domain quantizer

Description

Pulse Density Modulation- (PDM-) based class-D amplifiers can reduce non-linearity and tonal content due to carrier signal in Pulse Width Modulation - (PWM-) based amplifiers. However, their low-voltage analog implementations also require a linear- loop filter and a quantizer. A

Pulse Density Modulation- (PDM-) based class-D amplifiers can reduce non-linearity and tonal content due to carrier signal in Pulse Width Modulation - (PWM-) based amplifiers. However, their low-voltage analog implementations also require a linear- loop filter and a quantizer. A PDM-based class-D audio amplifier using a frequency-domain quantization is presented in this paper. The digital-intensive frequency domain approach achieves high linearity under low-supply regimes. An analog comparator and a single-bit quantizer are replaced with a Current-Controlled Oscillator- (ICO-) based frequency discriminator. By using the ICO as a phase integrator, a third-order noise shaping is achieved using only two analog integrators. A single-loop, singlebit class-D audio amplifier is presented with an H-bridge switching power stage, which is designed and fabricated on a 0.18 um CMOS process, with 6 layers of metal achieving a total harmonic distortion plus noise (THD+N) of 0.065% and a peak power efficiency of 80% while driving a 4-ohms loudspeaker load. The amplifier can deliver the output power of 280 mW.

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Date Created
2011

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A 5 GHz ring-oscillator PLL with active delay-discriminator phase noise cancellation loop

Description

Voltage Control Oscillator (VCO) is one of the most critical blocks in Phase Lock Loops (PLLs). LC-tank VCOs have a superior phase noise performance, however they require bulky passive resonators and often calibration architectures to overcome their limited tuning range.

Voltage Control Oscillator (VCO) is one of the most critical blocks in Phase Lock Loops (PLLs). LC-tank VCOs have a superior phase noise performance, however they require bulky passive resonators and often calibration architectures to overcome their limited tuning range. Ring oscillator (RO) based VCOs are attractive for digital technology applications owing to their ease of integration, small die area and scalability in deep submicron processes. However, due to their supply sensitivity and poor phase noise performance, they have limited use in applications demanding low phase noise floor, such as wireless or optical transceivers. Particularly, out-of-band phase noise of RO-based PLLs is dominated by RO performance, which cannot be suppressed by the loop gain, impairing RF receiver's sensitivity or BER of optical clock-data recovery circuits. Wide loop bandwidth PLLs can overcome RO noise penalty, however, they suffer from increased in-band noise due to reference clock, phase-detector and charge-pump. The RO phase noise is determined by the noise coming from active devices, supply, ground and substrate. The authors adopt an auxiliary circuit with inverse delay sensitivity to supply noise, which compensates for the delay variation of inverter cells. Feed-forward noise-cancelling architecture that improves phase noise characteristic of RO based PLLs is presented. The proposed circuit dynamically attenuates RO phase noise contribution outside the PLL bandwidth, or in a preferred band. The implemented noise-cancelling loop potentially enables application of RO based PLL for demanding frequency synthesizers applications, such as optical links or high-speed serial I/Os.

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Date Created
2011

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Phase noise reduction using active biasing

Description

An investigation of phase noise in amplifier and voltage-controller oscillator (VCO) circuits was conducted to show that active direct-current (DC) bias techniques exhibit lower phase noise performance than traditional resistive DC bias techniques. Low-frequency high-gain amplifiers like those found in

An investigation of phase noise in amplifier and voltage-controller oscillator (VCO) circuits was conducted to show that active direct-current (DC) bias techniques exhibit lower phase noise performance than traditional resistive DC bias techniques. Low-frequency high-gain amplifiers like those found in audio applications exhibit much better 1/f phase noise performance and can be used to bias amplifier or VCO circuits that work at much higher frequencies to reduce the phase modulation caused by higher frequency devices. An improvement in single-side-band (SSB) phase noise of 15 dB at offset frequencies less than 50 KHz was simulated and measured. Residual phase noise of an actively biased amplifier also exhibited significant noise improvements when compared to an equivalent resistive biased amplifier.

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Date Created
2010

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Design and calibration of a 12-bit current-steering DAC using data-interleaving

Description

High speed current-steering DACs with high linearity are needed in today's applications such as wired and wireless communications, instrumentation, radar, and other direct digital synthesis (DDS) applications. However, a trade-off exists between the speed and resolution of Nyquist rate

High speed current-steering DACs with high linearity are needed in today's applications such as wired and wireless communications, instrumentation, radar, and other direct digital synthesis (DDS) applications. However, a trade-off exists between the speed and resolution of Nyquist rate current-steering DACs. As the resolution increases, more transistor area is required to meet matching requirements for optimal linearity and thus, the overall speed of the DAC is limited.

In this thesis work, a 12-bit current-steering DAC was designed with current sources scaled below the required matching size to decrease the area and increase the overall speed of the DAC. By scaling the current sources, however, errors due to random mismatch between current sources will arise and additional calibration hardware is necessary to ensure 12-bit linearity. This work presents how to implement a self-calibration DAC that works to fix amplitude errors while maintaining a lower overall area. Additionally, the DAC designed in this thesis investigates the implementation feasibility of a data-interleaved architecture. Data interleaving can increase the total bandwidth of the DACs by 2 with an increase in SQNR by an additional 3 dB.

The final results show that the calibration method can effectively improve the linearity of the DAC. The DAC is able to run up to 400 MSPS frequencies with a 75 dB SFDR performance and above 87 dB SFDR performance at update rates of 200 MSPS.

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Date Created
2014